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Mally

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  1. Like
    Mally got a reaction from eddyramrod in Mrs Sparts MG diary.   
    On reading it though, half a day may see it running.
    After that it's just check the brakes and odds and sods.
    A days work party should be easy to organise.
  2. Like
    Mally got a reaction from eddyramrod in Mrs Sparts MG diary.   
    I have the technology and free time, but not the space, and you are too far away to travel often.
    If no one closer offers I'll willingly look it over when the time is right.
  3. Like
    Mally got a reaction from Six-cylinder in Mrs Sparts MG diary.   
    I have the technology and free time, but not the space, and you are too far away to travel often.
    If no one closer offers I'll willingly look it over when the time is right.
  4. Like
    Mally got a reaction from Tickman in Mrs Sparts MG diary.   
    I have the technology and free time, but not the space, and you are too far away to travel often.
    If no one closer offers I'll willingly look it over when the time is right.
  5. Like
  6. Like
  7. Like
    Mally reacted to Heidel_Kakao in H_K's kar(z), truck(z) & van wot iz knot est8s. Now with amphibious vehicle!!!!! - 18/05/2021   
    Stalwart MK2 Road Registered with HI AB £12,750 plus vat (tanks-alot.co.uk)
    So yesterday was probably the most exciting day of my life! Even more exciting than the day I collected Cedric from Finland believe it or not. I put down a deposit and am now the proud owner of GVO 282J a Mk2 Alvis Stalwart. I have always wanted one of these and now I have one! It has the crane too which according to Nick at Tank's a Lot where I have purchased it from, only 100 Stolly's out of approx 1400 total production had the crane. It also crucially is road registered so I will be able to drive it to work at least once haha. Number fans will notice that like Cedric (VOD 686J) it has a palindrome of 282 and is also like Cedric 50 years old and on a J plate.
    I have two months to pay the balance and collect it, I will need to buy another truck to transport it with so I will have at least three trucks as you do.

    Isn't depreciation a wonderful thing lol.
    https://fb.watch/5yQfwZXirJ/
    It's moving in the video above, I drove it myself afterwards 😅
    Watch this space swimming truck fans









  8. Like
    Mally got a reaction from loserone in Spartacus - Collection on page 2   
    Very sad to hear this.
    I read his posts and topics and marvelled at his, and your enthusiasm for life.
    Condolences  to all the family
     
  9. Like
    Mally reacted to JimH in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    This doesn't look very different to the last picture in the last post except the dark grey primer is now light grey primer. However, in between the picture up there and this one there has been a lot of work. The ash bend was carefully tidied up, the D beadings around the doors/cut outs fitted and finished and the sides flatted down. By flatted down I don't mean wafted over with a bit of P120. It took a long time to sand the boards so the whole side was as flat as my talents could manage. That meant removing all of the dark grey primer which jolly well should not have been there in the first place ho hum.
     
     
    Levers in shiny paint...

    Period looking valve handles applied to non-period valves...

    And a top damper made for the chimney. Chimney top casting still looks shocking because No1 apprentice has only just started on it. The chimney cap is supposed to be a pressed steel thing painted black but we haven't managed to get one of those yet so we are having to make do with this rather poor casting. I have a passionate loathing of polished brass chimney caps so this will be painted black anyway.

    And a lever for the top damper made to look something like it should. This flap just swings over the chimney to keep the boiler a bit warmer overnight.

    I need 128 angled brackets to build the body. This is the sort of soul destroying job that is given to an apprentice. Fortunately we have some of them to do that sort of work now. 28 down, 100 to go.

    It is good practice for No1 apprentice to learn to gas weld. Annoyingly she has much steadier hands than me so despite just starting she is already pretty good.I know this weld is probably the easiest one there is but the steel is quite light and bracket quite fiddly. Anyway, the most important hurdle to get over is being shit scared of the burny hot flame.

    The water tank has been blasted, caulked, treated and bolted up for a pressure test which it passed to my amazement. I need to spend some time on it sorting out the fold marks and tidying up the ends.

    This is the colour of the interior. I need this bit painted so I can avoid removing the levers again to paint the rest of the interior.

    A back end looking a bit black. About the only thing left to do to stop it moving under its own power is the brake levers and the temporary water tank to rig up.

    I lashed out some money on a new one of these. Nice, isn't it?

    We jump on a wee bit and here are the brake levers buttoned up in place. Once it was all hammered up we put the bucket pump on the brake cylinder and pumped it up to 1.5 times what it could reasonably be expected to see. Nothing leaked, squeeked, creaked or broke so that's good. We now have fully functioning brakes. There are some springs to get to take any rattles out of the levers but they aren't here yet.

    Being at a loose end this weekend I started final fitting the doors. They weren't too far off last time but there was still a bit to go with them.

    And I finished off the wee bit at the top of the passenger door cut out.

    The off side door was an easier fit (no the bolts haven't been cut down yet) but you do get a good idea of how roomy the cab is and how easy it is to access. You really don' want t bail out of this in an emergency situation. Steering wheel isn't on because I'm currently coxcombing it. Ooh. Err. Missus.

    From the front you see that you have to lace your legs around a few hard and/or hot things. The four posts sticking up support the footplate which isn't in at the moment. The footplate is a slightly non standard thing that lifts your feet up so they can reach the brake valve.

    Throttle valve in place but not piped up because the insurance inspector is arriving soon to do the cold exam. Then it gets reassembled to do the hot test and then it all gets stripped down again so the cladding can be fitted. However, before it gets stripped down again we'll be able to test a few things to make sure everything works as intended.  We also need to make a heat shield for the throttle valve because it is right next to your knee and it gets very hot indeed.

    This is good. This is the start of the door latch. It is a bit of 1" D beading with a 90 degree bend in it. Once it is finished it won't look much less crude than this. The idea is that it bolts to the inside of the cab side and swings over to hold the door closed. They did phone this one in. 

    This is the chimney you saw further up the page somewhere near done. Now it can be painted with VHT paint as an assembly. The cap has had a lot of work sunk into it by No1 apprentice with files and a die grinder and it is now looking pretty close to the shape it should be. The damper boss was a bit of a mess to it had to be built up with Belzona to make it look a wee bit less rubbish.

    Things like the chimneys never get much thought but this one has soaked up a lot of manhours.

    One thing which was done that has taken forever but I have no photos to show is that the superheater is now fitted to the chimney base. It was then all dismantled for inspection so things don't look much different other than a few more holes in the chimney base. What it does mean is that as soon as th cold exam is done we can get some heat on the boiler.
    I've also just go an email from the wood yards to say that the wood for the rear body is ready which means that once we've collected it we'll be able to start constructing that. Oh joy.
     
     
  10. Like
    Mally reacted to JimH in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    Let's start this update with a throttle valve handle. Most throttle valve handles for Sentinels are cast. As far as I am aware originally they were cast hollow to keep the heat in your hand down a bit but many around now  have been copied from hollow ones without a core meaning that they are solid. By chance we found an early drawing of a throttle valve handle which showed them being made from several pieces with a rotating knob made from hardwood. This seemed like a much cooler (literally) idea than the cost one and also meant that we didn't need to pay for a pattern and core box to be made so we got a nice man to make us a handle in oak. I think he charged us a tenner for it. This is the throttle valve ready to go being only short of its heat shield which will get made once it is in position.

    Levers final fitted and in the process of having some paint blown on them. They are in primer at the moment. These lorries were not built for a long life and the paint coatings that were applied were specified on that basis.

    And this is the steam brake mechanism that you have seen growing up slowly all finished and having paint blown on it. The bits of steel on the top are the front mudguard brackets which took a while to get right. This will get one coat of top before it is bolted back in. Then it will get a second.

    Now the front mudguards have been fitted then they need painted before they go on. These were never designed to have wings like this (the solids just had a splashguard rolled from flat plate) so they are a right pain to fit so they look right. It is a bit of a juggling act.

    The feedheater buttoned up, tested and has its cladding fitted. It just needs bolted in place once the first boiler inspection has been carried out.

    And here is the back of the chassis getting its blowover. Only in primer at the moment.

    This will mean very little but I am very pleased with this. This is looking up at the ash bend which now has its beading on. I learned a few lessons from the last one so the beading sits much more comfortably than last time. On that one the beading sat too low, only a uqrter of an inch or so but it never looked right. This one is much righter.

    The white line you see is the canvas covering which I spent a while gluing down. We had this stitched up by the local tarpaulin people so the seams looked the part. It is interesting to note that while paints have gone all pansy with less and less solvent Evo Stik is still cjock to the gunwhales with evil smelling poison. It did the job anyway. I think this will get a coating of something suitable to help it be waterproof(ish).

    Edge detail for the canvas and how the beading finishes it off. There is a fair bit more finishing to do around here.

    Yet more roof detail. You will probably see that the flameguard around the chimney hasn't been fitted yet. The body will have the same material covering it but that is about three times as big as the cab so that's going to get pretty smelly.

    The new casting for this turned up yesterday (the last one didn't pass its test) so this got machined this morning. This is the last bit that was needed to get some pressure on the boiler.

    And this arrived too. It is the arm that operates the bypass (or byepass if you are Sentinel) valve for the water pump. The water pump runs all the time so if you don't want to put water in the boiler then you have to spill it back to the tank. This arm is operated from a handle in the cab connected by a bit of wire rope.

    And these came too. A pile of valve handles that look a bit more age appropriate. They certainly look better than aluminium ones painted red.

    D beadings for the cab getting the backs of them painted so they can be fitted for the last time.

    Headlamp ad sidelight bowls in top coat waiting to be fitted up for the last time. The headlamps will have some Wipac H4s hidden in them because we drive on the road at night a lot so decent headlamps ar pretty important. You really need to have a good idea about what the road is going to do next (up and down rather thn side to side). The side lights are repurposed as indicators so the sidelights proper will be in the headlamps. Agin, not completely accurate but you really need indicators on the road and this way they get hidden pretty well. Modern LEDs avoid the gingercator problem.

    And some primer on bits of the cab.

    In other news the wood has been ordered to build the rear body so that was pretty painful and it should be here in a couple of weeks. The other problem is now the colour. For a while we've been convinced that it was going to be green. We were certain that the UCBS colours would have been some sort of period correct shade of green. We'd been considering the various options and had selttled on Dark Brunswick Green as the most likely option. We were on the verge of ordering the paint when we took the water tank to get blasted. In the course of a chat with the lad who was doing it we mentioned that we were going to turn it out in UCBS colours. The next words that came out of his mouth were "Aye, they had a bakery in Dunfermline. Their wagons were all dark red with cream writing". Bugger, that's thrown a spanner in the works. 
    Knowing Glasgow it is possible that certain comapnies might have avoided green or blue so maybe the red (or reddy brown which would tie up with them using something like Crimson Lake) so maybe the lad was right. A brainwave was to ask one of the older bakers in Glasgow if he remembered what they were. This morning we got a letter back from Boyd Tunnock saying that as far as he could remember the wagons were all brown with cream lettering. Oh.
    Brown might have been crimson lake which is a bit muddy or it might have been brown. We'll just have to keep looking before we buy any paint.
    It might end up being turned out as a Boots lorry at this rate.
     
     
     
     
  11. Like
    Mally reacted to JimH in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    Things keep getting slower because you have to spend ages finishing things. When you first made a clevis pin it was just something to link one thing to another so you turn the pin up, pop it in the hole and use it to make sure everything works. In your mind it is finished. However, now you have to take that pin, machine the head, drill it out and tap it to take the grease nipple, make a collar for it and drill it to take the split pin. Nothing hard but enough to make a couple of hours disappear. As we go on you need to look harder at the pictures to see a difference.
    For example here is one end of the handbrake operating rod. In this picture the pin has been finished.

    In this photo it looks braodly similar. Only the sharp eyed would notice that the thrust collar has appeared on the cross shaft together with a little bit of shim. Again, not much difference but three or four hours gone in making the thrust collars and fitting the cross shaft bearing blocks so everything moves freely even when things start moving and twisting. Just need to make a nice shim now.

    And here is the finished throttle valve which was "finished" ages ago. However, then you start buttoning it up and testing things you find that the valve buttin for the main stop valve isn't right because we misunderstood the design so you need to make a new one. The best part of a week of work went into finishing this off. This is it waiting to get bolted on. The only thing missing now is the lagging jacket and heat protector for your poor knee which sits next to it.

    We've had a picture very similar to before but again, this is it finished and bolted back on. You would need to be sharp eyed to see that some poor sod stood at the bench for hours tidying everything up.

    And at the other end everything looks nice and tidy now. This is the way that the fire is controlled. If you want to calm it down you lift the ash pan up and reduce at amount of air that comes in.

    These are the reversing levers finished off but not painted. They were not too far off before but the reversing lever needed the detent spring made so it stayed in the right place. We also got lucky and some kind soul donated a brass plate showing the cut off positions.

    Then you take a photo of it and notce that you forgot to machine the bolt markings off the clamp bolt. Something else to do. However, everything moves as it is meant to. Once we are happy with it it will be lifted off and painted as an assembly which was pretty much how it was done back then. These things never lasted that long so not much was wasted on coatings.

    Yet another rod end finished off. Yes I know the bolts are all too long and the nuts are wrong. It is all on the to do list. The wing is only sitting on top of the wheel out of the way.

    And this cover (the thing that has clearly been gas welded) stops rocks and larger wildlife falling into the camshaft control box. Not quite finished yet but it still took a few hours to get this far.

    As if we didn't have enough to do we used to have two of these but some light fingered shite had away with one of them. This is the handle that works the exhaust drain valve and this is the one off the S4.

    And this is the one that was made for the Super. Normally these are cast but we just could not be arsed tracking down the pattern that is available for them. It still needs the castelated nut and spring to make it look right. Still, it's pretty close to the original.

    We got the superheater tails welded up (it's under a fair bit of load so you leave the TIGing to someone with some certificates) and now there is the nightmare task of fitting the supports and mounting it on the boiler top. This is one of the worst jobs of the whole project.

    And we still plug through all the bits for the brakes finishing things off.

    Boiler clacks finished and pressure tested. Incidentally, the testing is more than just a formality. When we pumped up the boiler outlet which was a new steel casting it showed up a minor fault in it so it had to be junked. There is a new one on its way from the foundry.

    Finally for now here is the knackered cheek plate covered in wob and more wob.

    Why? So I cover it with layers of this.

    Why? Becuase I want to try to make one of these to see if it makes it easier to finish the cheek plates.We'll give it a go, anyway.
     
     
     
     
     
  12. Like
    Mally reacted to JimH in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    Not much progress to see but I was in there with the camera in my hand so we'll have a short update.
    A lot of this sort of thing has been going on.

    We quite like bending stuff hot freehand rather than using formers. The pipe is packed with sand to stop it collapsing while pulling it. Trying to fit the pipes in can get a bit tricky at times so shapes can become rather flambouyant rather than a series of 90 degree turns. This is the throttle valve to engine steam pipe which is run in steel. Everything else is run in heavy wall copper pipe.
    This is the feed heater piped up. Yes I know the feed line is on the piss - there is nothing below the footplate holding it in place. The loop to the boiler clack is rather tall to clear the clack valve handle. You never really see it from this angle so it doesn't look quite as bonkers as it does here.

    Starting the work of piping up the water pump. The pipe running past the cylinders is the delivery to the boiler and you can just see the feed coming from the tank looping through a handy gap in the rear axle. Every pipe union you see has to be made. This takes quite a while.

    Often theinjectors were either mounted directly onto the boiler which meant they sat screaming hot or tucked up in a gap just above the offside front wing which meant the olfy the driver could reach it. We've taken the approach of plumbing it in like an S type with it sitting under the footplate. We modified it further to use a remote water valve which makes it nicer to use. You can just see the valve bolted under the footplate. It's a bit too modern but you can really see it once it is painted black and they are very nice to use.

    This is the water valve positioned out of the way but in a place where both driver and stoker can reach it. There are occassions where the engine is running slowly but steam consumption is too high for the water pump so the injector is nice to have. It was just a pain on the other one expecting the driver to drive and work the injector a the same time. We've made the ram on the water pump as large as possible on this one so hopefully those rare we need to use the injector on the road moments will be even rarer.

    And here are the pipes at the water tank. One feed goes to the water pump and the second to the injector. Sometimes there was a filter box on either side of the water tank so the pump and injector had it's own filter box. The reason for this one one dip tube ran deeper than the other so you got warning that you were running out of water when your pump stopped working. You could then use the injector unitl you got more water. This tank is the reserve tank - there will be another 350 gallons or so above it - so we didn't feel the final reserve capacity was worth the effort of machining another filter box. Note also the fake water lifter with fake pipe wrapped in not fake asbestos string.

    Some of the new valve handles to replace the horrible modern ones on the gauge frame (see above)

    Second brake arm made and first fitted. There are some bits missing at the moment because they haven't been ordered yet. Nothing major - just a spring or two. The brake rod is too long at the moment.

    And at the other end of the brake rod...

    Now the brake arms, rods and balance bar is in place it was then possible to finish the handbrake. Sadlyat that point I realised that I'd barely started the bloody thing so most days off over Crimble were spend turning lumps of bar into rod ends and slotted links. Here are some of them in various states of finishedness. The slotted link allows the brakes to work independently of the handbrake.

    This is the start of the piston rod end which lets the handbrake link articulate. This is the third piston rod end I have made because the design of this thing keeps changing. I suspect that this is the reason for employing designers and draughies rather than expecting machinists to make stuff up as they go along.

    And a pair of bearing blocks for the handbrake cross shaft.

    And that is about it. The big shed is very cold so the urge to work gets a bit dented at these temperatures. You tend to stay in the small shop doing jobs that involves standing as close to the stove as possible.
  13. Like
    Mally reacted to SiC in 1974 Dolomite Sprint   
    Busy weekend hacking away slowly at this sill.

    First job was to weld in the piece that was clamped up a few months ago. Also welded a bit more up on the inner membrane. I have a new panel that I could replace all this, however I'm keen to keep most of what I can as some of it is in good shape and original too.

    Before

    After


    Next was to tackle the rear of the sill. This had been repaired before but looked like externally without having as much access as I do now.


    A lot of chopping of old repair work out left quite a bit missing.


    Now a case of piecing it all back together again.








    That took a good 6 hours of work over the weekend. Slow progress but chipping away at it a piece at a time.

    The inner wheel arch is going to need serious reconstruction. The inside panel is completely missing at the bottom corner. It is quite a complex curved shape that needs to be replicated.


    Then there is holes along the top and then quite a bit missing at the bottom rear. Outer arch I have a repair piece. But there isn't too much for it to join back onto yet.


    Probably going to obtain a panel to repair this. Not cheap and I will only need a smallish section to do this. But would save a whole lot of time while being a neater job.
  14. Thanks
    Mally got a reaction from Spottedlaurel in The new news 24 thread   
    As you know I have one of these destined eventually for the ovals. Could be next year, could be August, depends how the wind blows.
    If you need any interior bits, lights etc along the way let me know. I can't take them off for a while. but when it happens they will be very very cheap.
    There's 2 brand new tyres and 2 good ones on it that we will never use.
    Where abouts are you?  Big place Norfolk.
  15. Haha
    Mally got a reaction from stonedagain in The new news 24 thread   
    You need to get a spare key made at once, before you lose it.
  16. Like
    Mally got a reaction from Isopon in Mally's Stock Cars, Bikes,Life and Minor events.   
    As alluded on the for sale/wanted thread, I've bought a Yaris, This is due to hit the grass tracks in 2022. In 2023 my granddaughter will take it over. I've been looking at overpriced crap for 3 weeks until.

    Someone stole the cat rendering it unusable, to her at least.
    However,

    It's fine* now.
    We have legally whizzed it around, and I could easily sell it now for double.
    Granddaughter says, 'can we not buy a rusty one for me to race and save this one for when I pass my test'...(in 9 years time).
    So let it stand for a while incase we need a road car, but it's long term future is inevitable.
    There are things I can be doing, Fuel tank, battery box.  And other things I don't know how to do, such as-
    Wiring loom.  Have been quoted £400 for a plug and play conversion to our loom.  I only paid £300 for the car!
    There are clever people, @cobblersmay be one, who understand this sort of wizadry.
    Any suggestions or opinions are welcome, ECU's are alien to me. 
    I wire a battery, to a switch, to a coil. Always worked in the old days.
     
  17. Like
    Mally reacted to Bfg in Triumph - That was a year that was..   
    May 5th :
    I moved the weekend before last from one side of the car park to the other (..in the apartment block complex), primarily because the studio apartment was too small for all my unsorted 'stuff' and equally because I wanted needed a designated place to work on the car..  The new residence is a one-bed apartment but with patio large enough to land the car on. . .

    ^ Although south facing, the first job I did was to jet-wash the patio of most of its dingy green algae.  And then with the new low entry / high lift trolley jack ..and borrowed ramps - the car is now safely elevated enough for me to slide under and investigate various issues ..essentially regarding Katie's  very poor passenger-door-gap and how much chassis / car flex might I expect when jacking the car up.? 
    These questions were prompted by my acquiring the Surrey top and back-light a couple of weeks ago, and then also a Surrey lid (in steel) ..thanks to the kind generosity of RogerH of the TR forum.. whom I had the great pleasure to meet when I collected it on Thursday. .

    My thinking was ; It might be OK with a fabric Surrey top and adjustable bows, but with the windscreen posts moveable and the rear wings not necessarily being symmetrical on this car, then how would a steel lid fit.?  Naturally things have to be fixed to within a few mm.. but the passenger door gap tapers from 14mm opening at the top to 3mm in its bottom rear corner.   Bottom line is that I needed to investigate what, if anything was happening with the door gap. before I struggle to fit the backlight and lid.
    I slipped under the jacked up car to have a look at the chassis when I bought her  ..just two months ago now, and then again when the car was jacked up briefly while removing / refitting the gearbox / clutch.  In general it appeared to have been locally patched but in good shape.  Before I jacked the car up this time I measured the top of the door gaps, then lifted the car under the rear swing arm and measured the door gap again.  I was pleasantly surprised that there was just 1.5mm difference on one side and 2mm on the other.  A kind gent dropped me a PM to share that his car was much the same.  
    Pleased that the main backbone wasn't moving too much, and now with the car on stands I investigated further. The rear chassis leg on the LHS is cracked as is the rear bridge between the two rear chassis legs, onto which the dampers are bolted.  This also supports the rear diff mounts. . . 
         
    ^ LHS rear chassis leg (which goes to the rear bumper bracket).  This would not be difficult to clean up re-weld and to add a doubler plate.  It has been welded before but I don't know if that was from new or a repair.  The question I must ask is ; whether there is some issue to have caused it to crack (some time ago by the looks of things) or is it just the result of fatigue over many years ?

    ^ photo of across the car with the arrow left indicating where the crack is on the LHS.  Immediately above this is the bridge from one side of the chassis to the other, onto which the lever-arm dampers are bolted and the rear diff mounts.  That is also cracked on both sides. . .

    ^ LHS -  looking into the corner of the rear chassis leg with the bridge

    ^ LHS looking back to the bridge with the lever-arm damper in light grey. The crack appears to go right the way across.
    On the RHS its probably worse . . .

    RHS bottom of the rear leg has a little rusty orange stain, so looks to be just starting to crack in the same place as has happened on the LHS rear leg.  The crack between that chassis member and the bridge is obvious.

    RHS looking forward to that bridge.   Again I wonder - why has it cracked through ?
    So., all in all a bit of welding needed.  Whether it is necessary / much better to replace that bridge for a box section tubular one I don't know.  I don't want to lift the body off but I can't see getting above it to weld a replacement bridge in is going to be possible even if the exhaust + lever arm dampers + diff + possibly fuel tank (for safety reasons) are removed.  
    I've asked on the TR forum if someone has experience of doing this with body on.
    Out of interest I eased the LHS rear chassis leg up with the jack, just by the exhaust silencer cross-box, and although the chassis leg's crack hardly opened up (perhaps just 1/2mm) the top of that side's door gap closed by 4mm.   x2 that would be nice.!   However I'm naturally concerned about twisting the chassis rear legs and rear-end of the body so the car would look even lower still on the driver's side.
    Why the car has a list to the RHS is not yet apparent.  I'm sure that I've read somewhere that the swinging arm brackets are adjustable and may even be fitted upside.  Possibly this is the same at for the front suspension.  Perhaps someone might point me to the thread which reveals all.?
    In the meantime these are the photos I took today of those mountings. Perhaps someone can see something amiss which would cause the car to sit lower on the RHS  . . .

    ^ Looking forward, so Left and Right hand side

    ^ Left and Right hand side of the swing arm mounts. 
    Many thanks in anticipation,
    Pete
     
  18. Like
    Mally reacted to Amishtat in The new news 24 thread   
    Nice twenty mile amble through the Nith valley this morning to go to the Post office, then home for a Sctsh lunch. 


  19. Like
    Mally got a reaction from LightBulbFun in Mally's Stock Cars, Bikes,Life and Minor events.   
    Nothing happening in our Stock Car world for a good while. First meeting this year for us is Mildenhall 22nd May.
     
    Meanwhile have a throwback item.

    Scimitar, dragged out of a London garage after a long rest. Transported by my long time friend Dave Speed to his workshop to be refurbished for my eldest son.
    Finished item collected today after much work and a few* complications, and driven Rochdale to Chester without mishap.
    Few photos below.
    Apologies for f/b I don't like it myself, but it's all the photos I have at present. If anyone has the technology to make them open to all, please do.
    https://www.facebook.com/ssgclassics/
  20. Like
    Mally got a reaction from Spottedlaurel in Mally's Stock Cars, Bikes,Life and Minor events.   
    As alluded on the for sale/wanted thread, I've bought a Yaris, This is due to hit the grass tracks in 2022. In 2023 my granddaughter will take it over. I've been looking at overpriced crap for 3 weeks until.

    Someone stole the cat rendering it unusable, to her at least.
    However,

    It's fine* now.
    We have legally whizzed it around, and I could easily sell it now for double.
    Granddaughter says, 'can we not buy a rusty one for me to race and save this one for when I pass my test'...(in 9 years time).
    So let it stand for a while incase we need a road car, but it's long term future is inevitable.
    There are things I can be doing, Fuel tank, battery box.  And other things I don't know how to do, such as-
    Wiring loom.  Have been quoted £400 for a plug and play conversion to our loom.  I only paid £300 for the car!
    There are clever people, @cobblersmay be one, who understand this sort of wizadry.
    Any suggestions or opinions are welcome, ECU's are alien to me. 
    I wire a battery, to a switch, to a coil. Always worked in the old days.
     
  21. Like
    Mally got a reaction from Tickman in Mally's Stock Cars, Bikes,Life and Minor events.   
    Nothing happening in our Stock Car world for a good while. First meeting this year for us is Mildenhall 22nd May.
     
    Meanwhile have a throwback item.

    Scimitar, dragged out of a London garage after a long rest. Transported by my long time friend Dave Speed to his workshop to be refurbished for my eldest son.
    Finished item collected today after much work and a few* complications, and driven Rochdale to Chester without mishap.
    Few photos below.
    Apologies for f/b I don't like it myself, but it's all the photos I have at present. If anyone has the technology to make them open to all, please do.
    https://www.facebook.com/ssgclassics/
  22. Like
    Mally got a reaction from crad in Mally's Stock Cars, Bikes,Life and Minor events.   
    As alluded on the for sale/wanted thread, I've bought a Yaris, This is due to hit the grass tracks in 2022. In 2023 my granddaughter will take it over. I've been looking at overpriced crap for 3 weeks until.

    Someone stole the cat rendering it unusable, to her at least.
    However,

    It's fine* now.
    We have legally whizzed it around, and I could easily sell it now for double.
    Granddaughter says, 'can we not buy a rusty one for me to race and save this one for when I pass my test'...(in 9 years time).
    So let it stand for a while incase we need a road car, but it's long term future is inevitable.
    There are things I can be doing, Fuel tank, battery box.  And other things I don't know how to do, such as-
    Wiring loom.  Have been quoted £400 for a plug and play conversion to our loom.  I only paid £300 for the car!
    There are clever people, @cobblersmay be one, who understand this sort of wizadry.
    Any suggestions or opinions are welcome, ECU's are alien to me. 
    I wire a battery, to a switch, to a coil. Always worked in the old days.
     
  23. Like
    Mally got a reaction from Shite Ron in Mally's Stock Cars, Bikes,Life and Minor events.   
    Nothing happening in our Stock Car world for a good while. First meeting this year for us is Mildenhall 22nd May.
     
    Meanwhile have a throwback item.

    Scimitar, dragged out of a London garage after a long rest. Transported by my long time friend Dave Speed to his workshop to be refurbished for my eldest son.
    Finished item collected today after much work and a few* complications, and driven Rochdale to Chester without mishap.
    Few photos below.
    Apologies for f/b I don't like it myself, but it's all the photos I have at present. If anyone has the technology to make them open to all, please do.
    https://www.facebook.com/ssgclassics/
  24. Like
    Mally got a reaction from Zie in Mally's Stock Cars, Bikes,Life and Minor events.   
    As alluded on the for sale/wanted thread, I've bought a Yaris, This is due to hit the grass tracks in 2022. In 2023 my granddaughter will take it over. I've been looking at overpriced crap for 3 weeks until.

    Someone stole the cat rendering it unusable, to her at least.
    However,

    It's fine* now.
    We have legally whizzed it around, and I could easily sell it now for double.
    Granddaughter says, 'can we not buy a rusty one for me to race and save this one for when I pass my test'...(in 9 years time).
    So let it stand for a while incase we need a road car, but it's long term future is inevitable.
    There are things I can be doing, Fuel tank, battery box.  And other things I don't know how to do, such as-
    Wiring loom.  Have been quoted £400 for a plug and play conversion to our loom.  I only paid £300 for the car!
    There are clever people, @cobblersmay be one, who understand this sort of wizadry.
    Any suggestions or opinions are welcome, ECU's are alien to me. 
    I wire a battery, to a switch, to a coil. Always worked in the old days.
     
  25. Like
    Mally got a reaction from Mrs6C in Mally's Stock Cars, Bikes,Life and Minor events.   
    As alluded on the for sale/wanted thread, I've bought a Yaris, This is due to hit the grass tracks in 2022. In 2023 my granddaughter will take it over. I've been looking at overpriced crap for 3 weeks until.

    Someone stole the cat rendering it unusable, to her at least.
    However,

    It's fine* now.
    We have legally whizzed it around, and I could easily sell it now for double.
    Granddaughter says, 'can we not buy a rusty one for me to race and save this one for when I pass my test'...(in 9 years time).
    So let it stand for a while incase we need a road car, but it's long term future is inevitable.
    There are things I can be doing, Fuel tank, battery box.  And other things I don't know how to do, such as-
    Wiring loom.  Have been quoted £400 for a plug and play conversion to our loom.  I only paid £300 for the car!
    There are clever people, @cobblersmay be one, who understand this sort of wizadry.
    Any suggestions or opinions are welcome, ECU's are alien to me. 
    I wire a battery, to a switch, to a coil. Always worked in the old days.
     
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