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  1. I've just done something brave. I've imported a 31 year old Lancia. I had a Thema, it was a 16 valve TURBO, it was gold, it had lovely green alcantara, it would have been FAST had it ever worked, but sadly it was broken in many complex and headscratching ways. Having bought it on the promise of restoration, after some considerable time of it lurking in the back of his workshop like an ominous presence the gentleman I bought it from went "Bollox to this" and refunded me. So I no longer had a Thema. Sad times. Because although even having a broken Lancia Thema makes you cooler than the average person, it would be nice to have one that worked sometimes. So I resolved to find another. Not an easy task. And so here's Giovanni, a 1992 Thema V6. He's from the Netherlands, he was bought from a dealer in South Holland, and he has the 2.8 PRV engine (boo, I hear you Volvoists say, but this is a later, much better development with EFi, it sounds marvellous and Thema owners really rate it). Being Dutch, he also has the steering wheel on the correct side, though not for the UK which is backward. But we'll get used to that. He arrived in the dead of night on Sunday, and so far he's been confined to being reversed into the barn and a blast down the few hundred yards of farm track. He needs either a battery or an alternator, as he does not go without a jump and even running him for half an hour doesn't mean that he'll go again (spoiler; he won't), there's an exhaust leak which I think is coming from the centre pipe, and there's an indicator bulb out. After a bit of fettling he'll be in for a test and then I'll start the process of registering in the UK. Btw, he's named after Giovanni Falcone, the Sicilian anti Mafia prosecutor who was assassinated by the Corleonesi Mafia in the Capaci bombing one month to the day after this car was registered, in a convoy that included a couple of Themas. Anyway, have some pictures.
    77 points
  2. It only took 12 years! They're not the most popular of cars but the Ph2 Safrane with the volvo powerplants was always a winner with me. That is, until i removed the engine, put it back, couldn't get it to run, then got it going, then the cooling went, the head gasket followed. I really do have the worst luck with car engines / gearboxes and this one was certainly no exception despite being a Volvo. I'm not a mechanic so i've had to do a lot by trial / error. It's literally the most screwed up then fixed car on the planet. There's nothing on this car i've not buggered up somehow and then had to work out how to fix it and in the process it's cost me more than i'd care to admit. It's been the biggest pain in the arse a car could ever be but for some screwed up mental block of a reason, i couldn't part with it. On a positive note, i've learnt a lot from it that i need to learn when to quit. So the best course of action was to buy another (£600 jobbie - cars were cheap back then) which got scrapped after 8 months, then a 3rd which also got scrapped a couple of years later. I kept both engines (plus loads of other shit which recently got trashed too due to a house move) but I still had the 1st safrane. 7 years ago i put the 3rd's engine into it and that went the same way.. ran instantly but no cooling system despite coolant bleeding out of all the bleed holes. By this point i'd given away the 2nd engine so couldn't try that. Eventually I ended up swapping the head gasket out which was covered in mayo.. It was a pig of a job with it taking 5 weeks for the volvo dealers to even work out which gasket to order. The engine has far less space on the timing side than the volvo 850 so it was really tight in there and two of the bolts took a lot of head scratching. I got it done but despite the new head gasket, the cooling malfunction continued. Last year i had some luck when a couple of local lads came out and plugged in their snap-on kit for less than a penny. It locked up until i started the engine. One of them said he'd never seen that happen before and was stunned. Eventually it pointed to the coolant temp sensor which i knew was wrong as i'd replaced it twice! So they concluded that it had an electrical woe and i set about investigating the impossible again. I'm too embarrassed to tell you what it was but i shall say that it was something simple that i'd completely overlooked for over a decade. Sorted that, cooling fans worked again. All good right?.. well in all the passing years a few other gremlins had set in but i managed my way around those and 2 months after we'd moved again, i was able to collect it and take it for it's first MOT in over a decade. More pics - taken today! Just in the nick of time too. 2 days after the MOT my van went off the road again and so the car that the missus had disliked for years because "it's a fucking dead lump of metal" is now alive and slowly winning her back over now that it's doing school runs so she can still use her car for work. At 2.5L it's thirsty at 17mpg around town - that's 3.7miles per litre. 33mpg on a motorway is pretty much the maximum. Insurance is a pain too but i won't go there. So now i've got it fixed up and back on the road i shall have to SORN it again shortly and keep it as a spare motor.
    72 points
  3. Ohhhh, we're not done yet... Whilst all the wheels were off the ground and I was changing gears, every time I pressed the brake with my hand from outside the car the OSR wheel caught my eye as it was doing a strange thing. Turns out that the bottom arm bush is slaughtered and the wheel is moving around and actually hitting the inner well, mainly running at a toe out angle, dragging the tyre which will explain why the 10 year old Michelins with the same date code have about 5mm difference in tread between them. I really wonder where this car has been getting it's MOT's... I just can't figure it out? So, decision was made to poly bush the lot, which is on order and not being delivered on time. With the cars box now put back together, a short test drive was had, you know, because the rear wheel is about to rip off and no faults appeared. I then put the console back together to complete the car and take it on a decent run- slowly. I covered 10 miles and pulled up behind a parked lorry to overtake it, as I pulled away, GEARBOX FAULT! This was different though, The car hadn't gone into safe and was still running ok. Upon return, code P0705 hadn't returned, but instead it had traded for several others, one flagging a rear speed sensor. Given the work that was done on the car and as its been sat, the faults were noted and cleared. Now I've been using it every day just to ease it back into service and there has been no faults stored and we're all good. Desperately waiting on the bushes though. Chasing these tomorrow. The wheel nuts were expired. They swell up causing all sorts of issues trying to get them off. And the locking key was bent and almost destroyed, so I got black wheel nuts and had replacement locking ones. The wheels will be getting a refurb and going a bit darker in colour. The interior wood trim... I can't stand it on these cars. The S Type was meant to appeal to younger customers so they stuck old timer wood in it? No. My wood in this car is supposed to be Grey. The sun made sure it didn't stay like that. So I covered it to pretend it's not there. A nice tidy up of the interior, and it's a nice place for me to be. I also run a remote and RCA to the back which had to tap into the existing rear speakers so I could get a sub in the boot. I need a sub- always. I also changed all the interior lamps to LED as well as the number plate and front side light lamps. It brings it up to date and uses less power, generating less heat too which destroys the plastics surrounding the old lamps. Everything, even the AC works... I can't believe it. I've never had working AC in any of my cars (except the Disco, that was for the missis though). It sounds great, looks good and nearly smells good. I also discovered that this car has electric adjustable pedal box and wait for it... head restraints. Electric head restraints... Lets think about how good that is, and how necessary, for a moment. Next was to service the engine. No major issues there except for the oil filter not being included in a package and therefore arriving late and the plugs were all just over hand tight. There is a squeak from the ancillary drive belt area on cold start. The belt and tension look and feel good. I read that putting a smaller pully on the supercharger for moar HPs can cause belt squeak so I'd like this to be what's causing it rather than a worn belt. I haven't checked yet. There sounds like a manifold blow on heavy acceleration that I need to look into which is a shame as it muffles the supercharger noise so this must be sorted immediately! Speaking of which, where the car has been sat, opening the bonnet was like opening the crypt door... it was dusty in there and the supercharger casing had lost is luster. So I covered that too to pretend it's not happened and make it look brand new. Then I washed it for the first time for years yesterday and took it out for a show in the sun. After all that, I'm pleased with it and I'm happy to keep it. Moral of that story is : Keep buying massive liabilities, sight unseen.
    63 points
  4. Collectioned.
    41 points
  5. fairkens

    Collection mission

    Ta da! Big thanks to @davehedgehog31 Now I've got a long way to go and a short time to get there
    41 points
  6. Unfortunately, back in April of last year, my Granddad, the man who got me (and my brother Rich) into cars, and engines, and building, and welding, and all the other stuff that causes me so much trouble, passed away at the age of 84 (fairly ripe old age, given some of the stuff he got up to 😂 Over the years, he has been involved in all sorts of stuff that people on here might be interested in, not least of which is that from about the early/mid 60s, through to 1984, he, along with my Nan owned and ran a VW/Audi dealership, in Walsall in the West Midlands called 'Jem of Walsall' Nan passed away about 6 years ago, so now me and Rich have the interesting, hilarious, surprising, heartbreaking, confusing, annoying and all the other emotions you can think of task of clearing his house, garages and yard of a lifetime of car/boat/general tomfoolery. I am likely to have loads of stuff to post up here over the next few months as I uncover it (and actually find time to do so), and as long as people are finding it interesting, and want me to carry on, I will do so, as it doesnt seem right for none of this stuff to ever see the light of day again other than just within our family. Granddad took a load of cine film, so I will start with a few of those, as I think they might be of interest: First up is a general view around the garage, in 1969, in the snow: Next up, also in 1969, a little trip around one of the workshops, and the parts department: And lastly for this first instalment, slightly earlier I think, probably 66 or so, him tying some souvenirs bought on a cruise onto the roof of his Dads Rover, and then another shot of the front of the garage Makes me laugh, as his Dad checks the tying on in the exact same way as he has always checked any tying on we have done - I know where he got it from now 😁 Assuming anyone is interested at all, I will try and update this reasonably regularly (there are bloody loads of just cine films alone, let alone pictures, stuff we are finding in with his things etc etc) but obviously we are pretty busy actually sorting all this lot at the minute, as well as normal family life etc. Let me know what you think, whether people want me to keep posting things, and shout if any questions - I could chat about him till the cows come home - he was my hero, and I don't half miss him.... Jem Molyneux May 1937- April 2022
    38 points
  7. I didn’t need it as I’ve lots of old chod knocking about, but I saw this low mileage beauty on Facebook as I was looking for a cheap car for someone as their first car. I couldn’t remember the last time I saw a Mk1 Punto and it’s only done 49000. It’s clean as a whistle and apart from the short MOT and flat paint plus an oil leak from the camcover gasket it looks spot on. I picked it up for £450 which in this day and age seems good due to high scrap prices and just wondered if there’s anything to look for on an early Punto. I wouldn’t mind but I’ve since found out that my other half’s son found a car the other night and doesn’t need a motor now lol. I guess it will do as my station car now and I think 6 cars is enough lol. It drives well though and even came with a nice Bluetooth pioneer head unit that’s been professionally plumbed in.
    38 points
  8. The interior was also attended to. The front mats were removed and the cabin hoovered plenty work there for the hoover, but they came up really well! I also gave the driver and passenger seat an initial hoover, scrub and wet vac - still some work to do but significantly less mank The mats needed a stiff brush to remover the white dog hair, then hoovering before a scrub and second hoover to dry them out. Before After (laid out to dry in the sun) They look great back in! The back passenger compartment got pretty much the same treatment - mats out/brushed and hoovered and the carpet all swept and hoovered. The seats were all hoovered too If you look closely you can see the plastic discs that slide beneath the seat rails to locate the mats, and the poppers that let the two rear sections securely connect. They are belters of mats - @Jim Bell would barely be able to control himself if he were to see them in the flesh. there was plenty of detritus to be removed from the rear. after all that, the interior was a significantly more pleasant place to be - here we see @Supernaut enjoying* it
    37 points
  9. Acquired
    37 points
  10. 2023...Gearbox turns up with the missing arch liner. I was going to have a fair few parts off this doner car but given the service so far, I cancelled the other bits until the car was up and running correctly. I looked at the cars history again and nothing suggested it had been serviced since 2015, so I had that to organise and also be prepared to find the unexpected. Then there was the box fitting v's breaking and fitting parts. A ) If I got it fitted, I'm in 600 deep plus the service items, any other bits and of course the fitting won't include servicing that, with it's 'use this or it'll blow up special oil', maybe coding... Plus there was no Guarantee that the new box didn't have it's own issues, after all, it's came from a junk car. B ) On the other hand, I could break it and fit the Mech, service it and put it's oil in, get all the engine service stuff and have cash left over for breakages and coding. The only issue there is that if the operation doesn't work and I'd have to reclaim the mech, then I'd be dumping this new sacred oil and doing plan A anyway. I bit the bullet, decided to break the boxes and hope for the best. Here's the box with the Mech removed. You can also see the rectangular bridge seal on the right which should get replaced as they fracture, and the four rubber tubes c/left which harden up and shrink as I've just discovered! Lovely black oil in this box eh? And below, Here's the freshly serviced gearbox by the specialist. You can clearly see that this sump filter was changed really recently... nope, not at all and probably never. He had been at it though, I could tell by the fresh chisel marks around the fill plug. What you need to undo this fill plug is 1) a brain and 2) if you don't have the correct tool, make one by cutting down an Allen key. Clearly, they had neither. I swapped the mutilated fill plug with the good one off the replacement box. So I'll assume that the wrong oil has been put in there then, good job I am changing it eh? The swap of the Mech was messy but straight forward enough. Those rubber tubes I mentioned had shrunk so much that I could not see how they were sealing. I had replacements for a BMW box, exactly the same but the bridge seal needed a small plastic tab filed off. Filling the box whilst the engine was running was hilarious fun*. I changed it through the gears, and got those juices flowing before rechecking and adjusting the level. 6 litres of unknown weird red shit came out, 6.5 litres of special secret formula Jag gearbox oil went back in. It's worth noting that Aston Martin use this box as well, and they use Shell ATF in theirs. DINNER TIME!
    36 points
  11. Sailing from Portugal to Madeira? Completed it M9. Me and a mate have just sailed 500 miles from Faro to Porto Santo the longest passage either of us had done. It's 2.30 in the morning and we need beer and a fry up but for now it's rum o'clock.
    36 points
  12. A slightly stalled start to this year's motoring pursuits. The Mini was booked to go to the body man a few weeks ago, necessitating it being woken from a 14 month slumber. I went in a couple of weeks ago to start it and, with great recalcitrance, it decided to go brrooom brrooom. It ran on just a small percentage of its cylinders for a few minutes until I'd satisfied myself I'd be able to drive it two miles, and turned it off again. Returning to the car on the morning on the departure day revealed a vehicle that no longer wanted to operate as such. It would turn and turn but not fire. Having had both @alf892and I swear at it repeatedly, it was decided that it was probably the distributor. Or the coil. Both were changed, along with new leads and plugs and after a bit of head/arse scratching - she lives. This is the first time it's seen light since October 2021. Brakes are a little...err... spongey. The throttle is sticky and there's a fierce rasp to the rear section of exhaust. But, bouncing down the B1040 this morning, everything was wonderfully ok with the world. Having spoken to 'the man' we've decided that two new wings, half a new A-panel, a bonnet, a grille, two bumpers, all the sills and plenty of paint should do the job. I left it in some wonderfully shonky company at the yard, and hope to see it again in a few weeks.
    35 points
  13. theshadow

    new collection

    bought collected delivered,,22nd bought,delivered 30th,first class purchase from hmc shitemaster matt,ceri delivered,first class,more to follow....
    35 points
  14. Stopped at Tebay It's a vegetarian.
    35 points
  15. I crashed my pride and joy X200 into an animal. I was sad. It made me re-evaluate the car collection and look at options. The 635 had done zero for a few years, the Doozil Jag was doing school run stuff and now my Jag was also sad. To put the feelers out, I put the 635 up for sale on Ebay and sold it in a couple of days. I wasn't expecting that. The price I sold it for was pretty much what I wanted because... I had my eye on something. It was a 2002 Jaguar Green S type R. A car I had wanted for quite a while. As I looked at the images of it, things weren't right. The sills had been done but the covers were badly fitted, there were overspray marks on trim, No engine images, bits were missing and incorrect like the rear badges... It had been messed about with and I wasn't sure. Plus it was miles away. I spent a few days talking to the seller and looking at the pictures but I wasn't convinced enough to get it. There isn't many STR's available for 4 bags, in the early body and revised interior combo I wanted, so choices were limited to er... 1, the green one. That was until, the silver one turned up. At the other end of the spectrum, the silver one hadn't been messed with so to speak. It was original, had also had the sills done but was missing some random bits, like for example, the inner arch liner on the front there, in the image above. In fact, it hadn't been touched since 2016 as it had covered 2000 miles in that time and been Motted every year. What's the story there then? I'll tell you, because I bought it sight unseen, and then... found out. The seller was late delivering the car to his favorite Jaguar/ LR specialist who were going to deliver it, and we'll get onto them a bit later. The specialist rang from the pub on the Friday and said he had family commitments and couldn't deliver it due to it being late. I contacted the specialist on the next available day and he said that they had tried to load it and a Gearbox fault had developed. The specialist, without any permission, decided to read the codes, not tell me the codes, and look for a fix by using a part 'laying about here somewhere M8' I suggested that if he was going to do this 'out of pure generosity and to keep the sale happy for his M8', could he also change the box oil and filter whilst he was 'replacing a sensor' in it. What could go wrong? He's a specialist right? There were no further communications for 4 or 5 days and then after I contact them again, the seller said that he was waiting for parts. About a week later, I was getting a bit pissed off with the comms. The specialist was too busy to get right on it and was waiting for these parts, whatever they were- he never said, the seller had no idea what was going on and playing dumb and I certainly had no idea where my car was that I had paid for. Finally, I managed to re-secure a delivery date. It was to be delivered at my new place of employment, and I'd drive it home because it's a good car right? No. it turned up covered in webs, moss and mould with 4 squidgy tyres. But, it was home! Sort of. She was rough which is weird, because it doesn't look like that in the images. There were clues as to how long this car had been sat, mentioned above and the stale smell inside. Still, it ran ok and appeared to drive, so I taxed it and drove it about 2 miles to another site. I didn't get the excitement and mind blowing journey I had always imagined, no, it was slow and cautious. Something didn't feel right. Now, I'll give you a few minutes to digest that lot, make hilarious assumptions and I'll return after this break!
    33 points
  16. It's the arse end of January. I'm skint. What's that? There is local shite on Ebay. A cheeky bid. A wodge of regret. Let the games begin!
    33 points
  17. BEHOLD. An item as rare as hens teeth; a new Nissan Bluebird heater matrix!
    33 points
  18. So. As mentioned above, I had to go to Glasgow last week, and the 210 was never going to be able to do that journey. Mentioned this to the guy down at my local Merc specialist. "So, you need a car?" "Yes. Have you got one?" "There's a C-class outside. Only issue is it's a manual. Want it?" "Is it alright?" "Yeah, it's ok." "I'll have it". We found was that it was a few days out of MOT. So I inflate all the tyres, as they were a bit flat, pull as much dead tree out of the scuttle and rear boot area as I can, and run it up to the localish MOT centre. Left it with him on the Friday. Got a note on Saturday to say it had passed with one advisory of tyres close to the limit on one edge. Walked down there on Monday lunchtime from work, paid for the MOT and drove it away. Filled it with fuel that evening, and then on Tuesday morning loaded it up with kit and drove it 435 miles up to Glasgow. Still with green ick in all the trim lines and moss around some of the glass. DILLIGAF? I had an interim stop at a supplier just near PeatBogHorror, which is where I realised I'd not yet got a photo of it: Filthy, but functional wheels. Got up to my hotel that night, with a rather surprising statistic: Seriously? 45.1 MPG? I know it's "only" a 1.8, but it's a supercharged 1.8 with 140-ish BHP, and drives as such. The power delivery is really linear and smooth. It just feels like a 2.5-ish litre engine. And I wasn't dawdling about, as the average speed of 60MPH shows. Considering I had to faff about in town at this end and in PeatBogHorror, those figures are amazing. Assuming they are to be believed... Off to the customer, and shall I park as far away as I can? Nope, right in front of their door.. Looking even more dirty now. The motorways were absolutely filthy. I used an entire tank of screenwash on the journey. That's not saying a lot though as the tank appears to be only 2 litres from it's warning level to full-to-overflowing. So after having then faffed about somewhat around Glasgow, I needed fuel. The tankful came back with these statistics: Which were borne out with the tank-to-tank consumption calc. The fuel computer is accurate to within a few %, which is quite frankly amazing. Leaving the hotel on the Thursday morning, it would appear that all the cool* kids have cars with blacked out rear windows: TBH, I really don't like it. It's been done with tinting paper, so if I get a chance I'll get a hairdrier out and see if I can peel it off. At least from the side windows if not also from the rear windscreen, as I keep looking over my shoulder to be met with a much darker view of the road. Plus the auto-dip rear view mirror is having a bit of a hard time interpreting when there is a car behind. The rear window might not get removed, as I've head it can often tear the HRW elements off at the same time, which would be irritating, as they all work. The return journey was more of the same. Did part of it on Thursday evening after a simply superb Burns night dinner with the julaaaaars. Stayed overnight and visited another company (supplier this time) north of Manchester and then made the return journey home. I didn't quite make it all the way home on that tank, as I'd had a fair bit of mileage on the Thursday before driving down. Just at fill up, I had the best statistic so far: Which was for the leg down from the supplier to just into London. Yes, I was hypermileing it a bit, mainly to see what I could get out of it, but as the 57MPH average shows, I wasn't being absurd. It also seems like the Supercharger is a bit of a restriction below about 2kRPM, so best economy is had by keeping the engine above this. In several sections of 50mph road, this meant *not* being in top gear. It's the first supercharged engine I've ever really driven properly, so there's a learning curve for me to get the best out of it. That fuel-up gave another superb entire-tank consumption figure: Yet again borne out by the pump fuel reading. If driven sensibly, this is a shockingly economic car! Yes, you can get the figure down into the low 20s when schlepping about town, and if you're not on a long run, it's hard to get any more than mid-high 30s out of it. It seems to have a massive range of fuel economy. More so than I think just about any car I've owned before. Drive like a bellend? 18mpg. Hypermile on the motorway? 48mpg. So, a completely unknown car to me has just done 1130 miles with nothing more than 1 litre of oil added when the know-it-all display asked for it, and three entire tanks of screenwash. Oh, and about 120 litres of fuel. Which is amazing, as the E300 would probably have needed nearer 150 litres of diesel fuel for the same journey, at about 20p/litre more than the petrol needed for the C180K. I'm sure the main difference is the manual gearbox. You can almost feel the torque converter losses in the E300. That and the fact that the C180K is a much lighter car, and has better aerodynamics, being a saloon. And fractionally narrower tyres. But mainly the gearbox I think. ... which is a 6-speed. Initially this felt like it has too many ratios to me, and around town / B-roads, you feel like you're constantly changing gear. There were some points I agreed with W who sold me the car that it might be better as an automatic. But, after some experience with it, you tend to block-change an awful lot more than you would with a 5-speed box, which does give you more options. I found myself skipping gears all the time, especially where you can accelerate up to say 50mph, then block change from 3rd to 5th, or indeed if you're not quite at a full stop, you can use 2nd-4th-6th to accelerate onto a motorway or dual carriageway. A 5-speed box with the same ratios for 1st and top would have been quite adequate, but possibly not as flexible. TBH, it spent most of it's time in 6th gear with the cruise control set at a GPS-indicated 70mph (dash showed 71/72 or 115kmh) at which speed top gear is about 2300/2400 RPM, so ideal for keeping the supercharger spinning. It's been washed now, and looks amazing for a 18 year old 160k mile car. There's absolutely no rust I can find, no lacquer peel, no damaged trim, no significant scrapes or marks, no interior damage and no significant squeaks or rattles. The worst "damage" on the car is the gear knob is quite badly worn. That's it. It looks and drives like a car with half it's miles and years. As a car.. I would not have chosen it. The S210 is much more comfortable for me, and with it being a saloon is hopelessly inflexible (rear seats do not fold at all). However, as "an car", bought in bit of an emergency, it's been absolutely superb.
    31 points
  19. Had a bit of a happy find yesterday on my way home from the gym. Another house was having the garage cleared out, loads of old tools and stuff sat waiting for the scrap man, on top of which was a bright yellow trolley jack. I could do with a better jack and while this one hasn't got a handle, it's in otherwise reasonable shape on initial inspection. I'll know better when I actually use it, and the handle I have already fits it, looks to be a fairly new Halfords one. I was also in need of a lump hammer, now I have three. But wait, there's more! Two big metal tool boxes, the galvanised one is destined for Pat's van since it'll be a big improvement on the plastic buckets he's using. The blue cantilever one is for me, I've been after one this style for ages and all it needs is a bit of lubrication on the pivots since it's a bit stiff. Luckly there was half a tin of WD40 in the pile, so that'll sort that out. Several other bits and pieces including a nice multimeter with a good battery and the covers for the prongs still present, most of a roll of PTFE tape which is always useful, several Stanley (type) knives, and an odd old adjustable wrench that will be going in the Lanchester's tool kit. The 30m cable reel was really good to grab too since the extensions we have aren't quite long enough on their own to reach all the way to one of the hedges. The little 10m cable reel is a nice bonus. Can never have too many extensions. The little red metal socket set was a good find too. It's not premium, the sockets all say TAIWAN on them, but it's almost complete and the ratchet works well, even the spark plug socket has the rubber bit inside it. I've got a drawer full of random sockets so I can repopulate this one fully I reckon, bash the tin out straight, and that's a great little in-car set for the Maestro or the Princess. Combined imperial and metric, which is useful, three 10mm sockets, and the mythical 4.5mm socket I've heard about over the years and never actually seen. Not only that, there were some garden things too. I couldn't get the patio table, parasol, and chairs in the car unfortunately. Nor the reasonable condition old metal wheelbarrow, but I did grab a lovely old garden fork, some extendable loppers, and a few rolls of mesh which are all things we actually need for various garden things this year. Well chuffed with that haul and delighted to save what I could from scrap. There were some lovely old hand tools with the shaped wooden handles but sadly most of the files were snapped and rusty, and the chisels were absolutely destroyed. Had to draw the line somewhere. Don't want people thinking I'm a hoarder >.>
    31 points
  20. It's time to roll back the years! So feel free to view and/or download my collection of over 200 manufacturer brochures from the 70s and 80s. (A few are from the 90s.) All are in PDF format in mostly good quality. I'm adding to the list on a regular basis so let me know if you're interested in a specific make/model/year and I'll do my best to upload it. Enjoy! https://drive.google.com/drive/mobile/folders/1CcVaE5FmcNsYvVbSPcd-zI7O1q9KrWqk
    31 points
  21. Half arsed fleet update. Peugeot 205 The vegan 205 is happily smoking on as my commuting car. I didn't think I'd still have it by now, but damn it's just such a Good Thing in every possible way. And sometimes as an impromptu recovery vehicle. I'm still finding it less than keen to start when running on a high veg blend, although it runs well when warm. I've been doing various bits of tinkering to try and narrow this down. I started with the fuel lines. I mean .. Is that.. garden hose? Needless to say the whole lot was ripped out. I uprated the main feed line to 10mm bore and replaced the return line with the standard 8mm bore. Highly interesting photo of said fuel lines. I also took the fuel lifter thing out to clean the strainer. That was a quick job as it doesn't have a strainer. Next job was to make a modification to the fuel filter housing heat exchanger. Here I took the thermostat valve out of the side, cut most of it off, and blocked off the bypass hole. This should ensure that the fuel is heated constantly. A slightly filed down penny, sealed in place, is the ideal size to block the hole. Lastly, I fitted an electric lift pump, wired into a switched live so that it runs when you turn the key. The idea here is that it should help the veg along putting less strain on the system and so less likely to pull air in anywhere. I also treated it to an oil change since I have no idea when it was last done. The results are in and... no change. At least not to the cold start grumpiness. It does certainly run happier now when warm, and any hesitation disappears quicker thanks to the fuel being heated for longer. I feel there's more to be done here. I eliminated the fuel filter from the equation completely by fitting a generic canister filter in its place, which had no effect on the way it started. I'm still going on the assumption that air is getting into the lines when run on thick fuel, but to prove that theory I've got some clear fuel line to fit onto the pump so I can actually see what's going on. The 240 Not huge amounts to say here, it passed its MOT without any intervention from me, although it did get an advisory for underseal / corrosion which is an arse covering by the tester that really wound me up. There's not a single bit of corrosion on the whole underside. It enjoyed the snow. In fact a RWD Volvo is right at home in snow, better than anyone would expect. It got used whenever the gritters were out in force as frankly it's the only car I trust not to rust to hell. The most difficult thing about this car is convincing myself to drive it when I have a 205 runs on chip fat, but it still remains near the top of the list whenever I just want to go a drive. It hasn't really flung any shit my way. The temperature needle was a little bit low in the very cold weather. That'll be the thermostat then. There's a good few hours left in that. With that replaced I got ALL THE TEMPERATURES. Second minor niggle was trying to track down a slight bump/wobble at idle. It's not bad, certainly nowhere near being a misfire, but I'm a perfectionist arsehole and if something can be fixed I like to at least give it a shot. Despite replacing the injector seals last year, some of them seem a bit shagged. I stuck a new set on and didn't really notice any change. I thought the ignition was worth a look over as well. Since I put a set of £4 spark plugs in last year I thought I'd splash out and pay the full £12 for an official set. Again, no real change. I changed the HT leads last year, but the Bosch kit came with the wrong king lead. As a result I was running a lead which was [undefined] years old and probably could do with replacing. Top: old lead. Bottom: new incompatible lead. I set about hacking up some old leads in order to steal the crimp connectors and swap them over. Mint bro. Again, frustratingly, no change. All in though, it's a minor inconvenience and I've not got the inclination to start flinging tonnes of cash at it It did a fairly uneventful 800 mile trip down to Cannock via the Peak and Lake Districts at the new year, so as you can infer I'm just being a picky, ungrateful bastard. It's a phenomenal car and driving it is an absolute pleasure. The next minor project on it is to upgrade the wipers, as I find them horrendously slow even though they were all like that sir. Original wiper motors are basically impossible to find and in the region of £HFM. Doing some in-depth eBay scouring and wiring diagram perusal, I've found that the wiper motor from an S40 is one of the closest available. It uses the same control system and should be a bit less antiquated. It won't fit out of the box, but I'll make it fit. ENDS.
    31 points
  22. As the story of this car is highly Autoshite-centric, I have decided for your delectation to copypasta my existing thread on it from Pistonheads - with references and names updated appropriately where needed and some minor edits for this audience. Please do enjoy this rather sporadic tale of trackday-based silliness aboard one of GM's finest barges: (This part originally posted 10-Nov-18) So, the background.... A long time ago, in discussion with friend, fellow PHer and tame racing driver Synchromesh, we pondered: what about a trackday car that was 6 cylinder, RWD, manual..... but not another bloody BMW 3-Series? For the sheddy 328i "track slag innit" is somewhat like a clitoris these days..... Initial thoughts centered on a Jaguar S-type for ultimate incongruous hilarity. However, this was swiftly put paid to by a total lack of affordable off-the-shelf performance upgrades such as suspension and brakes. At the same time, chatting to good friend @horriblemercedes and mentioning the idea brought up another proposition - an Omega. Now, here was a cheap, relatively plentiful and very well-made car with a lot of potential. Due to their popularity as a drift barge and some mild parts sharing with the Holden Commodore, there was also a decent supply of brakes, coilovers etc available from performance suppliers. Fast forward several months, and with Synchromesh having been distracted by his own track car projects, myself and merc firmed up on the idea and started seriously looking for a V6 manual Omega. We quickly discovered that the fabled 3.0 MV6 model was now virtually unobtainable - at least, unless one wanted to spend several thousand pounds on one of the few remaining uncrashed or rust-free examples. Thoughts turned instead to the 2.5 V6 in standard trim, but the majority of these turned out to be comfortably specced automatic cruisers. Later on, we found out that the auto was standard on all V6s - manual was an option you had to deliberately tick, and what kind of idiot would do that on a motorway barge?* At this point, it was May 2017. I was studying for my final year exams at uni, and merc was busy with work commitments. With a lack of suitable cars forthcoming, and both of us rather skint, we put the idea on hold for the time being. *It turned out that back in 1999, one slightly strange buyer decided to spec a 2.5V6 CDX estate in Jewish Racing Gold, with a towbar.... and a manual gearbox! Fast forward to April 2018 and said JRG car was listed on Gumtree, with 66,000 miles, for the princely sum of £650. The original owner had turned out to be an elderly gentleman who didn't drive very much. He had sold it to the vendor - a chap who also didn't drive very much and was thus getting rid. The car had an excellent MOT history with nothing to note until the 2018 MOT. Merc spoke to the seller in Felixstowe on the phone and found out it was a manual (as the ad wasnt clear), and immediately left a deposit via bank transfer. That was that! The following weekend I went to stay at merc's house in Birmingham to make the trip to collect it together in my Jeep. We arrived in Felixstowe at around 10am on the Sunday morning to find a car that was great, barring some iffy colour matching on the offside wing and some minor trim defects. The V6 sounded great revving out and the underside was almost spotless. Merc insured and drove the Omega behind my Jeep the 260 miles back to my unit and we parked it up, to get back to our normal lives for the time being. For the next few months of the car's existence merc kept a diary, and this is how it goes: 19/05/2018 Driving back from Felixstowe to Cheshire, the brakes were clearly atrocious with a massive amount of slack travel before the pedal bit at all. The main piece of maintenance for today was to bleed them. The fluid that came out was awful. I got the nice job of sitting in the car and pumping the pedal while Matt released the bleed valves in turn until the fluid leaving the system looked fresh. In addition to this we also replaced the boot lift struts as they were totally flaccid (although a handy broom handle had been included in the sale!), the wipers and checked the scuttle for debris as that’s a weak point on the Omega for rust. We also added a solar battery charger. 04/08/2018 We came to the car to find the battery completely dead. Our main ambition for today had been to solve a central locking fault involving the driver’s door not locking/unlocking, which we originally believed to be a lubrication issue. We jump started the Omega from my Astra and set about dismantling the driver’s door card. After circa 15 minutes running, the Omega shut off suddenly and we found that there were no flickering dashboard lights. The car wouldn’t start from a known-good forklift battery so it was jump started from Matt’s Jeep, running sweetly. Feeling that the battery could have died, we decided to buy a brand new battery and unexpectedly this completely solved the central locking problem. We therefore fitted the single bonnet strut I had bought, assembled the driver’s door card, topped up the coolant, adjusted the throttle cable, fitted one of the two replacement exhaust rubber hangers I had bought, and unblocked a windscreen washer jet (using a straightened paper clip). The other main event of the day was trying the new 18” alloys Matt had collected for the car from a breaker’s yard, from an Astra H Twintop. They came with an odd mix of three Chinese ditchfinder tyres and one Michelin winter tyre. All were flat but have seemed to hold air since inflation. We also removed the solar charger we had attached on the previous maintenance session in case that had somehow killed our battery. 07/10/2018 I went to Evesham to collect a set of wheels Matt had found on eBay. Light, Lenso wheels (in the correct fitment!) with BTCC Dunlop slick tyres. The seller had had them on his tuned (538bhp!!!) Astra H VXR and turned out to be a really helpful guy, helping me diagnose a little stutter with my Astra H SRi Turbo 200 (turned out to be MAF sensor - I had to kick myself for not working that out myself!). He had enough components in the garage to build about half a dozen engines - he kept handing me all sorts of bits to look at - everything from forged rods and pistons to coilpacks. 28/10/18 Weightwatchers. We stripped out trim and the rear seats, but didn't get time to go much further. We also got chance to try the Lenso wheels and slick tyres we had bought, but unfortunately the bulbous sidewall on these tyres met the suspension strut on the front so we sold them and bought a set of Nankang NS-2Rs [entry-level track tyre] that Synchromesh happened to have spare. We kept these for future use with better suspension, and emergency spares in case the ditchfinders turned out to be unusable on track. At the end of the day we loaded the car onto the trailer and moved it home from the unit, ready for the upcoming track day. [When this picture was uploaded to PH, user McSam (another tame racing driver friend of ours), commented: "This in particular is offensively brilliant. Please get some spacers so you can run it like that, but be careful, as I expect few components on the car were designed for that kind of lateral acceleration 😆" ] Pictured here in the Hemi Jeep's natural habitat.... Now, to November 2018.... the first track outing was here, whether the car (and drivers!!!) were ready or not. As novices, we invited our friend Synchromesh along for support and a little guidance, which he did in exchange for the opportunity to check out the old girl for himself. It was a busy day at Oulton Park, with over 80 extremely varied cars being put through their paces. The Omega wasn't among the fastest but didn't embarrass itself immediately, either. Luckily the trackday was well-served with photographers! Pictured here is merc getting a bit of a slide on at a damp Lodge Corner, with a well-timed burst shot from the track snapper: Track virgin merc improved massively throughout the day, and towards the end was approaching the speed and commitment of myself (a 5 time track "veteran") and race driver Synchromesh. All three of us were very pleasantly surprised with several aspects of the car: - With a lot of weight stripped out of the interior, it wasnt as slow as we feared - The random ditchfinder combo gripped predictably enough and lasted all day without melting or falling apart - meaning we hadn't had to punish the still-standard suspension with sticky tyres - Although floaty, the handling was pleasingly viceless and encouraged you to push harder and harder. Then again, at launch in 1994 the Omega was praised for its ability to (and I quote directly from Autocar's Steve Sutcliffe) "run rings around the E34 525i"! Come 3.30pm, we were beginning to congratulate ourselves on a fault-free day with our untried elderly barge. No oil or water used, brakes (just about) holding up with regular cooling-off sessions, and no untoward rumbles or clonks. I went out for one final session with merc as a passenger....... and downchanging from 3rd to 2nd for Foulston's chicance, the car wouldn't go into gear. Thinking I'd missed a gear, I tried again - only to realise the the clutch pedal was firmly stuck to the floor. It dawned in my mind that something had gone drastically wrong, confirmed by a horrible grinding noise as the car finally slotted into gear. As we coasted to a halt in the runoff road and waited for the tow truck, further investigation and experimentation revealed that the car was fine when out of gear with the engine running, and went into gear fine with the engine turned off. So, all logic currently points to a disintegrated clutch or clutch release bearing. A sad end to an otherwise fantastic day, and as I write the car is currently sat at my local motorsport garage awaiting their assessment come Monday morning. Predictably (and understandably) I have spent all night weathering a variety of clutch-related banter from the others, but every cloud has a silver lining. If the original, 20 year old clutch had not disintegrated at the end of today and lost us the last 45 minutes of track time, it would probably have let go at the start of the next event. That would have been significantly more irritating! Additionally, today is probably the hardest the car has ever been driven in its life, and the clutch copped some serious abuse! Anyway, we've all come away having had a fantastic time today, and a long list of planned upgrades to slowly evolve the car into a full-fledged track machine. Roll on the next event!
    30 points
  23. Took the "scenic" route home last night and ended up in a few puddles. I knew it would be mucky but it was pitch black when I got back. Here's the result, no wonder the headlights didn't seem very good 😅
    30 points
  24. Now back from protracted spell at the menders, which mainly consisted of fitting electronic ignition, replacing a couple of brake pipes, and sorting out years of electrical bodgery. Runs and drives beautifully, with a complete absence of clonks, bangs and rattles Jobs to do… New door rubbers, front seats are intolerably uncomfortable, and a few localised body repairs.
    29 points
  25. As promised... FILTH (in both senses of the word) From 10ft.. not too bad, bit JDMYO... Enhance Mainly superficial and relatively easily tidied. The other side can't be as bad... Nevermind, onto the back.. FUCK IT, round the front.. JESUS H SHITTING CHRIST! did you not take your guide dog? At least it's dry inside: OH. clean and tidy at least? BASTARD At least the engine bay is tidy and the wiper arm doesn't foul on the bonnet.. THATS IT, ahm away back to bed😂 On the positive side: Drives lovely gearbox ace engine great Should come up well with a clean ELECTRIC CURTAINS!!!1!1!1! TIP RUNZ (try not to get it put into the scrap metal skip...) Double centre swivel seats/captains chairs
    29 points
  26. Ello pal, saving money starts by not going to see Jaguars. There are several reasoning methods to use here: How much do I need to buy a Jaguar Stype to use as a normal, safe, car? £1000 for repairs plus any asking price Is it broken? It will be broken It doesn't look broken? It's broken Will the seller lie to me? Yes, because it's broken Will they reduce the price if I turn up with ca$h? No, they believe you've swallowed lies that it's not broken and they know you've got the cash. Should I hold out and get a different one? Only if you can be bothered and it's less broken, because that'll be broken as well What about saving more and buying the best that I can afford? That'll be broken too, just painted better. Can I easily obtain parts for it? YES- buy it. Hope that helps.
    29 points
  27. in about 2007 my ex girlfriends slightly more buxom twin sister sent me a message on facebook to say that the dash lights didn't work on her car, she only lived round the corner so I popped round and it turned out she had just turned them down all the way with the dimmer, I'm not sure if she had done it on purpose or not but we ended up having a brief fling so I guess you could say that yes, I am a motoring enthusiast.
    28 points
  28. I was planning on going to France for Christmas and returning to Worksop for New Year but work got in the way and France was cancelled. Whilst talking to my friend in Worksop to arrange New Year, he asked if I had sourced a carb for the fergie, as he had found one in his stash. Dave is an agricultural engineer and has had his own business for about 40 years, having served his apprenticeship with a Massey Ferguson dealership, and is my go to expert on anything tractor or mower. As a result, when I went down for New Year, I hooked on the trailer and took the fergie with me! After sitting since May, it started remarkably easily but was still rough and smokey, but at least it drove onto the trailer. Eight hours and 400 miles later it was wheeled into Daves shed Here it was in good company with a 135 that Dave has been restoring and is now nearing completion Along with a 1953 David Brown 30C that was purchased new by his father in law and was laid up in the early 1970s when the block cracked due to a lack of draining or anti-freeze After years of searching Dave tracked down a crack free block (rare for these, they crack easily) and the engine has been rebuilt with new liners, pistons etc. Most of the holiday weekend we spent rebuilding it and on NYE we fired it up for the first time in over 50 years. When I left, the raadiator governor etc was on, and soon it will be ready for its first proper run. First we had a look at my fergie. The carb was removed, Dave took the top off and burst out laughing. One jet was completely missing! A lot of the rest of the carb was badly worn, so with mine and the one from Daves' stash, a good one was assembled. It instantly fired up and ran smoothly. Once warm, the smoke stopped and it ran like a sewing machine. We now think the engine was rebuilt but never run due to the previously mentioned distributor problems, and the excess smoke was just whilst the rings bedded in. With that done, the pick up hitch was fitted, the lift arms freed off and adjusted, the new grill fitted, new fan belt, footboards fitted as it only had the ankle breaker studs, a wing off a red 35 was painted grey and fitted and the bonnet properly secured. Brakes were stripped, cleaned and adjusted and the job declared a good one. I will take some better pictures in the morning. Now to source a decent tipping trailer......
    28 points
  29. Today's updatification: Didn't get a specific photo of it before doing other work, but I ended up cutting even more out of the floor of the car today. The repair that had been done previously had rubberised seam sealer slathered all over it, which of course did nothing to actually protect the steel from rotting, if anything it served to hold onto the wet and rot it out faster, so having peeled back more of that ghastly "sealant" there was more steel to remove! Getting bored of cutting bits out, and beginning to have some real risk of the floor moving so much I can't line it all back up again, it was time to start glueing bits together again, so the inner sill was cut back to a sensible shape: and a repair section welded in: I was still getting to grips with the 0.6mm wire and getting the welding settings right on this.. 0.6 mm wire is definitely a game changer on thin steel. I've always used 0.8 in the past as I had a massive free supply of it, but as I've now finished all that, I thought it time to get some 0.6mm wire, and treat myself to a new longer euro torch. This one has a rotatable head and is superb.. I now just need a longer earth clamp cable, as the lovely long torch is twice the length of the earth cable now! Here's the section I discovered and cut out, mentioned above: Got a bit cut ready to go in, but it was getting late, so I've opted to do that tomorrow. The other square patch is another area of rot that was found. Had to peel back the outer sill to get to it, and then let in a repair section. Did that one from inside the car as it was easier access: I'd not cleaned the steel up very well on that one, so the weld was a bit shit. Kept blowing through too as I failed to reduce my welding current for working "normally" as opposed to overhead as I had been with the last weld. Still, it's solid, and will be completely hidden with carpet on one side and zinc/bitumen paint on the other. Best kind of repair. Still need to re-manufacture the jacking point, as there's some larger sections of steel missing from there, do the other little bits and pieces and then weld on the outer sill. Then paint, and rustproof. Urgh!
    27 points
  30. A colleague with a 16-plate Audi A3 often tells me that he'll never buy a French car because they're unreliable. This evening, a small queue had formed on the way home from work. I thought perhaps there were some temporary lights in place. Got to the front of the queue and saw my colleague's A3 was the cause of the obstruction, just sat there with its hazard lights flashing. It turned out his state-of-the-art dual-clutch S-Tronic gearbox decided to completely lose drive and he has no breakdown cover. I towed his car back to the yard using my unreliable 25-year-old French car. Only just got back home having dropped him off at his house.
    27 points
  31. Well I sold the maxima and with a bit of a clash of styles, I immediately bought an Abarth 595 (aka a tuned up fiat 500) I was a bit reluctant to post it on the main forum as it’s not that old, but decided as the basic model was launched 16 years ago, that it was ok. It’s flawed, fun and not serious. I like it!
    26 points
  32. Off to an early start this morning..in hindsight choosing last night to "reconnect with my Irish heritage" by drinking too much Bushmills while watching the Banshees of Inisherin was a bad idea but we are where we are. Today's collection features a walk, a bus and 4 trains (fml) PC currently 2. Chickpeas will do that to a man.
    26 points
  33. Life with the ropey Boxster has been good so far. When 2 or less seats are needed, I’m using it as my main car. It’s a fantastic steer with a great soundtrack on the cheap (so far) and a brill heater. Add in a small cockpit and it’s a brilliant winter hack. The tyres are cheap brands (obv) and I’ve not really pushed through B road curves much as I don’t trust them, and I usually crash most roadsters I’ve owned so I’ve got form. Although the tyres are 255 section at the back so quite meaty for the modest power. I would image it would be utterly useless on snow. Some of these are very cosseted. This one never had been although it’s not covered many miles lately. I’m a big believer in using cars. I have previously commuted in 1937 Austin 7 (although it was just a few miles and no hills etc!) No doubt I looked like a right twat. Anyway I was hoping it might improve with use, particularly the idle from cold which used to drop off and then the car would cut out, until it was warm. I read about idle Control valves and mafs and decided just to use it and give a few longer, hard runs. Basically just to use it as it was designed to be. I thought maybe short runs and being shunted about and covered in a blanket lately had gummed up the idle valve or something like that. Wishful? Maybe. But it actually sorted the issue. Phew! It’s also been pissing water into the cabin which is not great down here in famously wet Tavistock, in a street parked old car. First I thought I’d sorted it as a drain Was blocked; but also the drain pans under the roof mechanism were not properly connected to the drainage tubes- it sounds like maybe a link piece had come off or gone astray. In the end I decided to try to fix it by taking some Evian bottles apart and using the inner nozzle part of the cap to seal the edge, bridge the gap and act as a mesh to prevent crap falling into and blocking the drain tubes. Bit of a cobble up but then it’s basically a banger Boxster in the hierarchy of Porsche boxsters. I used the inner nozzle that I dissected out of the cap (the bit that’s not pictured) Has it worked? I’ll let you know! A dash light also came on the other day in my peripheral vision, I braced myself before I looked down to find out what was amiss. ……. Low washer fluid level!
    26 points
  34. Time for an update! The aim with this car has always been to make it a reasonably comfortable daily driver, or at least something you could use as one. It's hardly been on the road in the last 12 years or so (maybe more) and this is partly because niggly faults haven't been sorted and jobs haven't been done right. It's also suffered from some shit modifications - to my eyes, anyway - and one of things I couldn't live with was this: No, not the swingball. The daft exhaust which some people refer to as 'wheelbarrow handle' type. When I was 17 I would have thought it was ace. It's really loud and snarly, but I'm 52 and just feel like even more of twat than normal making a noise like a bomber. Plus it's as boomy as you'd imagine on the motorway. Now sold on FB and replaced with this much more civilised stainless 'Stag' style jobbie: Still makes a decent growl but much quieter and uses the original exhaust mountings. I had to weld a bit more 2" pipe to the centre section so that it met my front pipe, but seems like you can MIG stainless perfectly happily. One of the original rear mount straps was still attached and usable. I made the other out of a piece of Land Rover axle check strap I had in stock. No pics, but the OS front overrider was falling off. Found it was cracked and broken so glued it back together and bolted the bumper, overrider and quarter panel back to the car properly, as it was hanging on by two bolts and a cable tie. Bodging twats. Gotta love em. The interior was a problem for me with this car from the start. The dash support, tunnel cover and knee pads were missing. The original seats were junked in 1998 for a hideous pair of what looked like cream leather ones, then changed again for vinyl buckets a couple of years ago. The buckets were OK, comfy enough but without much back support. They also wouldn't slide back and forth properly, probably because they'd been badly fitted. I decided to go back to original, and picked up these locally for too much money: They were as rank as they look. The driver's side frame had rotted through at the front right and the recline mechanism was seized, so I bought another two knackered black vinyl recliners for not much ££. The base foams were OKish, but the driver's seat had to be stripped completely anyway so I set to it and reduced it to the knackered frame on the left: Scrap, really. Luckily I had a good drivers' side frame from the black vinyl pair. I cleaned it up and welded the fabric tensioner bar back on: Meanwhile me and Mrs D set about restoring the houndstooth covers. Yes, those really manky knackered ones. New ones are about £500, so it's a good job Mrs D is handy with a needle and thread. I found a pretty good passenger side houndstooth seat base locally for a fiver, so replaced my own houndstooth base with that one and used the fabric to repair a mess like this: The seat back foam on the drivers seat was shagged: so I spent £50 on a new back foam from http://www.parklaneclassics.co.uk/index.htm and we got on with rebuilding the seats. The passenger seat back had been attacked by a cat which had used the base as its bed, but it started to respond to cleaning: Mrs D used some fabric to match and recover the damaged upper panel, and eventually we had it ready to fit: Getting the bucket out was a total cunt. It wouldn't slide, so I couldn't get at the bolt heads and had to grip them with moles and gradually loosen the nylocs. Filled the four superfluous holes in the floorpan with rubber grommets and worked out where the original seat would have mounted. Now slides and reclines as Triumph intended. Drivers' side took half the time once I knew what I was wrestling with: As you can see, they ain't perfect, but they're usable and comfy which is what matters to me. And they didn't cost £500... Here's how things used to look: Next exciting post - replacing the missing bits of interior
    26 points
  35. I spotted a book on ebay, start price £0.99 had 1 bid. I contacted the seller, explained my reasons and offered him £20 BIN. He accepted that I had prior claim in the circumstances and sold it me for a fiver. That's me, no 46. I won that race and it's verified inside. I lost my copy in an house move somehow.
    25 points
  36. Landed myself a job as a primary school IT assistant. Get in.
    25 points
  37. 25 points
  38. egg

    eBay tat volume 3.

    oooofff. https://www.carandclassic.com/auctions/1974-tatra-603-ii-nPdJOn?utm_source=LA&utm_campaign=auctions&utm_medium=referral
    25 points
  39. I went out this morning to unload the fergie off the trailer, let it warm up properly and take it for a run up and back down my drive. It rained a bit* last night after raining heavily for 95% of the journey home. A quick check showed the wind this morning had dried everything off, so full of confidence went to start it. Dead. Turned over fine but not a sign of life. After all the carb problems, I tried some brake cleaner but it remained dead. Removed the dizzy cap and could see no spark, a quick clean of the points and a spark returned, refitted the cap and it started first go. Unloaded it, let it warm up and took it for a run. Happy to report it ran fine, so it was returned to the barn. The first picture shows the pick up hitch arrangement and the others show it in its natural environment.
    25 points
  40. Cavcraft

    eBay tat volume 3.

    1997 MK3 vauxhaul Astra F | eBay 'NO mold in car' Hmm, not sure that's enough to convince me to buy it, M7. 'Has extra cigarette plugs zip tied under glove box wired to cigarette lighter'. Yeah, I mean like, that's ok but still not convinced, soz. Could you include a photograph of a bloke in an ill-fitting second hand tracksuit and size 27 Sports Direct trainers having a piss over a wall? Cash in the morning ok?
    24 points
  41. As the week has progressed, the novelty of cruising about in dog scented, belt squealing van has worn somewhat thin.. To whit, an attempt to rectify a fair few issues was made yesterday. Thanks to @jaypee @Supernaut and @captain_70s for their assistance at various points! The first thing that we found was: THAT FUCKING SQUEAK was an easy fix! @jaypee had found a forum post online saying that a sqeal from the alternator was usually due to a belt being too loose. The previous owner had just fitted new belts... @Supernaut found the tensioner bolt The belt was able to be turned to 90degrees initially, so we tightened it until it could only twist 45/50 degrees.. Result? No squeak and a full 14v at idle as soon as it starts. An additional fix was done to the negative connection on the battery so it clamps properly. The second thing we found out was that I am a time served panel beater... As it initially was After application of a hammer and dolly* (block of wood). @captain_70s stopped it popping open as I caressed it. Removed for further fettling Refitted and tweaked by hand It's not @GingerNuttz quality but it is fucking miles better, and worth at least 1mpg due to less drag🤣 I also went round some of the rust blebs, knocking them back then coating them with vactan before some primer. they need done properly but hopefully this will stop any further deterioration until I can complete them. @Supernaut also took a pass at the plastic headlamp lenses with polish. Before after
    23 points
  42. Coolant pipe swapped for a nice new stainless thing. And off it goes. Problems to be overcome : It wants the choke out a bit even when warm, otherwise it stalls. It likes to stall at junctions and won't restart without lots of cranking. I'm thinking the carb needs a good service. Apart from that it drives well apparently. No more scary steering and brakes!
    23 points
  43. Jim Bell

    The Dugmeat Rexton

    I hope it's all going well. Forts and Prayers lads. Forts and Prayers. Please deliver this man safely from his journey equipped with a new old car which is horrible, in jizzers name Arm Men. Please allow it to be a bargain with extra money off if the radio won't work in jizzers name Arm Men. Please hold him safely away from the big yellow taxi and the big orange taxi and fortify his balls so that they may be emptied of piss only twice on the voyage homeward in jizzers name Arm Men. By the dim dashboard glow of the farter, the bum and the holy boat. Arm men.
    23 points
  44. uk_senator

    Twinned car spots

    Some of the twins I`ve spotted over the last decade:
    23 points
  45. Speedy

    The new news 24 thread

    Hello, this is me! Been determined to find a 4G Civic since experiencing the joy of driving Ghosty's sedan quite a few times last year for various events and road trips. Ghosty saw it on Marketplace earlier this week, I was calm and considered with the seller who couldn't have been nicer, and actually ignored the 'I'll give you an insulting amount cash today mate' brigade because he clocked I was coming down from Manchestoh to view it. It would've been wrong to haggle him down even for a couple of hundred pounds given how positive the entire experience was. Other than a few small items which need some attention (non-oily, but I'll do filters, belts, fluids, water pump too) it's absolutely spot-on. It's in rude health and drives just like a happy one should. I'm absolutely over the moon with it.
    22 points
  46. In the Jag it uses a popular box, a ZF6HP26 which has many applications. There are slight differences but they all are pretty similar. My issue now was to get a hold of the brains within it, the Mechatronics. This is a large valve block of veins and sensors which include the ecu or the TCM as it's known in this case. There is talk that the TCM is married to the chassis number of the car it is installed in, and there is talk that close proximity parts do not need programming, or they might etc... In a nutshell, I was going to have to suck it and see because there is no answer. BUT, no one want's to sell a Mechatronics and be stuck with a gearbox paperweight so there is no financial benefit in breaking up the box into bits, I'm getting a whole box. Now, they look the same, but they aren't. But they might be, or not... I couldn't find that answer either. It seems that the Mechatronics is different as are the final drives in the respective models, the gearing bits... no idea. The boxes however are labeled up by engine size. So I bought a 4.2L supercharged box from 2003 which had done 30,000 miles less. With delivery, that was £460. Ok. Now, I had a choice. Do I break the boxes and swap the mechatronics over or do I swap the entire boxes over? I can't swap the boxes on the road outside my house, I mean, if there was an apocalypse and my sole survival depended on it, then maybe, if there was enough tea, but in the cold and wet... Na. I was quoted a book price of £600 to fit it. Things are adding up here ain't they? I messaged the seller and I wasn't remotely smiling. I discovered that the car had indeed been sat a long time. This is because the gearbox is fu... not working. The car had paperwork back before it was laid up for some serious engine ECU work by the owner before this clown, to sort a persistent EML, it had an EGR too and some other bits which all came to around 2large, can you imagine driving away from that and a month later the gearbox falls out? That's when it got sold to the aforementioned clown. 'Well it never done it while I had it'... yeah, you also haven't used it for years you tit. I explained that I'd traced the history of the car, discovered that he was a Trader and had previously tried to sell this car under his trading name, He also discovered that his M8 the specialist was a total douche bag who shouldn't be allowed near peoples or his cars, and demanded he give me the cost of the gearbox fitting or come and get the car. We sorted things out. Then I got a message... The gearbox has not been removed from the donor car and it won't be until after Christmas as this fella is 'too busy'! No words. He took me money quickly enough though. FFs. I called the box supplier... 'so when is it coming?'... 'dunno M8'... 'Sometime in January 2023?'... 'Er yeah sure. I'll let you know...' Jesus Christ. Oddly, the box was coming from the same area the bleedin car had come from and where the specialist was based. Is this how they do things there? Note to self... Never to go there... not far from Birmingham.
    22 points
  47. And yesterday as it wasn't raining I finished fitting the closing panel on the rebuilt door pillar and also ground back and coated any bare metal nearby. I now had no excuses left for not trying the door for size. Well for a 63 yr old car thats had a lot of it's structure replaced (at least twice) the door fits way better than I dare hope.
    22 points
  48. Rust Collector

    Twinned car spots

    It’s the answer to the question all my neighbours are asking; what’s better* than one tatty red BX estate? Two of course.
    22 points
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