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  1. For as long as I can remember I have been aware of a dead K-prefix Mondeo saloon languishing on the drive of a house about two streets away from here. It had obviously been sat there for many years without moving. I kept meaning to drop a note through the door enquiring about it, but as always I never got round to it. Until now. With Bob the Renault 6 currently on hold pending a possible sale after lockdown and the Maxi mothballed due to lack of places to take it to I was getting bored, so last Friday I did just that. Things moved on very rapidly from there. Timeline: Saturday morning. I received a phone call from the owner's daughter, who informed me that her father had owned the car since it was 18 months old and cherished it for years, doing about 2 or 3 thousand miles a year in it until 2013, when it failed the MoT: Date tested 17 September 2013 Fail Mileage 70,926 miles Reason(s) for failure Service brake: efficiency below requirements (3.7.B.7) Brakes imbalanced across an axle (3.7.B.5b) He was told by the local garage he used that it would cost about £1000 to fix even if they could get the parts, which they said was doubtful. How can inefficient and unbalanced rear brakes cost that much to fix? And can Mondeo parts be unobtainium already? Maybe I will find out in due course. Anyway, he decided that was more than the car was worth but, being very attached to it, he simply parked it on the drive and left it there. Apparently he died about 3 years ago but his wife couldn't bear to see it go, so there it stayed until now. Coincidentally his wife died a few weeks ago, so I hope my approach didn't seem like grave robbing. Their daughter was planning to have the car taken away for scrap, so I was intending to offer her scrap value for it and see if it could be saved. However, she was so pleased at the prospect of her dad's beloved motor being revived that, without me making an offer, she immediately offered it to me for the princely sum of zero pounds. She also agreed that quicksilver and myself could work on it where it sat until such time as we could move it. She said that she would endeavour to find the V5 and the keys. Timeline: Saturday afternoon. Checking the registration online showed it to be a 2.0i Ghia, built in Belgium in May 1993 and registered in the UK on 15th June 1993. K prefix registrations ran from August 1992 to July 1993 but the Mondeo was not launched in the UK until 22nd March 1993, so had been in production less than three months, making this a very early Mark 1. Has been on SORN since September 2013. Let's go and see what we have. It's walking distance so that counts as exercise doesn't it ?. Didn't even know if it was a manual or an automatic. Turns out it's a 5-speed manual. Apart from flat tyres it doesn't look to bad from a distance. But what about the blind side next to the fence. Fortunately it had been parked far enough away to see it. Urgh! It's green instead of blue. Back of the roof has bloomed badly, but laquer doesn't appear to have peeled. We took a cordless tyre inflator so the first job was to attempt to pump the tyres up. We weren't very hopeful as it had been sitting here for 7 years. The two nearside tyres had 0psi in them, the offside front had about 7psi in it and the offside rear had about 12psi in it. They were all pumped up to a nominal 30psi and appeared to stay up. Timeline: Sunday afternoon. Let's take a bucket of soapy water round and give it a quick swill. Three tyres still up. Nearside rear flat again. 75% success rate. Not bad. Pumped the flat one back up again. Throw bucket of water over car and apply sponge and nylon brush. While washing it we noticed bubbles issuing from from a tiny pinhole in the bottom of the sidewall of the nearside rear tyre. That will be why it went flat again then. It looks like there may have been a thorn or a sharp piece of stone on the drive next to the bottom of the tyre and when it went completely flat the weight of the car pushed it through the sidewall. That's looking better. Not much more we can do without the keys as it's all locked up. Timeline: Monday morning. Another phone call from the daughter. She is at the house and has found the V5 and one key. Also handbook and service record. Thinks there may be another key somewhere. We wander round there and do the necessary paper work. It is now offically ours! Timeline: Monday afternoon. Send off new keeper slip and SORN declaration. This time we have to take the Zafira full of tools in an attempt to get it moving. It has been left with the handbrake on and the front discs look well rusty, so I bet the brakes have seized on. Takes 2 hands to lift the handbrake lever, then 2 hands to press the button and release the ratchet. Rock the car gently and, wonder of wonders, all four wheels appear to rotate. First hurdle overcome. Don't want to bore you guys but some of you might like to know our technique for attempting to revive a long-dead engine, honed at various Field of Dreams chod-tinkerings. Check oil and water levels. Oil looks pretty clean so probably serviced not long before it was laid up. Remove spark plugs. These all look in good condition. Pour a spoonful of engine oil into each cylinder just to give some extra bore lubrication on initial turn over. Engine compartment is so cramped that can't see an easy way to try and turn the engine with a spanner, so drop a long screwdriver into one of the spark plug holes so that it rests on top the piston, engage fourth gear and attempt to push the car down the drive, which fortunately has a reasonable downward slope. Watch the screwdriver and, sure enough, we see it rising. The engine isn't seized, thank goodness we don't have another Bob on our hands. Because the owner's other car was parked alongside we could not get the Zafira in to jump the battery so we connected up one of the two knackered old batteries we had brought round. Didn't want to risk connecting across a totally dead battery and shorting out the other one, so left the positive terminal connected to the original battery but disconnected the earth wires from the original battery and connected the negative jump lead to the isolated leads, thus removing the original battery from the system. Doing it this way ensures that the positive connections are still kept clear of any metalwork that could cause a short and the negative connection is earthed anyway, so doesn't matter if that touches any other metal. Turned on the ignition and, lo and behold, we have assorted dashboard warning lights. Hit the starter. Click. We were right, this battery is knackered. Try the other one. Whirr, whirr, the engine spins over. Let it spin until the oil pressure light goes out. Clean the plugs with a wire brush (not that they appeared to need it) and replace them. Reconnect the HT leads, making sure they are in the right order. Chug, chug, chug. Engine reluctantly turns over but not fast enough to fire. Remember we have a the tiny but powerful Chinese jump pack in the glove box of the Zafira, so this is deployed. Chug, chug, cough, splutter, BLOODY HELL IT'S ONLY RUNNING! Remove jump pack and it is still running on the alternator output. Leave it running while we check the condition of the spare wheel. Full size alloy, not one of these horrible space-saver things. Appears to have some air in it. Pump it up and fit it to the nearside rear. Try driving it up and down the drive to test the brakes. As we expected they were not great, but worked well enough to stop it eventually. Unfortunately the handbrake would also stop the car but the ratchet would not re-engage so having freed off the brakes it now insisted on rolling down the drive. So we took a deep breath and, leaving everything behind, we set off for home. No collection thread as the distance involved was about 500 yards, but target achieved with no problems, except for the power-assisted steering, which apparently now isn't. Have a cup of tea then walk back round to pile all the detritus back into the Zafira and drive it home. Gone. Mossy piece of tarmac blinking in the sunlight for the first time in 7 years. In its new home. Bob is not impressed by this non-French interloper and turns his back on it. Let's see what we have. Nicely mouldy steering wheel. Oh look, footwell lights. I say, how posh, did I mention it's a Ghia. Illuminated vanity mirrors. Can this get any posher? Optional giffer pack included. Lots of damp and mouldy boot trim now basking in the sunshine. So, what is the overall assessment. On cursory inspection it appears to have zero rot on the bodywork or the underside. Haven't tried everything yet. A few of the lights don't work (hopefully just bulbs or mouldy connections). Nor do the screenwashers. The two main problems seem to be the non-working power steering and the ABS warning light being on. But haven't had time for in-depth investigations yet, so here's hoping an MoT can be passed eventually. No rush, it is a lockdown project after all. By now I am sure you are all bored to death so I will stop rambling. Bloody hell these threads take a long time to compile. Stay tuned for more developments. Or not.
    143 points
  2. Hi all, you may recall i stomped off AS 6 months back after getting annoyed at the wanky moderation on here. Well I must have got over it to some extent, as i had been logging in from time to time recently, mostly to see what was on the for sale board, and guess whats happened? I've ended up with another car. I need more projects like I need a hole in my head, but this turned up on the FS board with no back wheels and no price and I was intrigued. Struck up a convo with @Snake Charmer who was looking after it on behalf of the owner Alan. It had been on Snake's driveway for 15 years and it seemed like it was 'out of sight out of mind' for Alan. Anyway photos were exchanged, I had a chat with Alan, more photos and videos came down the wire, then Alan said I could take it away for £1000 and pay after it was collected!!! Very decent of him. (I think he mostly just wanted a painless sale and a good home for it). At that price i could not refuse. So @worldofceri was drafted in for logistics, Snake refitted the rear wheels and home it came to castle bo11ox!!! I think both Snake and Alan are interested to see how I get on with it, so I'm chucking a thread up on here to record what happens with it (if anything). So lets have a look at it. So its a 1968 Zephyr Mk4, 2.5 Essex V6, 4-speed manual box and column gearchange. Snake has rebuilt the engine, and its got a new clutch and various other bits and bobs. It does run but doesnt drive as the rear calipers are dismantled and in the boot. Also the exhaust is rotten. I did bust out the mop on the bootlid and roof as well, I need to go right round it still. So far all I have really done is stare at it, I absolutely love how it looks. I always liked the shape of these and they seem to have avoided the crazy prices and knucklehead image of most old fords. Probably cos they supposedly drive like a half-burst lilo on the Whitley Bay Leisure pool. It seems amazingly unmolested really. Pretty much everything is present and correct. Stuff like the carpets and door seals etc do look like theyre 50 years old, but thats because they are right? I can't find any signs of it being welded amazingly - look at this flitch panel behind the NSF wheel. No splash guard - looks like it has the factory coating on it, yet all there is is a bit of surface rust. NS sill flange: Amazing! The only bits of rot I've found yet are the front wing tips and this little hole in the corner of the windscreen: That'll be a screen out job to sort, but I did find a company in Oz that make new screen seals so if I can get hold of one of those, the screen can be cut out to avoid another palaver like I had on the horsebo11ox. Amazingly this does not seem to have rotted out the bottom of the A pillar!!! Anyway the biggest problem is the lack of brakes. My driveway is sloped, so I've got the wheels chocked but with no brakes at all its completely immobile till i can get something sorted. The calipers were removed and dismantled some time back, heres how they look now: Snake reckoned they might be salvageable but looking through the bits I could only find one piston!!! (should be 2 obvs) Also, these calipers are pretty unusual, theyre the same as you get on a Rover P6 and they have some very weird mechanisms inside them. I decided I needed another pair of calipers 'intact' so that i could see exactly how they assemble and be sure I wasn't missing any other bits. @barrett put me onto some stammering geezer in Brighouse who has a stash of P6 parts so I had a trip up there and came back £70 lighter but with with 3 more calipers ("probably don't even need a rebuild m8") So today my workbench looks like this: Now I've got 5 calipers! on the far left there is one which I am planning to keep intact as a guide to how the thing assembles, the other 4 are now in bits. Also I found the missing piston. Also got 2 new seal kits. Now then, the real nub of the problem here is the pistons: All the pistons I have, are in really poor condition like these. Theyre a really weird design with that arm on one end and clipped inside is a female-threaded adjuster that wobbles about, check it out in the middle of this cross section: I noticed past parts sell reconned calipers for these/P6's so i thought they must have a source of new pistons, so I rang them up today. They reckoned they re-use pistons but bore out and re-sleeve the caliper bodies. I sat and thought about it and decided that sounded ridiculous - why fit a new sleeve, when the seal is static in the bore and the sealing surface is a moving piston? Then I sat in the garden for some hours wondering how I could get some new pistons machined up in stainless and how to attach those crank arms to them. I even opened one up to have a look inside: Didnt really come up with a satisfactory answer TBH. Then I had a brainwave when I realised that the main piston is not actually hydraulic at all!!! its the little one on the left of the X-section that is, that must be the one that PP resleeve. So actually, those miserable looking pistons will be perfectly OK after all. I will just clean them up as best I can and chuck loads of vaseline over them to protect them. I'm hoping I might be able to go up to Cobblers' place and get some of these bits cleaned in his ultrasonic cleaner before reassembling but hopefully i can get them back together in the next day or two either way. Also gave the backplates a clean up and a coat of red oxide & satin black (forgot to photo the finished jobs!) Ive got this week off work, booked it ages ago so I could do loads of horsebox stuff - Ive not touched that at all yet, as i am still in a 'love haze' with this Zephyr. More soon!
    136 points
  3. Oh ffs. Full write up tomorrow. Sufficient to say the three owners are like a big bunch of proud, happy, Gay Dads. It is also superior in most measurable ways to the Sierra.
    132 points
  4. As it turns out, the C6 was a dry run. This is the real thing - a 1973 Citroen SM. Being that it's me what bought it, it's the least desirable, worst-spec SM there is (because I am a beggar, and therefore cannot be a chooser). 3-speed slush-box; stupid federal front end, and a whole heap of rust. That said, it does have the 3.0L engine with triple Webers, and it's only done 49k miles. And it's an SM. Way I see it, it's win-win.
    127 points
  5. As you may have seen I'm in the process of buying a 1968 DS. Yesterday I went to see if I could get it running. There were no sparks, but a clean of the points sorted that. The fuel tank leaks so a temporary fuel supply was rigged. A bit of churning and she fired up. No LHM leaks so she raised right up. As soon as some iffy paperwork is sorted collection will occur. I'll keep this thread updated with the full horror that a cheap DS will inevitably reveal.
    113 points
  6. As this got so much interest on the News 24 thread i thought I'd start it's own one. During the week a friend of mine messaged me to ask if i knew if anyone in our car club was interested in a Mk1 Astra, he had meet them at Morrisons whilst in his 1940's Austin and they told him about the car that they had since new in the garage but due to old age and poor health it had to go, naturally i jumped at the chance even though i needed another car to a hole in the head. I popped round and meet them yesterday and learnt the story behind it, whilst staying in a hotel called the Albemarle Hotel in Scarborough in 1982 the receptionist asked if he fancied entering a competition to win a Vauxhall Astra, he filled it in, had a lovely family holiday and forgot all about it. 3 weeks later he gets a call telling him that he had won, he couldn't even remember entering! So they drove back to Scarborough from Ipswich again to collect their prize. He said the photo was in the Scarborough newspaper and the Ipswich Evening Star, he was so proud that he felt he couldn't ever sell it! Just lovely, obviously i took this opportunity to recreate this photo today! Such a lovely family, the car hasn't ran for a few years so the battery was flat but my small jump pack and some easy start soon got it firing into life, out of the garage and onto dad's trailer. It was at this point that it dropped it's water contents! this was the first time i'd seen the car outside and i had already paid for it and if I'm honest i was a little disappointed as the paintwork is a little patchy, i think it's had new wings and the colour match is piss poor and its had some arch repairs that aren't particularly painted well, but for a 40 year old Astra i probably should have expected that. To be fair it's pretty good really, we found the reason that it lost it's water was because the stat was solid with crystallised anti freeze and so was the water pump so I'll get them replaced. Shame about the zebartted engine bay but that's what has saved the car. It's only done 53000 miles, only 10000 of them was in the last 22 years! The interior is really good apart from the dash trim that's popped out, unfortunately the radio doesn't work and the aerial needs fitting but that's no biggy. and the very rare saloon boot!
    109 points
  7. Well... that escalated quickly. Thank you to Autoshite for once again being the enablers that you are. Now, which one of you horrible lot wants to buy my BX to make up for what you made me do?
    106 points
  8. 'Ey up, Belfast Luke here, thought it was about time I started documenting the life of a poor sod whose innocent love of chod has now become a full time actual grown up career. I started LMC Cars after leaving uni back in 2013 when I was a regular on here, immersing myself in this wonderful community where driving a Renault Vel Satis was acceptable. Made some cracking friends, who will already be familiar with my shenanigans through Facebook etc, but I really want to start documenting things properly as I do have some pretty unusual stuff passing through my hands. The business has amazingly gone from strength to strength, particularly over the last year, where I've been one of the lucky ones in this unpredictable world we currently live in. Forging a business out of my love for chod is honestly a dream come true, despite having to deal with the public on a daily basis. For example, yesterday I sold a 2008 Volvo V70 3.2 petrol and had a 2004 V70 2.0T Auto traded in by a fellow diesel hater. It's deals like this that make every "last price plz" tosspot almost tolerable Obviously, I can't trade full time in Protons and 90s Renaults (I actually have to give a warranty now!!!), but my stocking profile is very much "future shite". Exhibit A: I can tell myself "it's business, you're working" when I buy a Peugeot 407 3.0 V6 with a manual box on a salvage auction site and have it delivered to Belfast from Aberdeen 😇 I even try to follow the rule of shite with more modern "in demand" stuff. I have this C30 in stock at the moment. Why would I buy a smart looking R-Design when I can have some poverty magnificence to drive for a while!? That's the kind of Volvo we'll be all be pocket shuffling over in 20 years time, right!? Of course, having more space and more funds that can be psychologically justified as "business" has allowed my own collection of chod to be sustained and cultivated. I finally own that Mk1 BX I've stalked around Belfast since my uni days.... And I have a shoddy old stable full of completely unwanted shite. Every now and then I get something unusual traded in, like a Mitsubishi Colt with leather, and it just goes straight in the shed until it is shoved out again by something a little more unique....."shite gentrification", if you will. Click on that and you'll find more thrilling* content from when the monotony of lockdown drove me to buying a GoPro. I plan to maintain this as a shite documentary as and when I get time. I've missed this place and I look forward to sharing my dull tales of days jam-packed with MOTs, servicing, auctions, trade-ins and my, at times, very eccentric customer base. And just in case you wondered how glamorous the car sales business life is, this picture should tell you everything - A few months ago, I had not one, but TWO Chevrolet Lacettis in stock at once. GOD IS GOOD 😂
    101 points
  9. What do you get after 16 hours and 800 miles of driving on a Sunday to collect two cars? Well @sharley17194 picks up a 1997 Citreon AX from the depths of the Lakes on the North West coast past Keswick. However, we actually started the day by driving to just near Cromer on the East coast to pick up this! An Austin Montego poverty spec estate with a 1.3L A-series engine! Yes you did read that bit right! Yes I know the DVLA lists the model as 1.6... Yes its correctly registered as 1.3L. No I dont know if its a factory 1.3L! 😂 My favourite part of all this??? (Apart from the doom blue colour and the absolutely terrible interior!) 281,000 miles on the clock! Collection went really well and the below posts follows my initial assessment of what is quite frankly the best car I have ever purchased.
    100 points
  10. I think we can all agree that lockdown was a difficult time for many. With less actual work to do I had more time to take stock off just how many projects I have ongoing, realistically i don't have time to progress all of them as much as is needed - Red Rebel, Scimitar SS1, Capri, Boat, etc etc. Thinking about that was a bit depressing so instead I bought a small aluminium bodied electric car with a rotten steel space frame chassis and £1200 of missing batteries to add to the project queue! First three photos taken outside the previous owners house where its been sat since 2016 when he changed jobs and could no longer get to work on a single charge: And arrived back on the isle of wight for probably the first time since it was built here 45 years ago: Cheers, Dave
    100 points
  11. My Triumph Acclaim Avon Turbo!
    93 points
  12. Low effort thread warning: I bought this Galaxie after seeing it on the bay with ~10mins left to run. Coolest thing I've ever seen in my life but my goal for 2019 was to not buy any cars. One high adrenaline, guilty bid later and I've completely ruined my life. Called the guy up and asked could I drive it home. He said "not a hope in hell" It was in a barn in the US for 25yrs sitting and rotting. Imported to the UK in May 2019. Old mate was a classic rally man back in his day and had one exactly like this back in the 70s. He planned on restoring it but had a f*cking awful run of luck (ill health, son chopped his fingers off, garage burnt down with the seats in it). 39k miles. 390 cubic inches. Pillarless. 1966. It's had a new fuel tank, new wheels and tyres, new battery, new pipes, new brake cables and the drums rebuilt all around. I've found a lot of crazy stuff since buying it though - ran it for 100miles until I noticed no air filter. Found out the fuel tank wasn't sealed whilst I was on the motorway. The lights also intermittently turn off completely every so often which I found out at night. 1 hub cap fell off and nearly hit a man walking. Good: Chassis is solid. Interior is bone-dry. Drives straight and I think the engine runs well. No fluid leaks. Bad: Gear changes are insanely clunky. Dash is warped. Boot taking on water. Interior looks like it's had several generations of mice + a fire.
    89 points
  13. RobT

    Morris 1300

    As mentioned in News 24, last week I did a buy. It's effectively a two owner from new car, as the bloke I bought it from had only owned it for three months. He's got 13 other ADO16s, so decided he'd better have a clearout... As blind impulse purchases go I think I've done alright. The same giffer owned it from 1979, there's 69,900 on the clock, and it's only done 860 odd miles in 16 years. Oddly he kept getting it MoTd until 2017 despite it being exempt. The history is clean too, with only advisories for ball joint dust covers, CV gaitors, tyres perishing and a few other bits. Pics from the C&C advert. The idea was to buy something properly old for a change, and to tinker with it during lockdown to try and maintain some sanity. Let's see how long I last before I get bored or run out of skills! But my initial thoughts are this will be sticking around for a while.
    89 points
  14. On Tuesday I set off for the big Panda event near Milan in my 94 Panda. I’m taking a relatively easy route this year stopping in Reims and Besancon before going over the St Bernard into Italy and then driving down Lake Como. The return trip will be over Stelvio but heading to Zurich (to look at a car for a relative) and then heading home via Luxembourg and Belgium. Wish me luck, flying solo this year. I have done less 500 miles in this car over the last few years. The radiator gave up last week and when I started it up today and smoke bellowed from under the bonnet when I tested the headlights. Turns out the old dim dip resistor has burnt out so I’ve bypassed it until I can get another. Great start.
    88 points
  15. As you may have read elsewhere the purchase of a cheap DS fell through. So I've done something equally as daft and bought a slightly broken C6. It has a charging issue, but it made the trip home. Just. I'm hoping fixing the charge issue will rectify all the faults that pinged up on the screen on the way home. More tales of woe to come...
    88 points
  16. nigel bickle

    Sao Penza

    Those of you who know me/ my family know we favour oddities. Rare vehicles, not necessarily valuable, but in limited or non existent numbers. Circumstances mean that if such a vehicle appears, I will try to get someone else to save it, but if that fails, we’ll step in. That is what happened here. Some of you may know of young Jude Currie, from Surrey who has an interest in similar, predominantly Asiatic, motors. He had been hunting this car for some considerable time, and a bit of joint sleuthing narrowed the area, little by little. We knew it existed, or had done until recently, someplace in Poole or possibly Bournemouth. A little luck was had, when it was spotted on a street hunt. I helped Jude approach the Owner, who was surprised at the interest. Youthful exuberance raised the asking - but we all need to learn, eh! At least it stopped it being scrapped, which had seemed probable. The initial finder had first dibs, but turned it down. Jude went down, and spent some considerable time looking at it, but decided it was too much work for him. Although it was running well when he started, it now wouldn’t run evenly or tick over, and didn’t sound well. I had warned him about the pitfalls of running a long term layup, but - again youthful exuberance! So, I contacted the vendor, who was a little pissed off now. A Property Developer,( it came free with Bereavement purchase.)He drove it back to his, taken with the clean condition & low mileage (22,000) but unaware of its rarity. We chatted - I bought it unseen, based on Jude’s pics. A week or so later we headed down with the A frame, By now, it wouldn’t run, at all. We tried the usual, but it barely hiccupped. . But look at it! Funds changed hands, and the car was hitched up, returning to my barn without event. A few hours fettling had it running reasonably well. It’s principal problem was / is cold starts. Neat fuel dribbled into the carb gets it running, and gentle feathering gets it warm at which point it’ll drive,nreasonably. So, an MOT was booked as it’s first road trip -( we weren’t prepared to risk DVLA shenanigans for an unlicensed 25 yr gap) with no real idea how good the brakes were. Straight pass, first time. It’s near immaculate, aside from a few small blemishes on the bottom of the drivers door, exacerbated by by being taped over by the previous owner. I drove it home, parked up The next day I tried to start it - the cam belt failed! Instantly. Research said it’s non interference, so we stripped it off, replacing the water pump at the same time. Fingers crossed, it fired up fine-& that’s really the story to date. I’ve not taxed it, as I’m not up to using it right now, but it is dry/ safe-& and ready to go. Family concern for those irreplaceable wheel trims means they’re coming off. We’ve tracked a set of turbovecs which we’ll get tyres up & trial fit, for now - although this is one car I’d prefer to keep standard, where possible. It needs snagging. About 2 tankfuls, or 5-600 miles should sort the fuel system and settle the car down.Then the door bottom, and that’s it We’ll update, infrequently, when We’ve something to add.
    88 points
  17. Where's the Cadillac? The what? Come on man, the Cadillac, the Bluesmobile, where is it? I traded it. You traded a Cadillac for this? Actually no, I traded a Cadillac for this... Be honest, how many of you saw it coming? The reality is, it takes something like this to get me to part with Huggy. We met up and did the deed at Charnock Richard services on the M6. HMC - Matthew - is positively heroic, setting off at silly o'clock this morning in order to get there at almost exactly the same time I did. Now I'm home, but I bet he isn't yet. I hope he's having a comfy trip. Well I know he's comfy, it's not possible to be anything less on Huggy's seats, but you know what I mean. It feels very strange. No Cadillac! What's the matter with me? Well basically, decrepitude. I can't maintain a near-50-year-old car now. How good I am at maintaining an 18-year-old car remains to be seen. The Jag, which I'm naming Handsome (YVH = You're Very Handsome) is a lovely thing to drive. It's quite easy to get up to silly speeds though! I'll have to be careful with that. Even MrsR likes it.
    87 points
  18. Well the moment finally came where I could go out for a test drive. I chucked some basic tools in the boot and set off onto tarmac for the first time in 26 years. On the first drive I found a few niggles but nothing serious. Made some timing and tuning adjustments along the way. Returned to the workshop and fixed the niggles over the course of an afternoon. I've since completed a second drive and covered about 50 miles or so without issue. Very pleased with the car and will be sorting out some proper video footage now I know it works. Engine is really smooth and quiet, pulls well and happily does 70 and over without issue Gearbox was the right call, put it in 5th and its so much better at higher speeds, think its about 3k rpm or less at 70mph Suspension is very soft and smooth, no clunks or noises so far No serious rattles or fitment issues from the interior Can't feel any driveline vibration which was a relief as the prop and gearbox are not original Diff seems happy, there is a slight whine as you use the engine to slow down in 3rd Possible slight rattle from the exhaust over some bumps Electrics seem fine Temp is a quite low, I have a feeling the thermostat has stuck open, will investigate in future Even the speedo is accurate despite having a different gearbox Not used a drop of oil or coolant and so far there are no leaks Overall its not really put a foot wrong and has run a treat. Very very happy. There's a lot that can go wrong when all these bits have to start working. Other restorations have had me back in the workshop for days fixing issues. Pleased and relieved that my own car just worked! Here's some engine running stuff from the workshop after I'd finished some timing adjustments. 20210222_181255.mp4
    87 points
  19. Yeah, so this started with one of those slightly cryptic Facebook posts on a local classic car club group: Hmm. Maybe it's actually a 14 if it's really 40 years old? But absolutely none of those have been on my radar locally for at least 20 years. Possibly an 18? Enquiries were made and I tracked down the car: Ah, ok an actual 19 then, with suspected track rod end issues. Despite appearances, actually in regular use up until autumn 2019 when the insurance ran out and it was parked up. Go on then! Started up easy enough, helped by a newish looking battery, so I went back home to sort out insurance and obtain suitable transport for collection: I live on the fringes of St Helier, Jersey's main urban area. Nowhere's further than a modest bike ride away, but with the right route it can be a very rural experience: I would encourage anybody to come and pay a visit some time - the borders reopened in July and the island is welcoming visitors who are uneasy about France or Spain. Very quickly I find myself practically in the countryside. Some nice big old piles in between the fields: Unexpected tat hoard located, with 205 and Escort content: Onwards: And onto what passes for a main road for a bit. Back onto the lanes: And we're here. Owner has kindly extracted the R19 from the "garage". What you're seeing here is an older-style Jersey registration document, issued in 1998. The owner purchased this from the local Renner dealer (Bagot Road Garage, still trading today and still selling Renners) back in 1991! Paperwork completed, it's time to lob the bike in the back, loads of room in these with seats folded forwards. All right let's go! 114k on the odometer. The first thing I determine, other than the "something wrong in the steering department" is that this thing is somewhat electrically deficient. - Indicators = not functioning - Rear wiper = not functioning - Stereo = not functioning Which made me slightly concerned that the brake lamps might not be functioning. With half a tank of slightly stale pez I had no need for the filling station shot, but I pulled off the road (using Highway Code-approved hand signals) to lob some air in the tyres: Pleasingly, at this point I was able to identify that both brake lights (and both sidelamps) did indeed work as they should. That cheered me up a bit. Queue for a lane closure at roadworks allowed me to get a shite picture of this shite looking Fourtrak And we've made it home! That'll help keep house price valuations down to manageable levels. My wife doesn't know about this yet. She works three mornings a week so I'm going to sneak out to it when she's in the office, and gradually give it a good look over. So far however I've concluded that the nearside track rod is loose and knocking in the bellows where it meets the rack, therefore that's the first job to tackle before I think about notching up any more miles in it. Got a file with bills etc in - I'll leaf through that shortly and report back!
    86 points
  20. Completed the last few jobs for assembly. Been saving some of these jobs for the end of the build. Went around the car and applied the relevant stickers for stuff like coolant and sunroof etc. Also fitted the ford stickers to the sills. These are a reproduction item as originals cost very silly money. Filled the glovebox up with tat! Cleaned the vinyl roof The tyres on the car were an ancient set of Viking Norways from 1985. I needed 5 new tyres and decided to fit some period correct ones. These michelin's would have been fitted to Granada from new in 175, 185 and 195 sizes. Just like the old vikings these are full profile so they fill the arches nicely as before. These pics were taken after letting the car down off axle stands. It will sit better once it moves again. Fitted the new centre caps and trim rings. Been wanting to do that for months! The car is now finally built. Next job is test drives and checking everything. I expect some teething trouble but that's all part of the fun. Can't wait, its been 27 years since this car was last taxed. Before that I'm working with a professional detailer to finish and improve the polishing process. I need a lot more practice and knowledge on this subject so its great to work with a professional and learn how to properly polish a car.
    86 points
  21. This fourmonth hence, I hadde cause for to dispense with mine Vauxhalle Astra G, as mine goodwyfe had comment’d most unfavorably on the fucktonnes of blackest smoak that didst issue forth whence caning it throu’ the Mighty Thames tunnel at Blackwall, and didst cause her coiffe to smell most lamentably of unburn'd deasel-oile, acause the passenger window hadst dropp’d but a trifling hand-breadth. Alsoe, the rear offside bearing wast remonstrating dismally again, and I couldst not be fuck’d pulling the cunte off once more. I dost sweare, the mechanickal particulars vended by olde Mssr. Rottingdean at the sign of Eurasian Conveyance Partes are fabricat’d from the foullest rejects of Deptforde cheesemongers mix’d with fulsome nightsoil. Accordingly, I didst arrange to place a free-notification in the Oxforde Gazette, begging to informe gentlemen readers of the availability of myne goodly conveyance at a moste moderate sum of three guineas, for partes or repaire. Some days later, just afore the city waites cryed six of the clock in the past-noon, were I at leisure in mine studye-chamber whence I didst heare a sharpe knocke at mine door. Upon setting mine eye to the latch, I could see naught, yet again didst the knocke sound. I didst then unbolt the door, and aspied a smol boy in rags standing thereupon mine thresholde. Afore I couldst enquire of the nature of his errand, the whelp didst exclaim, “My master doth say, is thine item still available?” Confuzzled, I didst state, “Yea, if it is mine Astra 1.7 that thy master doth make query of, it is indeed still available.” At that, he didst turn and run down the staircase at Ax-Court and thence out into Whitehall. I tarried in the hall-way for quite some tyme, for to see if his master wouldst appear - but he didst never return. Most vexed, I didst turn and bolt the door, and return to perusing mine copy of The Auto-Trader, for to see if there were any Passat turbodiesels left that hadst not been shipp’d to Prussia. But not many moments had elaps’d afore another knocke came. I didst ope mine door once more, and t’was a different smol boy astood there wearing a most absurde cock’d hat. All he didst utter was, “My master doth say, what is thy best pryce?” Most affronted at the brazen-nose of the whelp, did I splutter, “Indeed, sirrah, you may informe thy master that mine Astra is price’d most moderately at three guineas, and I shalt not suffer cockchafing offeres.” And at that, the rascal dids’t turn and flee down the steps. But not many minutes later didst another rat-a-tat sound, and the smol boy with the hat did stand there most bold once more. Now all he didst utter was “My master doth say, one guinea tonight, goodsir”. Much taken abacke at this insolence, I didst boxe the cur’s ears by way of answer, and sent him howling backe out into the Mall. As I clos’d the door once more, Elisabeth didst appear from her embroidery-chamber with a goblet of good hock-wyne. “I hope thou art not planning for to go out to-night, Samuel, for thou knowest full well mine mother is to call upon us at eight bells for supper, and thou art to give her a lyft back to her rooms in Cheapeside thereafter.” I assure’d her that all messages coming forth were relat’d to sale of mine Astra, and that t’were all at her owne requeste that I were inviting this pestilence most foule upon myselfe, which in truthe were proving more tiresomely arduous than mine accursed bladder-stones. Over the next two houres, suffered I a further eighteen smol boys to come a-rapping upon mine door, all most curt and insolent, assortedly claiming their masters would fetch myne conveyance this very nyte for a most dismal low amount, or that their masters wish’d most keenly to purchase mine wondrous conveyance, even to pay a handsome bag of gold sovereigns for the great privilege, but they were sorely all fighting for Emperor Leopold in the Brabant, and wouldst thusly instruct for to send me mine gold directly via The Union of the Weste, if I wouldst but only supply mine detailes. Churls, mountebanks and niddy-noddys, to a man. In truth, afore longe mine knuckles were much bruis’d and most weary’d, acause of such ear-boxings was I obligat’d to discharge upon their sorry persons. No sooner had I chase’d one whelp whose master did beg to swop me an elderly bull-dog with but three legges, than a knocke didst sound once more from the hall-way. Sore vexed from such impish torment without cease, didst I wrench ope the door in great temper and chunter out, “Go forth and fuck thyself most heartily, foulsome fruit of a whore’s dung-hamper!” Thou mayst be sure that I had clean forgott that Elisabeth’s mother were due for to sup with us. T’were a frosty enough repast, with Elisabeth and her beldame eyeing mine selfe in most sour and silent fashion, and I were sore glad when I heard another knock to the door and had sound reason to exit the dining-chamber most swiftly. Past the vestibule, didst I encounter a sorry-lookyng wight, somewhat besmirch’d with dunge, tipping himselfe as Ignatius Scrool Esq, and begging leave for to view mine Astra, as it possesseth many of the qualities he was most desirous of in a conveyance; viz. that it were exceeding cheape. Calling through to mine goodwyfe that I wouldst not be outwith two shakes of a lambes’ tail, didst I usher Mssr Scrool downe the steppes to the back-yarde, where mine Astra had been park’d up. In an act most fortunate, t’were somewhat wette and darke out, so the lacquer-peele didst not show too badly. I didst start the Astra, which regrettably took longer to catche than optimal, all the while taking greate care not to draw the attention of mine buyer to the unfortunate plumes of smoak arising, and turning on the radio for to maske a grievous grindyng sound, that had appear’d only the day before. Mr Scrool didst pop the bonnett, and after a few moments of poking around beneathe, presently remark’d, “goodsir, the injector seales are fuck’d, here and here, and I daresay thy water-pumpe is on its last legges, going by the fuckyng noise herein.” I didst demur most forcefully, decrying him a cheeseparing scoundrel here for to beat me down to naught, for this fyne engine were in sounde healthe. But that I wouldst, in truth, accepte two guineas and six shillings for it. “Nay sir, not two guineas – not any guineas. Not a brass farthing. It runs lumpy as pig-knuckle porridge and stinks of deasel. I fear it is fuckyng fuck’d, and therefore of no account to me. I wilt bid thee a good-nyte.” And off he didst stride, leaving me standing most forlorn. Asudden, didst I then notice mine wyfe’s beldame approaching – quoth she, in high dudgeon, “Samuel, I desire to return to mine lodgings. Wilt thy shitte-boxe make it to Cheapeside, or shalt I just hail an Uber now, and save thee from making an even bigger pryck of thyselfe?” Stung by her wordes, I didst protest that I hath toatal faith in mine conveyance – and in mere minutes didst we pull out onto the main thoroughfare towards the Great Abbey of Westminster. Lamentably, afore we coulds’t cross the bridge, mine Astra did judder most alarmingly and make much smoak, causing a grievous loss of forwarde momentum, and I wert oblige’d for to pull over. Mine cross-mater didst depart the conveyance most volubly, calling hence, “I shoulde have knowne, Samuel, that thy automotive wanke-socke had no more integrity than thy spousal affections. Plainly, thine injector seales are well befouled and yet I daresay thou wilt yet buy another. Faith, knowest thou not by this pretty pass that all Vauxhalls are naught but shitt?” And, with that, she flagg’d down a passing cab forthwith, and didst exit over the bridge. Mortal wounded, I didst pop the bonnett and were near knock’d colde by the aroma of deasel arising thereof, and beneath the oile cap t’were clear signs of Black Death. As I stood forlorn, a smol boy of dim familiarity sporting an idiot cock’d hat didst scuttle past, calling over his shoulder, “Wouldst thou had taken mine master’s guinea now, cuntichops? Thy conveyance is not worth but a hogge’s turd!” In the ende, I push’d the fucker off the wharfe at Blackfriars into the Mighty Thames. A poxe upon the lotte of them. Fucke mine lyfe.
    85 points
  22. Evening all, After wanting to do this for many years I have bitten the bullet and made a start on my V8 Sierra project. I saw this heap on ebay last week, got some good advice on a thread I started which was mainly to leave it because it was overpriced and shit. I ignored this advice and went ahead with it because I'm an idiot. So yesterday morning this turned up at my door. Initial thought was 'what the fuck have I done?', the drivers window was hanging half open, the sunroof was open, the Mondeo alloys were horrible and it was filthy and rusty. Top tip, don't buy shite sight unseen because you're bored with lockdown. After a restorative cup of tea I started poking around to see exactly how bad it was. Window was off its runners but managed to get it aligned again, greased the rollers and it seems all right. My boys were amazed at the concept of windows you have to wind yourself. Sunroof closed up OK and keeps water out. The 90s car alarm was ripped straight out and consigned to the bin. I gave it a wash and had a good poke around the arches and underneath. The good points are the interior is complete and in pretty good shape, the body is structurally sound and I like the colour. The original engine, bumpers and wheels are long gone which is fine with me as i might feel a little bad doing this to some old giffer's pride and joy. The bad points are it's covered in dents, the bumpers are cracked and the paint is terrible in places. So the plan is to fit a 5.0 litre V8 from a 1995 Mustang. As luck would have it I got one of these a few months ago with the gearbox, propshaft and all the ancilliaries I could strip off the donor car.
    85 points
  23. Reveal time It's a citroen XM!
    85 points
  24. Bugger me. (not literally) Grub on, down the neck and @junkyarddog got it with the first guess. More or less. Oh well. Yes it's a Spartan Gulfstream 30ft motorhome although not made by Winnebago but by Spartan. Here ya go.
    85 points
  25. Crackers

    Cars of Crackers

    Collectioning has ensued. It's brown. She's running like a dream so far. One quick pez stop (not pictured) and now just paused for a quick check over before we hit the motorway. I'm in love. Better pics to come later.
    85 points
  26. You can never have too many project cars, right? Good job, then - this turned up this afternoon! I absolutely love it. It’s battered and bruised but that’s the whole point of a Panda is it not? Used and abused. More to follow 👀
    84 points
  27. I need to cut down on my screen time, I seem to spend far too much time on Facebook and AS. Yesterday was one of those times and I spotted a little Visa for sale very locally. It had been left semi abandoned in a yard and had disappeared under a row of conifer trees. The yard was being extended and the overgrown area cleared and out popped this little Citroen. All 652cc of it (2CV engine!) I was expecting a right rot box but amazingly I can’t find any real grot anywhere, the odd patch of sill has surface* rust which should clean up OK, the flange on the bulkhead where the spare wheel goes also looks a bit flakey and might need repair. It was last on the road in 2010 and drove to where it was parked, I’m unsure whether the engine has seized and the brakes are very stiff but fingers crossed it won’t be that bad. I left a deposit and I’m A framing the thing back home tomorrow. The keys are missing so I’ll have to remove the steering lock, I’ll then have to replace the locks or order a key, if that’s possible. Anyway, some photos..
    84 points
  28. I’ve decided to pull my various occasional shite exploits together in one thread, so that they are easier either to find or to avoid depending on your preference. This is that thread. Edit: Now also available on YouTube: By way of introduction, I have a dozen or so old cars in varying states of functionality, legality and obscurity. Most are from the 1970s and 1980s, which is definitely my era. Eight of them (and a Lancia that belongs to someone else) live in two sheds I rent near my home in South Wales. I am not a competent mechanic. That said, I’ll have a go, and I’ve learned a lot over the years (much of it from people on here). I also have a reasonable and growing collection of tools, some of which I have no idea how to use. I will post about how I get on with keeping the fleet alive.
    83 points
  29. It's only bloody gone and passed!!
    81 points
  30. Seeing as I slightly let the cat out of the bag to a few people at Cannock yesterday... Remember the halcyon days of Autoshite. Where discussion revolved around Tagoras, Tatras and Talbot Sambas. Where dismal motoring caught the imagination and dreams of Allard Clippers, Rapport Ritzs and Sao Penzas we’re on everyone’s lips... No me neither. But the love for the unloved has always been strong here. So ‘‘twas the night before Chumley, and all through the house... tea was being drunk at a rate of knots. During one boil of the kettle I idly flicked onto faceache marketplace. And there it was, listed two hours ago, in the next town over. A car from a country which no longer exists!! I showed it to mrs_brownnova and our pre-chumley houseguest Mr Dollywobbler. Excitement built as I tried to talk myself out if messaging the seller... I really don't need another car! The opportunity was too great, so messages were exchanged, and a viewing for Monday was arranged. It was both better and worse than in the pictures, we agreed a price but, I determined to sleep on it before committing fully. I awoke the following morning and it was almost the first thing on my mind when I awoke. A deposit was paid and now I am the owner of a Zastava Yugo 45A!! Glorious Yugoslavian motoring at its finest* The lowdown.... 1 owner from new and less than 29,000 miles. Taken off the road 18 months ago after “the brakes failed-but I can’t remember what it needs” Facebook stalking of the Yugo group suggests the seller was after a calliper 18 months ago. So probably that then. Also according to the seller “it ran perfectly when it was parked in the garage but now refuses to start.” Thankfully on viewing the engine turns well and I am hopeful that it should start with a little TLC. Underneath looks ok, not perfect but sills seem fine and I think a good under seal is in order. Bodywork is tatty and covered in awful cottage cheese repairs such as this... Interior is spotless! And it still has its complete Yugo toolkit!! Under the bonnet is remarkably clean too. So the next challenge is getting it home. Non-runner with no brakes, so can’t tow it on the rope or drive it. Trailer or A-Frame it is then. Except I have neither. Hoping I don’t end up hiring one for the sake of 8 miles! Plan is to get cracking on it over winter and have it back up and on the road ahead of FOTU next year. More updates when I get it home!!
    81 points
  31. I've done quite a bit more work since the last update. Over the past year or so since I painted it I've spent a lot of time with the car and got to know every defect no matter how small. Something I decided to do a while back was repaint both quarter panels when I had the opportunity. When I painted the car originally I had never done anything like it before. As a result my filler work was basic and only focused on areas I could see or feel. The results of that method are missing ripples and shallow dents. Once the paint goes all of them show up when you look down the side of the car. Now with more experience, the right tools, products and method I set to redoing the rear quarters. I rubbed them down with a long block which shows up all the highs and lows. Applied a skim of filler to the entire panel and then blocked it down. It's much more involved than that but you get the idea. I found lots of issues and worked hard over the course of 4 days to get them right. Primed the panels and blocked that back to prepare for paint. About two days to prime, prepare and paint. Much happier with it now. It won't look all that different in pictures but it really has made a massive improvement to the car. With that difficult and daunting task complete I flat and polished the panels to remove the orange peel. Then put everything back together, about a days work. Back on track I continued adding the final few parts. This is a factory under tray, not often seen in the UK but was an option on these cars. Cleaned up the jack and spare wheel hardware. Made and fitted the last bit of trim for the boot. This covers a void between the quarter panel and boot floor. It's originally filled with foam but I've left that out as it causes rust in the wheel arches. Finally I flat and polished the sills and ordered some new tyres. Very close now, perhaps another 8 hours of work and the car should be finished.
    81 points
  32. Boom!!! One brown Nova! My view as I walked out the front door... So yes, wasn’t too hard to work out that it is indeed a Brown Nova. The story of my username is that my very first car was a Brown Nova (but in SR hatchback flavour) and it was well known (and ridiculed) among my friends at the time. when @cms206 shared one for sale on my facespace I was determined to resist... but my willpower isn’t strong. So brown.... Massive respect to @worldofceri who had it at my door at 7am so I wasn’t late for work, quick look round suggests bodywork is not perfect but ok, interior looks pretty good. Has been dry stored for a long time, so recommission needed. P.O. says he had it running and driving before sale, time will tell. I’ll have a proper poke around later. But now I’m stuck in work wishing I was at home living out my teenage dreams in a Brown Nova!
    81 points
  33. plasticvandan

    1925 Trojan

    A rare thread from me, inspired by the super sentinel thread and now being on furlough for three months I thought I would start a thread on what I'm doing,though progress had been rapid so far so no doubt other projects will get done too! A bit if background,after years of wanting a vintage car,to complement his vintage bikes,my dad bought this 1925 Trojan Utility car in late 2018. A well known car with a trials history dating back to the late 1920s,heres a pic of it now and in 1929: Anyway the engine had supposedly had some work done on it before he got it and my dad drove it about three times before it cut out and had to be pushed back in the garage.on trying to start it (hand lever pull start) it got tighter and tighter until it locked up solid. Eventually he craned the engine out,a bizzare four piston but two Conrod 1488cc two stroke,and eventually managed to pull the crank out with pistons,it has a blind head as the block is all one piece,so no tappy action to be had at the piston end. Doing that in January combined with arthritis and a lack of enthusiasm,and the death of my grandad in June 2019,the engine has laid in bits strewn about the car ever since.Following my moving down to Dorset to live with him after my marriage breakup,I've long been meaning to get into it and sort it out once and for all,and now being off from Wednesday for three months,it was the perfect time. More to follow
    81 points
  34. I've just bought this. Came up on FB marketplace just down the road from my unit, couldn't say no! Do I need it? No. Will it cause me grief? Almost certainly yes. Is it a big majestic bastard? Absolutely. It needs a few bits and pieces doing, including spheres all round and some warning lights supposedly caused by an ABS sensor. My Lexia won't talk to it, so that's the first order of business. Wish me luck!
    80 points
  35. Back on the lorry, I cleaned up the new scuttle and uncovered a load of rust (surprise surprise) I don't mind the odd pinhole, but that was too much. So: Thats better Next, because I had chopped it out, the ends of the new scuttle were missing. I had to extend it to replace the bits 'left behind' in the scrap cab: Made it over-long with the idea that I would chop it down to fit. Had to do lots of measuring to be reasonably sure the 'extension' would sit comfortably against the front wing, the bulkhead and the scuttle drains. OK that will do!! Right there was not a lot else I could do with it at this stage. Had to get ready to start slicing the old bulkhead out. Started by draining the coolant: This was fresh coolant not long ago, now its black! I think I will bin it and clean the circuit out with a dishwasher tablet before refilling it. With the coolant drained and the expansion bottle off, I could get a good eyeful of the grot: Took the heater out. Every single cable and lever on this is seized solid. Will see if I can free them off, if not I have a spare heater box from the scrap cab (dont know if that is any better mind you) Eeeewwww! OK now we have good access to the whole bulkhead. Started working out and marking up where to slice this thing down to fit. measured up and scribed all the cut lines: After a lot of chopping I had this. I chopped it in 'half' as I want to do the job one side at a time so as to not feel too overwhelmed by the whole truck being in a million pieces!! Looks useful though right? Started marking up on the bulkhead as well; Lots of measuring and scribing Ooohhh!! Thats the malignant tissue excised (Yes i know it has gone metastatic) Nice big gaping hole in the cab now Offered it up. Needed quite a lot chopping off the 'extension' and a bit of fettling but was not too bad a fit. Not great though. Those vertical stiffening ribs actually don't line up all that well. I've got it clamped on that rectangular fan duct in the middle, if I align that, the vertical ribs are out by about 8mm at the outer edge! I did read that the metalwork on these is all over the shop. I think the bits that were common to the yankee van, were pressed in the states and sent to Dunstable. The Dodge 50-specific bits were tooled up in the UK. They had loads of problems because the yankee parts were off tooling that was already ancient and the parts were nowt like the drawings. So tooling up new parts to fit with them was a nightmare and it led to never-ending panel fit and cab assembly problems. Certainly there is a marked visible difference between these two scuttle panels. Anyway, after having it in and out half a dozen times I was happy with the fit Ias much as I was ever gonna be). I removed it and cleaned up all the edges ready for welding. Then I took a deep breath and stitched it in!!! Fucking BOOOOOOOMMMMM!!!!! After like 4 days of preparation it only took about half an hour to weld it in. I've still got to do the curvy bit at the outer edge but will get on that tomorrow. But, the bulkhead itself seems very satisfactory. Phew!! What a job!!! I can't wait to get it all cleaned up and a coat of paint and seam sealant on it. That will be a right mojo booster. Obvs I still have the drivers side to do but I'm hoping I can do that a little quicker now i've done it once already. Hopefully i will need less 'thinking time' on it. After all this high-intensity tat work over the last few days, the garage is looking like a total shit tip! I might invest an hour in sorting it out this weekend. Or I might not!!! More soon!!!
    80 points
  36. Feels like it’s not been used in a while wish me luck
    80 points
  37. I’ve not been on here much lately; I’ve moved house, gained a dog, have a longer commute to work and life’s sort of got in the way. Good to be back though! At the start of the year I had my trusty Mondeo, the Mk3 Astra convertible that came to SF18, my Mini that’s still asleep in my parents’ garage and the Simca, which is stored at a friend’s and I haven’t seen for ages. I moved house in April (after already moving in January ?) and needed a sensible commuting car, as we need two working cars between us and a garage quoted silly money to weld the Astra. So I bought Sigmund Fraud’s Dolomite 1300. That was great for 3 months and 2,000 miles but has developed annoying issues as detailed elsewhere. [I was going to insert an image here, but I have absolutely no idea how to do it on this new mobile site - so seemingly they’ll have to come at the end!] The arrival of two more cars means I now have five at home and I feel bad about taking up all of the parking outside the house. I also need money to repay the price of my latest arrival so it’s for sale, along with the Astra and, once they’ve gone, the Simca. With the Dolomite out of action, despite my best efforts, another daily was needed. My friend has always wanted a Saab, and last week I spotted a 900 convertible on Gumtree. It was very cheap, because the roof doesn’t work. Still useable as a coupe though, it had a new MOT and had been quite well looked after. It’s only a 2.0 NA “S”, so is quite a low spec, but still has leather (but not heated) and a trip computery thing etc. We bought it from the quite elderly second owner, who’d done only about 2,000 miles in the 8 years he’d had it. We had to change the starter motor immediately, due to user error (not by me!) - the spring in the ignition barrel has gone so you need to turn it back from ‘Start’ to ‘On’ once started or the motor runs continually. After being driven home with the starter on most of the way, it was dead. Replacement wasn’t as difficult as expected though. Other than that, we’ve given it a clean (the roof was horrible!), replaced the broken stereo, and repainted the screen surround and wheel trims. Just needs new badges and it’ll look quite smart! May attempt to fix the roof (or at least try to get rid of the CHECK LATCHES warning from the dashboard) at some point. Now, I’m sure I’ve mentioned before that my ultimate “first thing I’d buy if I had some money” car is an FD Ventora that used to be my dad’s. A history lesson: In March 1972, my uncle (Dad’s brother-in-law) bought WPA 506G, a 4-year old Vauxhall Ventora. He had a company car so only used it for family holidays and was keeping it nice for his retirement, which would be about 20 years later. He stopped using it at all in 1976, but kept under dust sheets in his garage. He died in 1989, before retirement and in 1992 my Dad bought the car from his sister. It had 18,000 miles at the time. I was 6 then, and we had it until I was 13. I loved being driven about in it, it was super cool and nobody else had one. I was devastated when it was sold, because we were moving house and would no longer have the garage. Since then I’ve attempted to keep an eye out for it and vowed to get it back one day. I last saw it in about 2008 though and, other than periodically checking it was still “taxed” etc, I’ve had no idea if its whereabouts. About six weeks ago, a picture of it cropped up on a Facebook group, still looking great. From there I got in touch with the current owner and arranged to meet him at a show so I could take some pictures and have a sit in it, but that, disappointingly, got cancelled. A couple of weeks later, he messaged me to say he fancied something else and was thinking of selling. My heart sank. I didn’t want anyone else to have it, but I have no money at all and the asking price was way out of reach. All I could do was politely decline and ask him to pass my details to the new owner. It was advertised within FD circles but, quite unsurprisingly, most either didn’t have the money or already had one. But he did receive one offer of the full asking price. He’d sold this guy a very nice original Victor 3.3 estate previously and was saddened when he put a V8 in and messed about with it. He’d been circling for a while and said he “already had an engine to go in the white one”. He didn’t want to sell it to him. I didn’t want him to either. But it would be a quick easy sale and I couldn’t do anything to stop it. He even offered me it for £1,000 less, but that’s not much help when you have very little. But I couldn’t get it out of my head. I had to save it. After explaining the situation to family, I was offered a loan for the reduced asking price. Should I? Of course I should. So, after modifying the shelving in my rented garage that I’m not allowed to modify, I collected it today. I still can’t believe it’s mine. It’s had about 4 owners since my Dad, and the mileage has doubled, to 45,000. It’s still 95% original but now has an upgraded water pump and radiator and a better carburettor (that cost nearly £500). A stainless exhaust and new tyres too, and it’s been meticulously maintained. The guy I bought it from absolutely loved it and his enthusiasm was very reassuring. The receipts prove he’s not making money on the car. Faults are limited to a stuck fuel sender making the gauge always read full, and I’d put the ugly cheapo seatbelts in that category too as they’ve inexplicably replaced the nice light grey Britax originals, that weren’t passed on a couple of owners ago. Replacements need to be sourced. Considering its age and originality, and that it’s been through a few owners since I lost touch with it, the condition is still fantastic. A small amount of barely noticeable lacquer peel in one area is about the only deterioration I can find, apart from what was already there 20 years ago. Yes, it uses a ridiculous amount of fuel. Yes, it handles like a cruise ship. Yes, I’ll be scared to use it or leave it anywhere out of sight. But I don’t care. It’s mine. And I’m keeping it.
    79 points
  38. As some may of seen in my other thread, I became the owner of a 1988 Fiat Croma I.E Super today, my first venture into old cars after passing my test in October! 32,000 miles from new, even have the original bill of sale for £8995! Needs some attention before I can start using it, most noticeably a lumpy idle, cut out on me a couple of times on the way home. Everything seems to work alright apart from the speedo which just jumps up and down at will and I’m pretty sure the steering is a lot heavier than it’s supposed to be so that’ll need looking at. I’m not to knowledgeable mechanically so I’m sure this’ll be a great learning curve*. As a side note anyone in the North East know any garages/mechanics that are knowledgeable on old shite. I’ve spoken to the Italian specialist in Ouseburn about the speedo and he was quite helpful but more than likely quite expensive going off his usual clientele of classic Alfa owners. I’m sure some of you here will appreciate the pix!
    79 points
  39. Haven’t found any rust. 75k on the clock. Runs super sweetly. Seats are like new, and incredibly comfortable. Interior plastics are the cheesiest ever, and brilliant. Haven’t driven it yet, because lockdown. I love it.
    79 points
  40. Car viewed, car collected, I approve, Fowler the Volvo expert approves. Now to drive it home!
    78 points
  41. To go with the big stupid Toyota Supra. Which decided to drop one of its repeater lenses on a road somewhere.. after randomly losing its nose badge at 70mph.. which are £100 used. Fucksake. ANYWAY, this is about another big stupid dumb white car with terrible MPG because I sure do love buying four hundred gallons of petrol at a time. I put my Range Rover L322 Supercharged on eBay because I fucking hate the thing and its millions of computers that throw a fit if the battery drops below a perfect voltage. Got very little in the way of interest, I had it priced correctly but no one is buying expensive RR's right now. Then some random bloke in Leeds messaged me with "you wouldn't happen to fancy a swap for a Cadillac would you?". WHY YES, YES I WOULD. BECAUSE I'M AN IDIOT. So, messaging happened, time arranged and off to Wetherby services I go as it's roughly a half way point and easy to get to, with plenty of parking since most of its services are closed. Met the bloke, we both liked each others vehicles so the V5's were filled out and we both went on our merry way in the swapped vehicles. THEN the Cadillac overheated, when it had driven there flawlessly. THEN he called me and told me the RR was throwing up gearbox faults, when it had driven there flawlessly. THEN the services I was cooling down at (half way home) with its lovely quiet car park suddenly had four police interceptors in it boxing in a druggie VW Golf. Right next to me. I did not take pictures, I did not think the angry looking officers would appreciate it... and the caddy was on another persons insurance temporarily so I didn't want them looking too closely at me anyway. THEN I got home, the radiator pin-holed and the rad cap failed. Explains the overheating at least. It's not a Northstar engine thank God so the HG's in this are pretty bullet proof. It's the 4.9L version of the wonderfully named "Cadillac High Technology Engine". ------------ So I left the gorgeous, hateful, wonderful, spiteful fucking thing in the workshop to be looked at another day. Will need a new radiator, may as well do the pump and thermostat and flush the tits off it too since the current coolant mix is 50/50 tap water/sand. Oh I should probably tell you what it is. It's a 1991 Cadillac Fleetwood, import so LHD, came from Florida and is pretty much rust free. Guy had young kids so it needs a deep clean, everything is sticky and disgusting. I only have the pics he sent me as I'm a lazy bastard and didn't take any of my own. I probably should at some point. My head tells me I need to sell it and recoup the money that was unwisely spent on the RR it replaced. But my heart tells me to keep it held in a death-grip and hiss like a xenomorph at anyone who tells me to sell it.
    77 points
  42. I'm now the proud* owner of this absolute heap. It's got a 2L petrol H20 engine in, the cab is mostly holes and the bed is knackered. I'm going to be fixing it over the next few months and getting it restored back to a decent standard, then building it into a proper motorhome. This one has been on Salvage Hunters once and handed about between buyers for the past few years. The current plan is to sort out the running gear and electrics. The bodywork, reupholstry etc will mostly be done in Morocco (I'm driving there to see my partners family in this...) once it's structurally sound enough. Everything that gets done with it will be documented in this thread. So far I've managed to find an engine manual and some info about parts cross compatability with the industrial H20 they put in forklifts, if anyone knows much about these do let me know... (Wheel distorted due to fisheye lens) I reckon the hardest part is picking a colour to respray it.
    75 points
  43. Mercedes Benz. What images does that throw up? Quality? Prestige? Elegance? Hewn from Granite? This is absolutely none of the above. A very quick intro as to the why: While looking for engines that run well on Veg oil, I discovered the OM606. Turns out this is both the most powerful and just about the last engine available in the UK that uses a mechanical injection pump, and hence is an ideal candidate for SVO. What vehicles were they fitted to.. well, the interesting one is the G-wagon of the late 90's, specifically the G-300TD. They cost HOW MUCH??? ok, I'm not getting one of those then. The OM606 was also fitted to the W210/S210 series of cars, which are much much cheaper. One evening, I put a silly bid on a W210 E300 saloon and stupidly won it. Cock. Ran that for a year. Surprisingly powerful car and one I instantly felt comfortable in. Unfortunately they're all automatic, which is not my preference, but that was the only real downside of the car. Some more on that one later maybe. After I'd had it for a year, it needed much more work than I was willing to put in, so I sold it for it's engine to a serial Land-Rover botherer and started looking for another car. Bought a diesel Mundaneo, which was then swiftly taken back for a refund because the high-pressure fuel pump was knackered. Looked for another car, and found an S210 for reasonably cheap. Got in it and said "aaahhh, that's better". So I bought it. It was cheap because it was a mess. Had to remove a lot of stupid chrome stickers, chrome headlamp surrounds, idiot "nurburgring" stickers, useless tuning box, and all manner of pointless AMG stickers from the interior. Once I'd ripped all that rubbish out it was a fairly decent car. The real reason for this post was the utter bodgery I had to implement to keep it on the road. Bodgery I'm fairly proud of, but bodgery nevertheless. First incident with detail: Front spring perch failure. A known issue on 210s, the front spring perch has a habit of rotting through and either detatching, or just completely giving up. Mine decided to completely give up. Driving away from work one evening there was a thunk, the NSF dipped a bit, and there was a clatter of mud falling off the car and blattering about under the floor. The car still drove in a straight line, so I did the most sensible thing I could: Ignore it completely and just drive. It was quite clear that the NSF was on it's bumpstop. This is what greeted me when I took the wheel off: That's not so clever. The spring has basically punched straight through the spring perch, hence the suspension being on it's stops. The spring just lifted out of position, leaving a mess of rotten steel behind: Crap. New spring perches are available, but they are £40, and I need the car back on the road PRONTO to get to work again. So, cut away all the rotten and wafer-thin steel to get back to the inner wheel arch: Now, I need a new spring perch. Time to get creative: No, I'm not making a saw: I am the king of the spring people: Employ hammer: I'm sure you can see where this is going. Weld that up and weld it into the car: Buzzzzzzzzz: Coat of zinc-based undercoat and then some bitumen top-coat and it's ready to go: The spring, being an avantgarde model (rather than the more softly sprung, Elegance or Classic) is short enough that you can just shove the lower arm down as far as you can by standing on it, and then beat the spring back onto it's mounting with a hammer. Went in no problem at all. The eagle-eyed out there may notice that the bottom end of the spring has a swipe of paint on the end. That is because I discovered it had recently broken the last 1" or so off the end of the coil. The easiest thing to do of course being to cut the end square and then splodge a bit of paint on it so no-one notices. The car never saw another MOT, so this was largely pointless, but it made me feel better. Only other casualty of the incident was the damper plastic cover: meh. Straightened it out again and shoved it back on the car. Was fine*. Load back on the front arm. The welds didn't rip apart, so I'll call that a success: Like all good projects, I made extensive use of CAD: That put the car back on the road, and it was still like that when I scrapped it for unrelated reasons many months later. Total cost was a few quid for some welding supplies and a few hours of time. Yes, I could have just bought a spring perch, but this was far more over-engineered. I'm fairly sure you could have picked up the entire car by that spring perch once I'd finished. So yes, this was "Engineered like no other car". But not in ways that the Mercedes Benz advert meant.
    75 points
  44. Yes, yes I do: One minibus. This has been sitting around in the work car park ever since I started working there, I've jokingly been asking "when are you going to let me have that unsightly minibus" for several years. Well... a few weeks back they said they wanted rid and did I actually want it? Like a tramp on chips mate, of course I do. It was mostly used by the sports and social club and failed its last MOT in 2019 for some fairly extensive sill rot on one side, likely caused by a scrape that was left unpainted. First course of action was to give it a good scrub using the fearsome diesel-fired hot pressure washer. Voila: That's a bit better. It drove back to my unit perfectly, started up first time after being stood for 2 years thanks to the solar trickle charger that had been left on it and even the brakes freed off without a problem. The best part is this: 43k, full service history and an almost full tank of diesel, which is worth more than the nominal donation to charity that was deemed an appropriate payment for this fine bus. Lovely! My plan is to convert it into a camper eventually, but before that I want to use it more or less as-is for some climbing/mountain biking trips. I've been able to insure it as a day van, so I need to get a fixed bed in within 90 days, but apart from that I just need to get the sill welded up for which I already have repair panels and we should be ready for an MOT.
    75 points
  45. We would like to announce some additions to the Administration team here on AS. Thank you to all who expressed interest in the available positions. We had a good range of responses to the request for help and really appreciate the time people put into their applications. Treasurer: Firstly can we place on record our thanks to @Stanky for the sterling work he has done. We are pleased to announce @Talbot will be taking over this role, with immediate effect. Moderators: Thanks also go to @Pillock for his time as a Moderator. From a really strong field, we have decided to add three new Moderators to the team, which will enable us to respond more quickly to requests and items needing attention. The broader collective view will be welcomed also in making administration decisions. We are pleased to announce that @NorthernMonkey, @Minimad5 and @dozeydustman will be joining the Moderator team, as of today.
    75 points
  46. Treated myself to a late 40th birthday present today. I'm mega excited, I've wanted a Sprint since being a kid, especially a yellow one so jumped on this when I was offered it. Drove down to Potters Bar this morning to view it and fell in love straight away, it's a million miles away from my old 1500 SE, it's a rip roaring monster which will probably financially ruined me bit it's worth it! It's being delivered by the owner on Tuesday as he gets free train travel and it saved me having to insure and going back again. Definitely my favourite car I've ever bought!
    75 points
  47. Hello and welcome to my first proper thread here. Purchased in August 2019 my lovely Rover 3500. I'd gone to look at it and made the brilliant mistake of taking my 8 year old son with me and while I had my doubts when the (pre warmed!) V8 coughed into life and we trundled it round the industrial estate the seller was based on my son was smitten and let's be honest my arm didn't need that much twisting. (I ignored the well patina interior and musty small ) A bit of a poke and and inspection (possibly a little less through than it should have been - it did have an MOT after all) and it was ours and delivery arranged - out of laziness and the fact I did t wan tto do an 80 mile return trip in an unknownor arrange lifts and logistics. Anyway in all its glory, random tyres and mismatched mirrors. Fetching no? The following Sunday morning arrived and so did the Rover and without the pre warmed engine it was a bit more interesting to shuffle it off the train,er and mou t the dropped kerb into my cul desac TADTS. Tho with swearing and a fair amount of choke it was managed and with her V5 it was taxed and ready for a quick spin. When warmed up it would move reasonably well and bar some hansel and gretel style oil trail behind it and a crumbly water pump was pretty pleased. A list of things needed doing. A good service and oil change. New non leaking non grumbling water pump. Some new tyres and the 3 different brands across the 4 on the road were pretty past it. clean the interior and find some new doorcards as well they were a bit warped and past it. Just a bit. No problem. Oil change and service first.. well th oil was nasty, I ended up flushing it with cheap oil and a new filter twice as I couldn't find oil with ZDDP ina bricks and mortar shop. However in the end it was no longer coming out after 50 miles black and opaque. New door cards were ordered in non matching black but tbh I was just glad to loose the completely knackered sandalwood ones. My choice was made food when I managed to snag a set of black leather front and rear seats for 30 quid on gumtree 2 weeks later. Driving was still a bit of a mixed bag even after new tyres, oil, filters and new waterpump as it didn't want to change down the 3 speed box. Ah.. that will be the broken kickdown cable then. No problem what was a bit of a pisser was poking round and finding less than stellar repair in the passenger footwell My own fault for mot poking deeper when I checked it out, I knew it had been plated and repaired but as my son would be sitting there I felt it needed fixing. And tbh he loves it and weighed up selling it and getting another, fixing it myself (🤣😂) or getting it done professionally and went for the latter. I can weld but only just and this was a bigger job than I was comfortable with by some massive margin - that and I wanted to drive it not have it in bits in the garage for 9 months! So it went away for a few weeks, rot was cut out and One side at a time tidied And new metal put in A few rattle cans and structurally made sound again. Since then it has been 3 thousand miles of pretty hassle free motoring. I managed to buy a donor car and steal the rest of the black interior out of it and some sundym tinted glass too as well as a few other odd and sods - including g a working clock But it was all delayed due to the wonderful year that is 2020. The plans for the future as soon as I've sorted a house (and garage!) are to finish replacing the std door glass with sundym, fit a new steering wheel new to me anyway perspex P4 sun visors and get the speedo calibrated and enjoy it as is. There are a few rust bubbles and scabby patches in the paint which has a mass of microblisters in it too but I quite like the look and patina on it as is for now, it's a decent 10- 15 foot paint job. I know the structure is solid and safe and the oil leaks have been cured after a damn good servicing and cleaning out the rocker cover breather tubes and fire traps.
    74 points
  48. so for those who might not know at long last I had my 3rd driving test today, and for those who do know are probably wondering just how it went! well im very pleased to announced, that finally after 2 years I finally passed my car driving test and now have a full Catagory B licence woo! heres the obligatory picture of the pass Certificate only 4 minors, Ill take that LOL im so please to have finally passed, Iv put so much time, effort and money into it, and its finally paid off!, 3rd times a charm literally (although 1st time with this instructor for what thats worth ) and there was so much riding on it (with my theory pass which was going to expire in January, but knowing there where just no practical driving test slots for the foreseeable future etc) its a massive weight off my shoulders now! speaking of instructors this is the website https://drivebetter.co.uk/ for the one which I passed my test with I do recommend her if you have someone in East London wanting to learn how to drive, if she can get me through a test I imagine she can get anyone through! heres the obligatory standing by car with pass certificate photo! so yeah finally passed Woo! I just need REV roadworthy and home and finally ill have some form own personal independence once more! Thank you to everyone who has been with/put up with/helped me through this whole roller coaster ride! its seriously appreciated
    73 points
  49. My new purchase a Rover 820Si Fastback with only 55k on the clock and headlight protectors apparently it was owned by a man who worked for Rover in Longbridge since 1946 and this was a retirement gift from the company. I have no reason to disbelieve this as the car has a Rover fleet registration either way its a Rover and i love it! Its been off the road since 2019 but shouldn't take me much to put it right once it arrives as first indications look good. Sills are solid brakes aren't ceased and it has a windscreen for starters. Oh and did i mention it has headlight protectors!!! I am planning to restore it once ive sorted the brakes on the Castle Gresley 820 wish me luck 👍
    73 points
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