Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/08/21 in all areas

  1. Well, a good long lie-in occurred yesterday, while I allowed my somewhat broken self to recuperate from what was rather more of an adventure than anticipated... I mean, it's not like I've not previously just leapt in the car and powered off to Galway apropos of very little, or trekked up and down between Edinburgh and Brighton, or flown to Scotland to collect a sight-unseen car... but this was when I was a lot younger, and probably rather more gung-ho about such things. I wasn't anticipating quite such a sensation of bone-tired weariness to seep right through me (though not sleepiness - despite the early start, I think there was too much adrenaline going on from the multiple travel links, the unfamiliar settings, and the doomful wet roads in a yet-to-be-proven car to make me feel tired in that way). It's been a weird couple of years, and I've pretty much gone nowhere and seen no-one since late 2019 in an effort to 'do my bit' and avoid spreading viral shiz around the place, so I think travelling and decision-making and being far, far out of the constrained little orbit I've been moving through for the past 20 months kinda took rather more out of me than I'd expected. But, overall, it was maybe a good thing to do. If I'd simply needed basic transport, I probably could have found something locally, but on some level I reckon I needed to prove to myself that I still retained the wherewithal to devise, activate and pull off a convoluted sequence of events. Captain of my own ship. Master of my own destiny. All that old bollocks. So, I guess that's what happened. Big thanks to @JimH for prepping the Outback for its journey into the west and dealing patiently with my queries (both about the car and about his Sentinel steam wagons, which totally blew me away and made the journey worthwhile just to see those alone) and to @SiC for tagging me in the original ad for the Outback - and to all of you who followed Saturday's live thread with encouragement and advice, plus a sprinkling of good-humoured piss-taking. It all really helped. First impressions are favourable. Removing the snow wheels from the boot has helped it sound a lot better in terms of stuff moving around, and although the front suspension continues to make the odd graunch and knock, I'll get some drop links on it very soon. Given that these are components that don't seem to last any length of time no matter what the price, is there any compelling reason not to fit cheap ones and basically consider them to be annual service items? Or should I steer clear from ECP's finest and get something elsewhere? At least they appear simple items that even my meagre talents should be able to fit unaided. The occasional chirp and squawk from beneath the bonnet seems to be an unhappy pulley on the aircon belt, which will also need replacing. At least there's a lot more room under the Outback's nose; I'm quite sure a similar job on the Forester would have required the radiator removed to even see the pulley. Bit of blebbage above the front screen, which will require some cack-handed amateur repairs at some stage... Bit of a scuff to one plastic wheelarch cover, too. May be repairable, may be replaceable. May just be something I learn to live with. The boot's a good size though - quite a bit more cavernous than the Forester, though sadly at some point the tonneau cover's stepped out for a walk and never returned. The cover from the Forester is too wide to fit this one, otherwise I'd have slotted it in. MrsDC seems enthused, and drove it back from the retail park last night. Despite being a normally aspirated car, the Outback still pulled pretty well compared to the Forester's turbo motor, and she commented that the clutch and gearchange both felt positive. The taller gears will take a small amount of getting used to - it seems happier to stay in third until approaching 40, and really fifth gear is only needed for speeds well above 50. But the road manners are good, and the brakes broadly comparable to its predecessor. The styling is elegant without being fussy, and anonymous while still being a little bit unusual. It fits the brief well. Seems to fit aesthetically with the rest of the fleet* too, both being 2005 Japanese cars. I still haven't gone through the weighty history file, or the owner's manual pack, but I'll look forward to doing that later and finding out more about this one's previous life in Scotland. More to come, doubtless...
    16 points
  2. DodgyBastard

    eBay tat volume 3.

    I've only gone and won it for £180!
    14 points
  3. Look at this gorgeous early bASe Saab 9000.
    13 points
  4. The very first E8000 to ever go through an MoT test in Greece made a little bit of history today at the KTEO testing centre on Syros. It passed with a few minor comments. All the engineers wanted a turn driving it and it was all done free of charge...it was an honour for them, they said. Giannos Goulandris was never given permission to even test the cars on the roads of Syros where they were made, let alone sell them in Greece. After the months of stress and bureaucratic unpleasantness, the car will get its new numberplates this week...the first road legal E8000 here. It's a lovely feeling.
    13 points
  5. Yesterday I was back in the shed and continued with the polishing. Basically everything below the waistline has now had a clean and a coat of polish. Once that was done, I lifted it higher to see just how good or otherwise the floorpan is. The previous owner to me said he had wire brushed and hammerited the lot when it was imported from the states, as it had never been welded and he wanted to keep it that way. I had no reason to dis-believe him, but as these are such a low car, it was hard to get a good look. The lift has solved that problem, and my faith in humanity* was rewarded when it was very obvious he had done as he said, although that was nearly 12 years ago! There were many areas of small rust blebs where the paint has suffered stone chips and surface rust has started. A going over with a wire brush in the angry grinder soon had the rust removed, although I only got 80% done before the battery died in the grinder Once the rust was gone, the entire floorpan was treated with Jenolite and left to dry An early night was required as I had an early start today. Up at 5am and away for 6am as I had to be near Lymm for just after lunch, and this was the transport of choice and necessity. 326 miles later, it ran beautifully and the run down was very pleasant indeed. It fully justified the small* amount of money I am spending on it this week. Currently in a travelodge (again), but at least the wifi is a bit quicker than at home!
    11 points
  6. A mate that also has a Civic sedan visited me to sell me some wheels.
    11 points
  7. Some progress on the Camry, fitted a new coil and... It started up fine!
    9 points
  8. Talbot

    The grumpy thread

    Fucssssakes!! I would have absolutely lost my shit at that. Last time someone threw anything at my car it was a young-ish kid who lobbed a tennis ball at me. I heaved on the anchors, ran back and gave him the roasting of a lifetime. I think he actually pissed himself. If he never throws anything at a car ever again, I'd call that a win. I was absolutely raging.
    9 points
  9. Skcat

    SKcats fleet, Japshow!

    After lusting over another old merc (I don't think the clk last year counts) I went about and collected one on Wednesday. I found it on the ebay shite forum and was curious about it. It had pervious sold for around £1000 but the seller apparently never collected it. I decided if it was a 1.8 I would not bother and if it was a 2.0 I would bid £750, I know someone will say the 1.8 Is not bad but I just feel short changed driving a merc with a engine smaller then a 2.0! I then thought about it more and put a bid on at £650 and laughed it off thinking "I will never win that" then I did! A buddy and me drove Into London to collect it, the guy seemed nice but ulez was the reason he was selling it. It was pitch black apart from the street lights. He could not open the boot, I just made sure it shifted into reverse and 1st then bought it! It is a bit of a knacker but its all the more fun for it, apon joining the w201 Facebook group you see all the posts saying you can't get one with a mot for under £1300 and see people selling a 1.8 manual for £3500 with no interested parties. And it makes you happy you get to try one out for such a little cost! The paint is shot, I'm too scared too try the sunroof, The thermostat has failed (I think this is the 4th car in a row to have a bad thermostat) and the handbrake does nothing. but all the windows go up and down, it shifts into gear... And it goes much faster then I should admit on a forum! I've not looked under it but so far it seems like a really solid example. It came with lots of paperwork and it seems like it was maintained extremely well up untill 2010. I'm not really sure what to do with it but so far I'm glad I've gotten it! Have a photo with me in it. If you guys want any photos in particular or know of any spots I should poke with a screwdriver let me know! Hopefully you guys will appreciate the weird pressed numberplate on the front too!
    8 points
  10. flat4alfa

    eBay tat volume 3.

    Relive your Dinky and Matchbox youth, in 1:1 scale https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/324827816030
    8 points
  11. All that's left for the 240 is to basically put everything back on. Fuel tank got a quick coat. Replaced the faulty in-tank fuel pump. Gave the sender tracks a good scrub with acetone and the readings are far more reliable. Full: Empty: Fuel pump tested with a battery and a bit of water. As you can see from the pools on the tank it works fine, and pumps in the right direction (some aftermarket pumps are wired in reverse). Last bit of the fuel tank puzzle is the front bracket which has started to deteriorate, so I made a copy. Exhaust and filler neck refitted. Tank fitted, new bracket in place. Brake lines cleaned up. New braided flexis. Underfloor pump tray refitted. Fuel lines refitted and clamped down. And the first oil change in 12 years! May as well treat it ( was cheaper than the cheap shite, to be fair!) The next job is to refit the rear axle. I'll also be pulling some bits and pieces off this veteran!
    8 points
  12. Weather was quite nice this weekend so I got a few bits done, not all fleet related though. The new voltage regulator for the 164 turned up so I fitted that yesterday - it's improved matters somewhat in that the battery light now comes on when the ignition is switched on, but it doesn't go out when the engine is started. I tried flashing the field as suggested on the Ask a Shiter forum, but that hasn't made any difference. So it looks like I'm going to have to fork out for a new alternator - I might wait until after Christmas though, the car won't be going any further than a battery-charge's worth over the next few months. I also taxed the car, for the first time in nearly 10 years. This afternoon was the big annual garage changeover - the Innocenti has come out of the garage and is residing on the driveway for now, and the Renault 6 and the boat have gone away into the dry for the winter. This necessitated a lot of rearranging of junk, and the Picasso has taken on the role of temporary shed for the time being. The Volvo is currently parked on the road until alternative arrangements can be made. At the moment there are three pushbikes in the garage where the Spacy normally lives - I may find a new home for those or I may just leave the Spacy on the patio for now with the bargain £3.99 motorbike cover I picked up from the Middle of Lidl the other day. I really do need another van though... Also had a nice chat with my neighbour down the road who's recently bought himself a 1970 Austin 1100. It'd been stood for a while and needed a good polish and a new set of tyres, but it's a surprisingly solid old thing and he reckons it drives nicely. He'd just had the suspension pumped up by a garage in the next village that has a Dalek. He paid £1200 for it which sounds pretty reasonable to me.
    8 points
  13. A nice run up the coast in the Skoda, seems to be running better after pissing about with the SU carb. I noticed a pipe with nothing fitted onto it, I tried plugging it up with a bit of hose with a bolt screwed into it which made a huge difference to how the engine ran through the rev range with more torque and no flat spots but when the revs dropped to idle it would start to hunt and occasionally cut out. With the tube unplugged it would idle at 2k and felt a bit crap throughout the rev range. On other cars that use SU carbs it said the tube was for a crankcase breather so I tried connecting it to a tube coming from the rocker cover which improved things massively, it's run fine up through the rev range and no longer wants to cut out at idle.
    8 points
  14. wuvvum

    eBay tat volume 3.

    Field find Sherpa pickup
    7 points
  15. X914VSF in Imperial Blue. August 2005. 2nd car I owned. Worked every hour I could to make the ££££ to upgrade from my Ka. It felt like a rocketship in comparison. I was obsessed with it and could probably still list all the differences between a "phase 1" and "phase 2" car.
    7 points
  16. After a few days off being distracted collecting and fixing* this it was back into the shed today. First surprise was a flat tyre on the back of the c900. It would appear that the new bead sealer I had used had failed to seal one of the wheels. Took it off, removed the tyre and cleaned up the rim again. Applied my old faithful black goop bead sealer, refitted the tyre and refitted the wheel to the car. By the time I came in, pressure had not dropped so think it has worked this time. Hope so as I have a road trip in it starting early Monday morning! Whilst I had the extension leads out, I thought I would continue on the tyre theme and fit the new ones onto the Sonett. The previous owner had used the car for competitions, mainly sprints, so had fitted wider low profile tyres. The 195-55s fitted helped grip (in the dry) but occasionally rubbed on the inside arches. As it is now a road car, I decided to go back to 165-60s as originally fitted. The combination of low profile stiff sidewalls and tyres fractionally too wide for the rims meant they were a bugger to get off. The first two took about half an hour each, but the third took well over an hour! Light was fading so thought about leaving the 4th one until tomorrow, but knew I would lack enthusiasm and it could end up sitting around for weeks! Decided to just go for it and to my surprise it came off easily and was done within 10 minutes! Wheels back on With that done I started the cleaning and polishing ready to put it on the market, and started on the offside rear wing. Soon decided I was lacking enthusiasm so switched off the lights and locked up for the evening.
    7 points
  17. loserone

    The new news 24 thread

    AN SPOT or two from the weekend
    6 points
  18. Cat and I went for a little photoshoot yesterday. I was probably more excited to test drive his car than I should have been. Compared to my auto 2.5 diesel non-turbo, it is far snappier taking off at low speeds, and accelerates better for overtaking on the highway. As Cat says, it is surprisingly gutsy for a 2 litre of that period, and I was easily able to get it up to [REDACTED] mph. I was also surprised that there is no noise difference at cruising speeds between petrol or diesel 190s. This car is a true fighter. Now I just have to persuade Cat not to sell it next month so he can buy another Peugeot or something 🙄.
    6 points
  19. cort16

    eBay tat volume 3.

    v6 https://www.gumtree.com/p/peugeot/1997-peugeot-605-3.0-sve/1419075312
    6 points
  20. In all fairness, there are plenty of building firms in 2021 who still use a transit/7.5 ton tipper, a barrow and a scaffold plank for all their spoil removal solutions. The main advance these days is the high lift mini dumper/or tracked barrow, which does allow you to tip straight into a vehicle bed or skip without leaving the ground. I did some groundworks in 2019 using my mini digger, a wheel barrow, a skip and long scaffolding plank (with me providing my own labour). The feeling of terror when you suddenly run out of momentum four foot off the ground on a 9 inch wide plank with a loaded barrow in front of you is distinctly disquieting.
    6 points
  21. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/384484873645?hash=item59851595ad:g:~gEAAOSwR5ZhhVUp
    6 points
  22. With all their friends
    6 points
  23. Spurious

    The new news 24 thread

    Spotted on faceache
    5 points
  24. Sailing makes me happy. I've not had a holiday in two years and I'm really enjoying this one. 😁
    5 points
  25. Finished off the welding on the 505 but didn't take many photos. Just needs a liberal coating of paint, seam sealer and underseal to finish it off. I did grind down the welds flat but didn't get any pics. Mot is on Thursday so just trying to fix any obvious issues. I also changed the other belts at the weekend as when my alternator belt snapped I only had two out of the four belts I needed to replace so had to refit the old ones until the others arrived. I've had them for a couple of weeks now but had been putting off fitting them and really only made an effort at the weekend because one of them had started to squeak. It was particularly annoying because one of the belts I needed to replace was behind all of the others so had to remove them all to fit it. There isn't a lot of room in there, maybe if the radiator was removed it would help but it seemed like more effort than it was worth. With the Camry sorted and potentially having the 205 fixed and a fresh mot on the 505 I'm back to having "too many" working cars. Not sure whether to tart up the focus by welding the crusty bits and flog it or just run it into the ground over winter.
    5 points
  26. A break from the box to have a look at some more Johnny Lightning models. 1959 Cadillac Miller-Meteor ambulance. Same as the previously shown Ghostbuster castings, but this time in a coroner's car livery. 1971 Pontiac GTO. 1966 Cadillac Hearse. In other miniature shite news, I'm working toward building a diorama or two (or several thousand until they consume my house). Below is just a test bed. I've been trying different techniques, materials etc., to get the hang of it. Back to the Johnny Lightning stuff. They look too small when compared with other 1:64. Here's a Greenlight Crown Vic for comparison. They're about the same size, yet a caddy hearse should be noticeably bigger. Think I'm going to be very selective about buying any more Johnny Lightning stuff as they don't look right when displayed alongside other manufacturers.
    5 points
  27. I’ve re-read the Burton instructions for finding TDC and I think I’ve got it correct. It doesn’t mention locking the flywheel via a hole in the crank case like the 2CV so maybe the Visa doesn’t have that hole. I’m still waiting for a black 2CV style coil to arrive, I’ve got a pair of brown Visa coils which were pretty hard to get hold of and I’ll be sticking on eBay. As soon as the 2cv coil turns up I’ll have a go at firing the thing up. Once the engine is running the timing can be altered by turning the 123 unit, in a similar way to a conventional distributor. Fine tuning needs to be done with a strobe gun, I’ll have to actually create timing marks using tippex or similar. Talking of the 123 unit, the green light is meant to illuminate as one of the magnets passes under the sensor, however this appears to be reversed with the green light only going off when the magnets pass by.
    5 points
  28. And if you're going to make a mini Cambuster, you have to make a mini Bazooka too right? That is the orange glass out of the overpainted Pi-Eyed Piper from yesterday
    5 points
  29. Am I forgiven?
    5 points
  30. Talbot

    The grumpy thread

    Private fireworks need to be banned and bloody soon too. Have found plenty of debris from fireworks in the garden, and the constant fucking noise at stupid hours of the day and night, way way WAAAY too close to other houses is beyond anti-social. I still don't get why someone would spunk £60 for a "private" fireworks party in their back garden, when they could spend £10 and go to a properly organised event, with some actual healthandsafety, where you can actually see the fireworks, and there's about 20 times as much to see. Plus, you won't be scaring the fuck out of all the local pets. Next firework that goes off is getting rammed up the person-who-lit-it's arse.
    5 points
  31. ...in the 1920's - Edwin developed the Pagefield System designed in conjunction with Pagefield a long forgotten lorry maker. But Edwin's were wooden boxes that were hoisted onto the lorry with chains, although functionimg like a modern day skip, did not look like them. Shelvoke and Drewry updated the system and used the 'Freighter' to transport the boxes. The Freighter was designed to be as simple as possible so that drivers of horse drawn rubbish wagons could move over to them easily, but they were more often seen as dustbin lorries. The system we know and love was started by George Dempster from Knoxville, Tennessee in 1935, the 'Dempster Dumpster'. But it was in 1940 that Ernest and Wallace Brooks developed Dempsters system to the ultimate form used today, the 'Load Lugger' - The Dempster/Brooks system didn't really start to catch on in the UK until the '60's. https://www.expertskiphire.co.uk/who-invented-skip-origin-and-name
    5 points
  32. The vast bulk of the lifetime "carbon footprint" of a car comes in terms of fuel both EV and ICE. You can see this from research. Yes, EVs have a higher initial carbon footprint, about twice, but once you start exceeding 100,000 miles, the EV (based on Natural Gas grid generation) starts to pull ahead of ICE cars. When you start using renewables and nuclear for electricity production, the EV pulls ahead very early. The EOL disposal is fractional compared to the actual fuel costs/generation over 100k miles. What's in favor the EV is that A. Natural Gas is about as clean as it gets for fossil fuels. Majority of UK generation is Gas. B. It brings the polution out of urban areas. I don't think it's as simple as thinking that the BMW 528 is greener than a Leaf becuse it's 20 years old and already "exists". It's a wee bit more complex than that but it's not hard to see how EVs can pull ahead if the power grid get's greener. Big EU commission report of the matter https://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2018/617457/IPOL_STU(2018)617457_EN.pdf I'm sure there's more uptodate material and references but it's not a bad place to start. I'd rather be honest with myself and say I can't have an EV becuse I can't just afford it right now rather than trying to ignore the "green" benefits. Or I rather Petrol engines. Or the range doesnt suit. Etc etc.
    5 points
  33. I asked if LP had the address of where the car was registered to in France. He did, but it was tricky to read. I found it anyway. Looks like it's been kept in a barn out of the sunshine as all the satellite photos show it absent at the address However, it is caught on the track to the Lieu Dit on streetview from 2011
    5 points
  34. That is absolutely glorious. I wonder how many gallons to the mile it does. It would make a lovely place to "work from home" plenty of room inside for a desk and chair, just go and park somewhere with a nice view.
    4 points
  35. Alas the only picture I have of the situation is this one. It was near junction 2. I also broke down on the A14 a few months later about 30 miles from the spot I did the headgasket. It was crud jamming the float bowl that time. I have RAC but really it's only for recovering Montegos from the Highlands...
    4 points
  36. Efsi seem to have spent most of their time pumping out vintage cars, but occasionally turned their hand to other things, like this Fiat 242. I'm sure the ill fitting sliding door was faithful copied from the original another unusual choice to recreate comes from Majorette in the shape of a Toyota Tercel
    4 points
  37. I've done a few at the side of a residential road before now, but on the side of a motorway???
    4 points
  38. Talbot

    The grumpy thread

    £300 Discovery + large tubular nudge-bar
    4 points
  39. I quite like fireworks, but I'd be quite happy if the sale of them required a massively expensive licence to prevent every fucking corner shop selling them to neds for weeks before and after the 5th.
    4 points
  40. Fuel filler apparatus now reinstated. Threading the pipes through the plastic conduit arrangement was a bit of a faff. It's all gotten a bit busier under there. Fuel lines all buttoned up now, To the rear, (still need to clip the tank to pump line to the chassis leg) Up front. Once I've checked everything over under here, I can get the motor back in.
    4 points
  41. I'm sure @cort16, had a 100HP. I'm sure he'll tell you all about it.
    3 points
  42. Who invented the skip and skip lorry? One of those unheralded inventions that improved the way things are done immeasurably.
    3 points
  43. Isopon

    eBay tat volume 3.

    Chavalier Sportshatch, £4250 https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/294529292200?hash=item44935057a8:g:LRMAAOSw0E5hh9Rq
    3 points
  44. The irony of a Petrol car meet being organised at a Tesla dealership was not lost on me… but it was and it was well attended. Highlights… Some non brits too…. plus ferraris, pop and bang BMWs and Tesla’s aplenty And in the forecourt next door… I did pop in to enquire if it was some kind of trade in they wanted rid of… but it was the managers personal car!
    3 points
  45. mat_the_cat

    Another BX

    This year has been incredibly busy until late summer, so I had no chance to work on this for a while. I must admit I've been putting it off since then as the area under the washer bottle is quite a tricky area to repair properly due to multiple seams all meeting at the same point. However today I couldn't put it off any longer, so got stuck into it. As it turned out the bulk of the repair was to the inner wing, and the bulkhead/scuttle area only needed a tiny patch. On the previous post you can see the strut mount reinforcement plate, which I ground back and welded to what was left of the inner wing. I then cut a plate to repair the inner wing, and drilled it to plug weld to the reinforcement plate. Welded that in together with a smaller patch at the front, then cut a strip for the wheel arch liner to locate on. I've just given it the first coat of Zinga, which I do to give galvanic protection to all the welds before applying sealer. It was actually only around 10 hours work, so less than I'd feared! The A pillar is worse on this side, but at least it feels like I've broken the back of it now. Hopefully the next update will be before another 9 months is up...
    3 points
×
×
  • Create New...