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Conrad D. Conelrad

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  1. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad reacted to dome in Domes shonky autos-S4 fettling dragging on..   
    Results are in!

    Yaaas!
    Now to get some miles on it and sort it out
  2. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad got a reaction from egg in Skizzer’s shedlife: a win at the casino Royale   
    Aw, man, that thing. What an infuriating car! Every component of the fuel system appeared to work on its own, but together? Not a splutter. We even pestered a Bosch Classic employee at Essen who couldn't point us in the right direction either. Eventually we decided we'd spent enough time being marinaded in petrol and flogged it on eBay, half expecting to see it at the next Stan Woods. A few months later, however, it popped up on the DVLA site as taxed and MOT'd! So I was straight on eBay to ask the buyer to ask how they fixed it, praying he wouldn't say something like "oh yeah, there was no rotor arm in it" . But his response vindicated us - I can't find the message now, but the gist of it was renewal of almost the entire fuel injection system. In short, yes, he should have stuck a carb on it. 
  3. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad got a reaction from brownnova in Skizzer’s shedlife: a win at the casino Royale   
    Aw, man, that thing. What an infuriating car! Every component of the fuel system appeared to work on its own, but together? Not a splutter. We even pestered a Bosch Classic employee at Essen who couldn't point us in the right direction either. Eventually we decided we'd spent enough time being marinaded in petrol and flogged it on eBay, half expecting to see it at the next Stan Woods. A few months later, however, it popped up on the DVLA site as taxed and MOT'd! So I was straight on eBay to ask the buyer to ask how they fixed it, praying he wouldn't say something like "oh yeah, there was no rotor arm in it" . But his response vindicated us - I can't find the message now, but the gist of it was renewal of almost the entire fuel injection system. In short, yes, he should have stuck a carb on it. 
  4. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad got a reaction from garethj in Skizzer’s shedlife: a win at the casino Royale   
    Aw, man, that thing. What an infuriating car! Every component of the fuel system appeared to work on its own, but together? Not a splutter. We even pestered a Bosch Classic employee at Essen who couldn't point us in the right direction either. Eventually we decided we'd spent enough time being marinaded in petrol and flogged it on eBay, half expecting to see it at the next Stan Woods. A few months later, however, it popped up on the DVLA site as taxed and MOT'd! So I was straight on eBay to ask the buyer to ask how they fixed it, praying he wouldn't say something like "oh yeah, there was no rotor arm in it" . But his response vindicated us - I can't find the message now, but the gist of it was renewal of almost the entire fuel injection system. In short, yes, he should have stuck a carb on it. 
  5. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad reacted to Cleon-Fonte in Exceeding BXpectations - Now With Added Renault 4   
    Life with a Renault 4 is a largely uneventful experience, they tend to just work most of the time and after all the carb fuckwittery I've been rewarded with pretty reliable service. There were a few teething troubles, that dodgy new condensor from a previous post killed my coil, and its replacement, before I binned it for an NOS Renault one. Then when I went to fetch the BX's new head the carb repaid me for my minimal cleaning after purchase by causing serious fuel starvation, driving from Peterborough to Glossop entirely on backroads in a car that'll only go at wide open throttle with the choke on was a bit of an arse. Otherwise it's been fine.
     

     
    What a car! The Renault 4 GTL is truly the car for everything, it's as much in its element powering effortlessly over tiny lanes and farm tracks at speeds that would break most cars as it is serving as an urban runabout. Not that it's restricted to such work, it'll comfortably cruise along at 70mph all day and the soft, spongy seats and suspension make it a thoroughly pleasant way of doing long journeys. Some people might consider the R4 slow but in actual fact its performance is merely much more in tune with modern traffic conditions than most cars, I rarely travel slower than I would in anything else. It also handles extremely well, once you've learned to ignore the body roll you can drive along twisty roads at indecent speeds, slowing as little as possible for corners and using the throttle as a second steering mechanism.
    There also can't be many cars of this size that can function as a very effective small van when required, capable of hauling surprisingly large, bulky items with ease, and can then accommodate four people (plus their luggage) in a remarkably high level of comfort for a cheap economy machine. It's impossible to appreciate just how practical these little cars are until you live with one.
    September saw a trip to Cholmodeley where it added some class to the 1980s section along with its main rival and a slightly more sophisticated compatriot.
     

     
    It was then used to collect another small Renault.
     

     
    With the thing up and running I could finally start improving its condition, but that's for another post.
     
  6. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad got a reaction from brownnova in NORTHERN POWERHOUSE Classic - 7ish PM Tuesday 3rd December @ Glossop   
    That's right, it's the first Tuesday of the month. 
  7. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad got a reaction from brownnova in NORTHERN POWERHOUSE Classic - 7ish PM Tuesday 3rd December @ Glossop   
    Salutations. 
    This month's meeting of the North's finest will take place on Tuesday 3rd March.
    Usual place and time, everyone welcome.  
  8. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad reacted to Cleon-Fonte in Exceeding BXpectations - Now With Added Renault 4   
    Whilst browsing French Renault 4 parts sites over breakfast one morning I discovered the answer to all my problems (well, all my Renault fuel delivery problems at least).
    Enter Solex No.3.
     

     
    It's a Solex 28IBS. These were originally fitted to Renault Dauphines but were later fitted to some Spanish R4s and R6s (which were always a bit weird compared with their counterparts built elsewhere). Unlike the big Solexes, it's a direct swap for the original Zenith and will just bolt on to the existing R4 hardware. The best bit about it, though, is how simple (and fixable) it is, it can be completely stripped down to its component parts and reassembled in a matter of minutes and all parts are readily available online.
    Once I'd discovered it's probably easier to send money to al Qaeda than some bloke with some Renault 4 parts in rural France who doesn't use PayPal, and in the process bailed out my bank with transfer fees, I could sit back, wait for the French postal service to do their thing and look forward to many happy miles of motoring.
    Well, I could have if I'd not decided while waiting for the new carb to test fit the big 32mm carb and manifold to see just how many things I'd need to change over for it to work. It turns out there's a weak point on these R4 cylinder heads around one of the manifold studs and if you tighten that particular manifold nut to anything near the manufacturer's torque setting it's entirely likely you'll crack the head. Naturally I was unaware of this sage advice until the new carb had arrived, I'd gone to refit the old manifold, torqued the nut up to the recommended torque setting and cracked the head.
    The crack wasn't so bad that the head couldn't be reused, but there was limited time available and my welder friend didn't really have long enough to do a thorough job. Junkman and I had a leisurely afternoon refitting the head but after a few minutes of running the crack reappeared. With even less time to get it sorted I bought a good used head for a relative pittance and went about fitting that instead.
    The first job was to swap over all the bits from the old head.
     

     
    Then it could be taken to its new home.
     

     
    The Renault got its second new head gasket in a week.
     

     
    The head was then manoeuvred into place (easier said than done when there's a lump of cast iron hanging off one side) and bolted down. None of your stretch bolt nonsense here.
     

     
    The rocker shaft was then attached.
     

     
    And that was the bulk of the work done. All in reattaching the head, checking valve clearances and whatnot took about an hour and half.
    Did I mention I was moving house while this was happening? Unfortunately whilst re-attaching the alternator I managed to strip the thread for its mounting bolt, and naturally finding an M7 bolt in Glossop on a Sunday afternoon was a non-starter, so I failed in my aim of moving the R4 to its new home under its own power and had to get the mechanic from work to tow it here instead.
     

    The cat's verdict on the Renault 4 parcel shelf: 'no BX, is it m8'.
     
    And once I'd attached the alternator, and replaced the relatively new Der Franzose fuel pump with a QH one that actually worked the R4 ran properly for the first time in a long while. Although admittedly there was quite a while when I didn't realise the hose connections were the opposite way round on the new pump and spent ages pumping fuel to the tank.
    Daily driver duties were then assumed.
     

  9. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad reacted to Cleon-Fonte in Exceeding BXpectations - Now With Added Renault 4   
    Time for the last year of R4 news.
    The first issues were all cooling related, the radiator was knackered and the cooling system full of sludge which one day started projectiling out of the expansion tank. A new Hella radiator was acquired for a mere £28 and the sludge eventually cleared out for fresh coolant (I assume you all know what a radiator looks like so I won't attach pictures). More problematic was the cooling fan which no longer seemed to work, probably due to the ridiculous wiring spaghetti previous owners installed to operate it. I chickened out of doing anything with this and paid a man to do it instead.
     

     
    I then replaced the faulty condensor with a new Der Franzose item which promptly killed most of my consumable ignition components, necessitating a full ignition service.

    It became clear as MoT time approached that some welding was going to be needed as there were some clearly obvious holes in the chassis side crossmembers.

    Luckily my friend runs a fabrication and welding business, as well as being an inverterate Morris Minor enthusiast. One of his long term projects is creating a full stainless steel floorpan for his Traveller (that can then serve as a template for either stainless or galvanised mild steel floorpans for customers' cars). In return for help removing the remains of the body from the chassis of the donor/project car he offered to do my welding.

    Angle grinders were thus wielded and this...
     

     
    ...turned into this.
     

     
    With that out of the way the R4 was brought in and welding began.
     

     

     
    The knackered track rod ends were replaced at the same time.
     

     
    Unfortunately the MoT man's hammer turned my front chassis leg into this.
     

     
    So it was back to the workshop.
     

     

     
    And a clean pass was acheived.
     

  10. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad reacted to Cleon-Fonte in Exceeding BXpectations - Now With Added Renault 4   
    With the pump and hydraulics done it was time to put the engine in, and this is where it all went wrong. Engine insertion was fairly straightforward, about half an hour to locate the engine and another hour or two of attaching ancillaries and suchlike. The engine fired and then it appears the cam pulley came loose, stopped turning and inevitable valve/piston interface occurred. The XUD is designed to transfer the force of such misfortune through the valves to the camshaft and its bearing caps and resultantly the cam was broken up and the caps shattered (maybe this engine was just desperate to be a quad cam).
    New XUD cam bearing caps are available but they need machining into the head, added to the cost and hassle of buying and fitting a camshaft I decided fitting a new head is the easier option in this case. Fortunately I have my regular BX parts supplier on hand and I took a trip to Peterborough to acquire a new old cylinder head. I took away from the experience that if you need a BX cylinder head, removing one from a beached example that's sat in the same spot for 15 years sinking into a bed of nettles is not the most straightforward or painless way to do it. Nonetheless, the head was eventually removed and brought north.
     

     
    And here's how it looked after a chemical bath and skim.
     

     
    Fitting it has proved less easy. Access is as usual appalling but the main problem is that the various fixtures and fittings on my car are all of a much poorer quality than those that came off the G-reg spares car. Whilst very little was seized and nothing rounded off on the older car, this was a regular occurrence on mine and working on things in the limited space available became a challenge. @chodweaver and I struggled valiantly to remove the head in situ but eventually came up against a turbo oil pipe that refused to let go, making it impossible to separate the head and block even though the head was loose.
    You can probably guess what happens next.
     

     
    I've been considering replacing my engine mounts with a set of wingnuts.
    Once I've made space in the shed work will begin to put everything back together as much as possible, before the engine goes back in again. Hopefully I'll be able to provide updates as I go along. For now, though, that's the BX pretty much up to date.
     
  11. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad reacted to 320touring in Exceeding BXpectations - Now With Added Renault 4   
    You and the rest of the GGG would be most welcome!
  12. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad reacted to Cleon-Fonte in Exceeding BXpectations - Now With Added Renault 4   
    Before reassembling one of these pumps there are two things to keep in mind.
    1. The major killer of any diesel injection system is dirt. It's therefore essential to keep the pump and all the parts within spotlessly clean at all times otherwise the pump will lead a very short life. Make sure the pump body and all its internal channels are well cleaned out before assembly.
    2. The pump uses fuel to lubricate itself but it will take a while for fuel to reach all areas of the pump, therefore all parts must be coated in oil or grease on assembly to avoid damage or seizure. I used red rubber grease designed for braking systems, which will resist water but dissolves rapidly in anything oil or silicone based. Greasing the parts will also keep corrosion at bay if the pump isn't to be used immediately. Don't be afraid of using too much, even if you lathered it on the ratio of grease to diesel will still be quite small once the pump is working.
    New parts for these pumps are readily available from Bosch and any number of diesel specialists up and down the country. Fortunately the only major components I needed to change were the feed pump and cam plate, everything else could be reused after a bit of cleaning and sanding. For instance here's the crusty feed pump cover from the last post.
     

     
    Reassembly is largely just a case of taking the various parts and dropping them in in the order they came out, then bolting down the distributor head. This picture gives you a clear view of the pump's internal workings, showing the feed pump cover, flyweight drive gear and roller assembly, cam plate and plunger, with the governor lever located on the control sleeve.
     

     
    The flyweights were then added...
     

     
    Then it was just a case of re-attaching the top of the pump. The top, in contrast to the main pump body, was in very good condition so I left it well alone. Reattaching it is the most fiddly and annoying part of the whole rebuild as trying to latch tiny hooks or springs you can't see onto various bits of the governor lever is not all that much fun. This is probably why I didn't take any pictures in between bouts of extreme swearing.
    Anyway, here's the finished article, which now turns over beautifully with strong 'compression' as the cam plate lifts off the rollers.
     

     
    The pump originally came with an electronic cold start timing advance solenoid, but none of the wiring for this was present on my engine. I did try and find an original BX mechanical cold start device but naturally it would be easier to find a gold rocking toothed hen, so I've removed the cold timing advance system altogether. XUDs do have a mechanical fast idle device on the cooling system thermostat and I hope this alone should be enough in cold weather, the advance systems only really help above 2,200rpm and I'd never be doing that in a cold diesel, anyway.
    Potential cold starting issues aside, this pump should work well.
  13. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad reacted to Cleon-Fonte in Exceeding BXpectations - Now With Added Renault 4   
    The next stage was to remove the roller ring. It too was in a bit of a state.

     

     
    Fortunately the condition of this is less critical and with a fair bit of cleaning it could be reused.
    With the driveshaft slotted out things only got worse. This is the cover for the feed pump.
     

     
    And here's the feed pump itself. Three of the four vanes were seized and it was clear they weren't going to unseize. Rust had also eaten large chunks of it so even with unseized vanes it was scrap.
     

     
    And with that I was left with the bare shell of a Bosch pump, seen here after all the rusty crap had been blasted away in readiness for final finishing.
     

     
    And here it is with a Renault 5 carburettor for entirely pointless comparison purposes.
     

     
    Next up, reassembly.
  14. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad reacted to Cleon-Fonte in Exceeding BXpectations - Now With Added Renault 4   
    Anybody remember this? Where were we up to?
    In the last BX update LHM was escaping from somewhere around the front subframe subframe due to a suspected leaking octopus, replacement of which sends dread into the most hardened and world-weary mechanics at the mere prospect. Fortunately the octopus was deemed leak free, unfortunately the leak was then discovered to be a T-piece further down the system which was definitely put in a very stupid place and definitely did require engine removal to access (the replacement part itself was a mere £1.20).
    So the inevitable happened...

     

     
    And since I had no desire to remove the engine every time a bit of pipework sprung a leak or a T-piece split I decided to do what Citroen should have done at the factory and move the pipework somewhere accessible. Further inspection of the octopus itself reveals it to be merely three T-pieces combined in one unit (see above), so at the same time I decided I may as well replace it with three proprietory T-pieces and some lengths of silicone tubing, thereby saving myself the £160 or whatever for a replacement when it eventually, inevitably fails.
    And here's the end result. Much better, I think you'll agree.

     
    In the next post we'll go through the other jobs I did while the engine was out and I had plenty of access.
  15. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad reacted to eddyramrod in Hairy Pussy - Swopsies done   
    How to start a New Year.
    Meet a Shiter you haven't met before.
    Relieve him of his car, that's out of MoT and been standing for months.
    Drive it 40 miles home and leave it at a nearby garage for major work that I can't do myself.
    The Shiter in question is Hillman Imp, and the car is the red Jaguar XJ8 Sport that he recently offered at no charge.  Well you can't turn that down, can you?

    Handover accomplished, on neutral ground.  Note the registration, that cued up the car's new name: Hairy Pussy.  If that doesn't suit a Sport-oriented Jaguar, what does?  So now that I've taken possession...

    Yes, the Woollard shot.  Has to be done.  No fuelling shot, because it didn't need any.  I've now dropped it at a nearby garage where the welding work will take place, and probably a couple of other small jobs it might need for MoT.  Updates to follow.
    Meanwhile, since I drove it back to Barrow, I can say it's a lovely car.  Yes, there are things that need doing, but it's pretty much plug-n-play.  Have a couple of snaps from my end of the journey.


  16. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad reacted to Ghosty in Concerto: Conclusion?   
    I think this sums up my current situation pretty well.
  17. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad reacted to Ghosty in Concerto: Conclusion?   
    Without any further ado, it's time to start stripping the head. 
    Rocker cover off:

    Contaminated oil, that's no surprise. Also, the valve clearances are the slackest I've seen, so I'll be doing the stem seals before I set those. 
    Rad out, expansion tank out, dizzy out, cam sensor out, intake out, all the pipes off the head, etc. 
    I get to the point of taking the belts off, and this is the big end pulley:

    The car had a cambelt about 10-12k miles and four years ago, but it's having another anyway, along with the water pump. I've got to have the cams out so might as well. 
    Dad suspects when the cambelt was last done, some monkey had a chain around the pulley.
    That pulley is just horrible, and also, the timing mark is in the wrong place with the cams locked TDC. That was weird. 
    ~wavy lines~
    Remember the white Civic? 
    Well, this time last year I was driving it on the M62 after doing its head gasket when it pressurised and shat all its coolant out. If it wasn't for the services a mile up that thing would have died on a smart motorway, either from being crashed into or a warped head. I'd have chosen warped head. HARD SHOULDERS ARE NECESSARY FOR SAFETY. FUCK SMART MOTORWAYS. 
    I didn't trust the engine anyway so that's when I put a 1.6 VTEC in it. 
    Never scrapped the old D14 though as I didn't have time. 

    Thank fuck:

    because that's useful. 
    Rattle gunned it off, and the one on the car. 
    The one on the Concerto was missing its woodruff key, and had slipped. WTF? 


    The pulleys are identical, but the Japanese made D14 pulley is significantly lighter, which is a nice little bonus. That can go on the Concerto, with its key.
    The old engine also yieded a dipstick, to replace a welded rod:


     
    and this threaded insert which goes off to the heater matrix, as the old one was full of some sort of clag. That coolant temp sensor looks pretty fresh, too.


     
    After some fucking about thanks to minor Rover/Honda design differences, the fuel rail and inlet manifold is off. Tomorrow, with the removal of an engine mount and the cambelt, the cams will be off and following them, the head. 

     
     
  18. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad got a reaction from keef in Lazy spotters thread   
    Whoa
     

     

  19. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad got a reaction from Fabergé Greggs in The Epic Austrian owned R16 from Germany doing French things in a Parallel Universe near England Saga   
    Look at the symbols for the heater controls!
     

     
    Amazing.
  20. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad got a reaction from strangeangel in 20:20(ad) vision. What will you be driving?   
    In that case, I'm going to turn my garden into a giant pond in an effort to cultivate some algae oil. So I'll say what I always say in these threads - Rover P6 3500. If the algae gets eaten by goldfish dropped from a plane by OPEC, then I'll have a homemade lashed together electric Minor Traveller, with the back full of lead acid batteries and a top speed of 15mph.
  21. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad got a reaction from brownnova in Chodmodestly 2019!!! September 1st Chumley Castle, Cheshire   
    1. Brownnova (& Mrs_brownnova)
    2. clayts450
    3. davidfowler2000
    4. skattrd
    5. chaseracer
    6. catsinthewelder (probably)
    7. strange angel
    8. Ghosty
    9. Beko1987 (probably)
    10. Sporty-shite (with junior_sporty)
    11. Dollywobbler
    12. Snagglepuss
    13. Fumbler ((With Brother_Fumbler) Probably)
    14. cms206
    15. eifion
    16. Squire Dawson
    17 Floatylight & Floatylight Jnr in his 2003 C3.
    18 BL Bloke
    19 Bucketeer
    20 loser-one
    21 NorthernMonkey+1
    22 SiC (Maybe)
    23 Wack
    24 JohnK
    25 RichBraith (tbc)
    26 Conrad D. Conelrad
  22. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad got a reaction from SiC in 320touring's major Morris manoeuvrings   
  23. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad got a reaction from djim in Mercedes W124 200E - Rolling Resto - More fettling   
    Gotta patch 'em all
  24. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad got a reaction from chodweaver in Welcome to the new forum! Here's some tips and tricks   
    I'm really happy that we finally got Skizzer's artwork as the forum logo proper. It looks great up there, doesn't it?
  25. Like
    Conrad D. Conelrad reacted to Skizzer in Welcome to the new forum! Here's some tips and tricks   
    As did I with the logo drawings - happy to do a Humber Sceptre, Daf Marathon and Renault 17 in homage.  It would be nice to change the cars in the logo from time to time; there are a few others already and I can do more.
    Loving the new look and proud to have contributed a little bit.
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