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  1. For aslong as I can remember I've wanted to be directing my own path in business but never had the actual confidence to overcome huge self doubt and fears of failure, in 2021 when I nearly met with my mortality thanks to covid I remember hating that I'd played things safe as houses like a boring nobody and literally despite continued health maladies I feel that I've got a second run up at life , so I'm starting from nothing at 35 and want to get pushing forward with what is abit of a dream for me . So basically my sister and I have teamed up to create a new garage/engineering works of which provides the usual bread and butter garage services and also more specialised work less commonly found like large manual machining capability and welding. We're looking to stock up on a range of common classic parts too so that we can take on most project work without waiting on parts turning up in ebay etc albeit limited space prevents stocking a vast amount. So far over the last 8 months ! Obligatory huge lathe brought back somewhat inappropriately Company car brought down , inappropriately Lathe electrical rebuild done because it was dangerous as hell, 415 through the soaked push buttons etc ,,horrible ! Once cleaned and generally setup it's been put to work straight away! this s100 k series swap was quite aquite to drive, getting one to fit the earlier car isn't bolt in like with the estelle and rapid ! Cambelt snappage job on an iveco 2.3, lots of new valves and lapping required! loads of work done, and loads more hopefully to come !
    59 points
  2. The weather was looking ok, it was time to take the Sierra out for a test drive. Even with the battery disconnected, the fuel gauge was showing that the tank was nearly full. Bearing in mind that I only put about 5 litres in when I first bought the Sierra, the gauge reading looked very wrong. With the battery reconnected, the Pinto fired up first time and the exhaust spat out a mouthful of moisture. More on this later. Whilst walking out of the workshop, to move the E46 out of the way, I noticed that the brake lights were permanently on. I quickly got changed, removed the bottom of the dashboard again to gain access to the brake pedal switch. I removed the switch to check and clean it. It looked ok. I refitted the switch and adjusted it to the correct position. Evidently, I must have disturbed the switch whilst fiddling with the pedal box yesterday. All pre-flight checks done, it was time to set off. I got as far as my local Esso fuel station. I managed to squeeze 5 litres of petrol into the tank before the filler neck was full. It looks like the gauge was showing an almost full tank because the tank was almost full. On the basis that the tank holds 60 litres and I've added about 10 litres since buying the Sierra, there must have been about 50 litres of fuel in the tank. At approx £1.50 per litre, that's a £75 gift. Thank you previous owner. Before leaving the fuel station, I was approached by three people, who commented on how immaculate the Sierra is and who asked how old it is and how many miles it has done. How nice that the posh folk of Beaconsfield appreciate old Fords. Approx 5 miles into my trip, I stopped off at a garden centre to check vital fluids and to give everything a once over. No problems to report. The pretty setting provided an opportunity for a couple of photos. Back on the road, I headed for the A404. If you've ever watched Wheeler Dealers (the GB episodes), you will have seen Mike B towing or driving something along this famous* dual carriageway. Without any struggling, the Sierra got up to 60MPH. I came off the A404 at the A4 junction and drove through Maidenhead, Cookham, Wooburn Green and towards home. I stopped off at Glory Park for a couple more photos. I arrived back home almost exactly 20 miles later, as confirmed by the trip meter. This is good news, it means the trip meter and odometer are both reading just fine. Ok, I've only driven the Sierra for 20 miles along local traffic free roads but my first thoughts are very positive. Engine - I adjusted the idle speed at the garden centre, once the engine reached full operating temperature. Throughout the trip, the engine ran fine, quickly reached operating temperature and the needle didn't budge from the mid point. It pulled well from low revs, with no missing or spluttering. Nothing has leaked out, however there is still a whiff of paraffin / old engine oil / mucky residue from where I've been tinkering, which will need time to burn off. Gearbox - All gears go in and out just fine, synchros are strong. The gearbox is silent and I love the mechanical feel of the gear change. Clutch - Biting point spot on. No dragging, no slipping, no juddering. Perfect. Prop & Diff - Silent, no vibrations. Steering - Noticeably heavy at parking speeds, otherwise works well and feels adequately light at speed. Steering wheel is on straight, no pulling, no issues. Suspension - Smooth! No knocks, no bangs. Ride comfort is superb, on par with my W123. Handling is roly-poly, as expected. Brakes - Needed a bit of time to bed in, however once the pedal firmed up, they worked just fine. I tried a couple of emergency stops, no pulling, no issues. Exhaust - Drill holes failed to allow any moisture to escape overnight and I could hear a significant blow from both silencers. Bollocks. Evidently, drilling holes in silencers is not a good idea. I will plug both holes with chemical metal and self-tapping screws this afternoon. Radio - Played Greatest Hits Radio (105.8FM), including Popmaster at 10:30am. All six speakers work ok and the FM reception is better than expected, bearing in mind I live and drove the Sierra through The Chilterns. Summary - I love it! @N19 I am sure that I will find something to write about soon. There are a few more bodywork related issues that I want to attend to and I expect the forthcoming MoT test will reveal something wrong with the old Ford.
    57 points
  3. I've been looking forward to this day for the past two months. Once the Sierra was back on its wheels, I undersealed the jacking points that were concealed by axle stands / ramps. The other side is the same. It was time to pull the Sierra out of the workshop. As the underseal was still fresh and the car isn't taxed, I only drove the Sierra to the end of the road and back to outside my house to take photos. At this stage, I recommend that you rewind to page 4 of this thread and remind yourself what the Sierra looked like on the 30th January, the day it arrived from Northern Ireland. I am pleased with the results and I'll let the photos do the talking. Please note that I haven't washed or detailed the bodywork and trim yet, hopefully I will get a chance to do that next weekend. The bonnet, roof and boot lid look much better in sunlight than they do under a LED lamp. Yes, if you look closely and at the right angle, you can see the fine scratches but overall, the paint looks great. Remember how the four corners looked? The tarpaulin that the Sierra was stored under rubbed the blue paint off down to primer / bare / rusty metal. My masking off and dabbing of blue paint has worked well. Up close, you can see the touching up but I am pleased with my low cost solution. The sills and inner sides of the rear wheel arches look much better too. The boot lid and rear valance now gleam. I left the engine to idle for about 15 minutes and it ran well, nice and quiet, with no smoke. The temperature gauge reached half way quickly (and stayed there) but the coolant level was still low. The idle speed is a little too fast, I need to work out which screw needs a tweak. With the Sierra outside, it took me two hours to clean the workshop. EVERY surface was covered with a layer of black overspray dust, which spread when I was painting the bumpers. Got there in the end. I put the Sierra back in for another week, until it can be taxed and driven from the 1st April. The 1st April is a Monday. According to the forecast, the weather should be dry. Let's hope so.
    56 points
  4. TL;DR the site will go for some major maintenance this coming Friday afternoon/evening. I’ll figure exact times closer to the point. Expect a few hours downtime when this is all going on. The current server setup has been online for nearly half a decade and in computing world, that’s an actual lifetime. It has had a good innings but it’s coming to end of life. Not only is the server operating system getting close to not being no longer receiving security updates (end of June 2024 is the cut off) but the underlying server hardware is pretty old technology now. I suspect the hosting provider has chocked that server full of other clients and hammering it hard too. Both reasons are very likely why things seem to go really slow at times and you may on occasions get that very frustrating 502 Bad Gateway errors when trying to access parts of the site. This occurs when the site takes too long to generate a page and times out (around 30 seconds). Ultimately, we need to migrate to a new server and do it soon. Hopefully it will eliminate those errors. Of course I can’t guarantee for certain those errors will completely go away but I fully expect them to. Likewise, its important we move to continue getting the latest security updates to keep the site stable and secure. To use an analogy, previous recent updates have been the oil and tyre changes on the bus. This is basically a whole new bus where the branding/customisations need to be reapplied. A few months ago in the background, I have built up and started testing a new server enviroment. Some may have seen the previous announcement a few months ago about the testing site at https://autoshitetesting.co.uk - thanks everyone who checked out and gave it a poke. The server that this site is on will become the new server the forum will live on (will still stay as autoshite.com when fully live). This is the latest version of our Server Operating System (Debian) and should give us security support till the end of June 2028. The hardware is the latest technology in CPU, memory and disks. These all should offer multiple times the performance of the existing server setup. I’ve jigged things around so hopefully it will keep it to around the same monthly hosting cost despite the increase in performance. It’ll take a good few hours to copy all the data from the old to the new and then make the switch. I don’t expect any major hiccups but there maybe a few kinks that may need ironing out once live too. I’m hoping that most machines should pickup the new server IP address automagically and we won’t lose anyone along the way. I’ll try putting up a site somewhere else that we can still provide support if things go wrong (probably https://autoshitetest.co.uk). So note that down now. I’ve been wanting to do this for a while and have had everything roughly in-place, but I’ve needed to find time to finish this off and go live. Life has been busy for me recently and I’ve needed to find a good slot. Not just a few hours but possibly a day or two if things go really awry. I certainly don't expect any issues (otherwise I wouldn't be kicking this off!) but I need to budget contingency as its a major switch with a few unknowns. The aim is for possibly Friday afternoon/evening to kick this off. I can’t say exact times yet but hopefully can say closer to the time. I like being on here as much as many of you do and this work is needed to keep this forum all hunky-dory. I'll leave this thread unlocked for now if anyone has any questions or concerns on this.
    52 points
  5. Welcome back! If you can read this then the migration is done and you're on the new server. The search is currently rebuilding, so you may find that doesn't work quite right. Usually that takes a day to complete. Please let me know if anything isn't working properly or anything appears missing (especially email notifications for hotmail/icloud users). A fresh backup is currently running which will drive the server quite hard. That'll take a few hours. Hopefully by tomorrow everything will have settled down and be up to full performance. For the most part, everything should be pretty much identical. It'll be a success if it is. Thank you for your patience!
    52 points
  6. I've copied and pasted these initial updates from another forum. This goes back to 2021/early 2022. First two posts will cover the back story and then I'll add what I've been doing to it this last month. There's been quite a delay on this because my wife became very ill in mid-2022 and all life turned to making sure she came through her illness (which she has, all-clear been given etc etc). Life is sort of back to normal (although i'd argue that something like that changes life and perspectives across the entire family. Not sure what normal is now tbh). So back to 2021..............I've wanted to have a build thread of my own for years but I've never had a car that I felt had sufficient interest (or age) to warrant a thread. But Covid changed my attitude - felt that life can be so precarious that I really had to step up my search for something. I live in West Wales and alot of my local friends are electricians or carpenters or plumbers. They go to a lot of houses and farms. I told them all to look out for anything under a cover or tarpaulin or looked a bit forgotten that to give me a ring. In 2022 I got a call about this car from one of the lads. He didn't know what he was looking at, just that he knew it needed saving and 'it looks quick'! I met the owner (whom used to use it quite often but then his life took a turn for the worse and it had to be set aside to prioritise other things going on - totally understandable) before xmas 2021 and agreed a deal and paid a 10% deposit....then xmas and life got in the way and it was only today that I was able to go and pick it up. The plan is to ignore the exterior for the moment.....and just get the interior dry and all fitted out (I've got all the parts but he did the headlining and then life got in the way and some of the interior needs putting back). I've got a couple of dehumidifiers coming to help with the drying out too. I then am going to get the car mechanically fettled and then MOT'd. Once it's MOT'd then I'm going to use it for business meetings, day trips with the kids, charity runs, going up to North Wales to see my Dad and Devon to see my mum etc etc.. Some initial pictures - bear in mind it was under a tarp(for 3 years, with the passenger window open..........) right up until the point you see these pictures. We got it into my shed and onto the ramp to see what we had. The interior needs a lot of fettling. On to the next instalment.
    51 points
  7. RIP, it's gone to heaven with Diana and all the angles. Let it be her Maj's and Sir Captain Tom's passion wagon now.
    51 points
  8. I left the paint to dry overnight and this morning. I removed the masking tape and broadsheet to reveal sweet looking bumpers. The front grille looks sweet too. Next issue, sort out the sun burned bumper trims. I have a plan and Amazon have delivered the solution but unfortunately I ran out of time this afternoon to make further progress. Definitely more soon.
    49 points
  9. Congrats to @grogee for guessing correctly. Meet my latest financial burden. 1988 Mitsubishi Colt GLX 1500.
    46 points
  10. Collection complete. Arrived at Exeter 12 mins late, not bad for the UK🙄 Compulsory wollard below. Looking forward to the drive home. An absolute pleasure to meet petrolblog, a thoroughly nice man .
    45 points
  11. Rightio, the nagging has paid off and I've got it booked. Location is my mates field/woods/campsite near Bridgnorth in Shropshire. Should be quite reasonably priced so long as we tidy up afterwards. https://www.powkesmoreholding.co.uk/ Edit #1 Lets make the location easy to find. What3 words to the entrance. ///bungalows.next.windmills Which looks like this The open one on the left. From above. Access is from Ashfield Road, the track marked on Google heading South East doesn't exist as far as I know. Further out.
    43 points
  12. *incoherent excited yelling and pointing* *image stabilisation has no power over my excitement* TWELVE YEARS I've been waiting for this to happen! An Ambassador encountered totally randomly in the wild. Mike, the owner of the Ambassador, was so surprised to see the Princess as he was leaving and I was arriving that he turned around and came back specifically to say hello. I am inordinately excited and I refuse to contain myself.
    43 points
  13. Some quick pics of the Shad as promised, Mr WC already wants to take it out in Convoy with the Guy Arab when that’s back on the road so expect some Rolls and Bus action soon, I also took it to work this morning and managed to attract a crowd almost instantly mainly from my colleagues who were probably wondering if the CEO of First Bus had just showed up for a random Audit 😆 I’d like to give it a really good wash and detail very soon as it got absolutely filthy from the drive home yesterday
    43 points
  14. I gave up on threads a while ago but I have wanted one of these cars since they were brand new, plus I think things might get interesting*. So here goes. So far I count myself as the EIGHTH AS member who has owned this, including the chap who posted it for sale in behalf of the then owner. I think that's pretty great. I hope when I die I return as a car that goes around the country bringing joy to a whole range of different owners. So far we've had Jon.k Northernmonkey Robson3022 Paulplom Kiltox 83C Schaefft Yours truly. The first didn't technically own it, he simply posted it for sale on behalf of the owner who had originally wanted to scrap it because of a pulley on the engine which had come adrift. So kudos to John.k for saving what certainly feels like a car which had plenty of life left. In short (because it is documented elsewhere) it was owned by Westley Richards gunsmiths manufacturer in the West Midlands. It was a personal car to the directly and then used to chauffeur some very wealthy (like Arab Royalty wealthy) to and from the premises. After Jon.k's arm was bitten off by NorthernMonkey, it passed through varioous members' hands and gave generally good service along the way. I promised myself I'd own it one day.
    40 points
  15. Picked this up today to give my Sierra a rest. 2.0 diesel auto-Connoisseur SE. 155,000 miles-done very little over the last few years. Bloke I bought it off had it for 18 years. 6 weeks MOT left. Drives well- a few niggles to sort out-exhaust vibrating, headlining drooping , needs a good clean and takes a while to start when hot. Still it only cost £400
    39 points
  16. 39 points
  17. Homeward journey in the Amazon went well. It absolutely tanned the M6 north. Without the pressure to get to a destination intact, we both opened it right up and enjoyed it. @Ronkey wanted inspiration to get his finished. Get stuck in, because it'll be worth it! A couple of stops for coffee, but mainly to tip jerry cans into the frustratingly small fuel tank. That fuel tank seemed increasingly small on the way back as with the car being pushed hard, let's just say the earlier 34mpg was a distant fantasy. But who cares! Stopped off at @warninglights place for a cup of tea, and to poke round his collection of really interesting Volvo projects. The Laplander is something to behold and is already looking like a completely different beast to when he got it. I won't give away anything, but this is going to be brilliant. Lolvo meets Volvo. And home. I enjoyed every minute of driving this. It was comfortable, surprisingly rapid, and with very few modern touches, totally capable. With the longer diff installed the speedo no longer over-reads like most cars, and a 70 on the needle is a true GPS 70. As such it felt like we were flying past the traffic. It was keen for more, and without trying you'd notice you'd drifted up to GPS 80 and it had plenty left without being remotely loud. And that's before you flick the overdrive off, where you get a surprising burst of power available. The K cam and overdrive puts this right in the sweet spot for motorway driving as it's at the foot of the powerband. Having that at the flick of a stalk means you can really piss off middle lane drivers who don't want to move, but don't like being overtaken by a 60 year old shack. Tough! I am surprised Volvo never offered the M41+OD+1.41 axle combo in production cars, because it's just so right. It does rob a fair bit of your 0-60 and standing starts aren't as lively, but the K cam more than makes up for that, you just hold the gears a little longer. Rustival was fun and I would do it again. The very best part of it was seeing people, @Talbot, @chaseracer, @mat_the_cat, @Puglet @Sunny Jim, @Six-cylinder, @Mrs6C, @Andyrew. Thank you all for such a brilliant weekend. What a great bunch of lads. Enjoyed the autojumbles, perhaps a little too much as we came home with a set of four Lucas driving lights. The enjoyment of the trip spurred me into getting some more things sorted on the car, so I have now spaffed the best part of a grand on a branched manifold, sports exhaust, a better intake, and a full set of polybushes, plus a load of electrical parts to try and fix niggles and improve the (still bodged) lighting. To round things off, when I got home I had a nice surprise waiting in the form of a Professional Prat.
    39 points
  18. Today is actually spring and warm, so can now open up the garage for the first time since October. The first job was to add a diesel additive and then change the fuel tank cap as the old one was leaking. Old one don't look so good. The only new one I found was this which a Mercedes specialist said would fit and it did. Then it was time to start it for the first time since October and it started quickly this year, faster than last year but as always was a bit grumpy in the first few minutes. My current phone doesn't film as well as the last one so this isn't the best but it's something. Now got the charging tested after I made a completely new charging system this winter and the result is 14.56 at idle without headlights and 13.10 at idle with headlights, so can call this a success. The next thing is to look at the cooling system and change the coolant and maintenance and it is ready for the road again. Hope it happens within 2 weeks waiting for the roads to be clean and safe from salt.
    37 points
  19. Test drive completed. No wobble whatsoever, the Sierra was only giving me good vibrations. Looking good with a squirt of tyre shine.
    36 points
  20. Eight years ago today this turd landed at mine. Tomorrow I will apply for historic tax and, judging by the complete lack of progress on the Mini, proceed to use it over the next few months. Both the other cars in this photo since sold and scrapped, the house SSTC and and my lovely friend Emma has moved onto a better place. Then again she lived in Hemel, so a move to Strangeways would have been a positive move. Happy bASe day, fellow motorist.
    35 points
  21. @EspenO was right on the money. I borrowed my wife's floor steam cleaner, which has a small brush adaptor that is just right for cleaning Sierra wheel arch liners. Great tool. No noise, no mess, just steam that goes straight onto the desired surface. I could see brown water dripping down the liners, the steam managed to remove 95% of dirt. The liners were clean but not shiny enough for me, so I gave them a wipe over with a tiny bit of this stuff. The results speak for themselves. I can relax now, knowing that when I drive the Sierra down the road, the wheel arch liners that are hidden behind the wheels, which no one will see, are now nice and clean. The rear bumper is fucked. The greyish blueish paint coatings are peeling, it has numerous scratches and two vertical cracks in-line with the number plate lights. Some of the scratches are very deep. I rubbed the heavily scratched areas with 120 grade paper, in a circular motion, which got rid off the worst imperfections. I prepared and cleaned the bumper and masked it off. And gave it a coat of primer. The front bumper is in better condition but it is far from perfect. The bumpers are not black and I have acquired an aerosol can of gloss black. On the basis that I have to fix the rear bumper, consequently I also have to do the front one. I cleaned the front bumper and masked it off. The top section of the bumper is black and mostly ok so it will not be re-sprayed. And gave it a coat of primer. I will leave the primer to dry overnight and spray the bumpers black in the morning. The chrome* strips in the bumpers are weathered, especially the front one. I have a cunning plan how to sort them out. I had a two minute break for a cuppa and chocolate croissant. The front grille was chipped and cracked. I filled the chip and crack with chemical metal. Rubbed it down. And gave it a squirt of primer. I will spray it black in the morning. A few minor cosmetic jobs aside, the Sierra is ready to hit the road. However, I still have tomorrow and another four man days (two weekends) to do a few more jobs before the maiden voyage scheduled for the 1st April. I want to clean and spray the front suspension components, clean and re-paint the engine sump and spend a bit more time touching up the brush painted areas. More tomorrow.
    35 points
  22. hammy

    Daewoo Esperos

    I've long admired the original Daewoo range launched here in 1995. I even managed to convince my dad to test drive an Espero from the 'motorshow' in Bristol in 1996. Today I took delivery of three of the few surviving Esperos left in the UK. The silver N reg is a lovely original car with loads of history. Not mint but hopefully easy to bring it up to scratch, the P reg will be a parts donor as it has structural damage that won't repair. The green N reg is well known on the 'socials, bring a ULEZ survivor rescued by Jude Currie. It's tatty in places but too good to break up. Realistically it'll only be staying with me briefly as I have other projects that need my time and money.
    34 points
  23. I’m not Destination achieved, nice cup of tea with @jonathan_dyane and then headed south. Stopped at my old university friends place in St Helens to top up with LPG and now waiting for another shiter to finish work so I can make my second collection after which I can start heading north. Only as far as Preston tonight Picture near the next shifters place
    34 points
  24. I started today by fitting the new clutch cable. It fitted perfectly, however it made no difference to the clutch pedal height or the biting point. I opted to change the upper position of the clutch pedal by fitting a metal plate to the existing, non-adjustable, stop. I carefully bent the stop a little so that the extended plate that will be fixed to its side will line up with the white part of the adjustment mechanism. I then drilled two small holes, the bottom one not too close to the edge of the metal. I secured the metal plate with two nuts and bolts. The nuts and bolts do not interfere with any part of the clutch mechanism. Here comes the science bit. If I made the extended plate too short, the pedal height would not be lowered by the desired amount. If I made the extended plate too long, the pedal would be located too low, the adjustment mechanism may not have enough range to take up the clutch cable slack and, as lowering the height of the clutch pedal reduces the pedal travel, there could be the possibility that the clutch would not disengage fully with the pedal depressed, causing clutch drag. The new plate extends from the stop by approx 12mm. I did no measuring, it was just a guesstimate. If the extended plate was to be too long, I could remove and shorten it. If it was too short, I had more spare metal brackets to make up a new one. With the pedal box in a vice, I could already see that the clutch pedal stopped below the stop height of the brake pedal. Looking good. I refitted the pedal box and hooked up the clutch cable. Still looking good, the clutch pedal was situated a good three inches lower than before. I slowly depressed the clutch pedal a few times, the quadrant clicked itself into place and it ended up here. There is no slack in the cable and the quadrant still has a fair bit more range (I pressed on the upper part of the quadrant to find out). The latter is important as it means that the quadrant mechanism has not been forced to its maximum working position and there is room for further adjustment, if required. I fired up the Pinto and checked the position of the clutch biting point. Perfect. The clutch bites nicely at just below half pedal travel and all gears engage smoothly with no crunching, which means the clutch is fully disengaged with the clutch pedal down. Win! @sierraman was right, that the clutch biting point was normal, after all there was no method of adjusting the height of the clutch pedal and the quadrant was found to be working ok. I guess I improved on Ford's design. To celebrate, I refitted the bottom of the dashboard etc and cleaned the mud stained pedals. Next issue. Even with the Sierra parked in a dry garage, whenever I switched the engine on, condensation would blow out of the exhaust pipe. When I posted on here a few months back regarding how to prevent mild steel exhaust systems from rotting out, I recall being advised that I should drill small holes in the lowest point of each silencer, which would allow moisture to escape (drip out) from the silencer. I did just that, drilled a small hole in the bottom of each silencer. The original wheel brace is missing and I wanted to pack a few essentials for my maiden voyage, just in case something went wrong. I prepared this selection, which includes 5 litres of water, engine oil, brake fluid, tyre pump, 19mm socket on extension bar, basic tool kit, gaffer tape and gloves. Apart from the large water bottle, all the bits fitted snuggly in my handy and very fashionable Borg & Beck plastic bag. So, I've done all I had on my to-do list (and more!) and the Sierra is ready for its maiden voyage. Whether I go anywhere tomorrow, the 1st April, depends entirely on the weather. At the moment it is looking a bit 50/50 according to my iPhone app and guaranteed rain all day if the BBC weather app is to be believed, followed by more rain each day next week. Great. I am very apprehensive about the first drive in the Sierra. The very first short drive from the main road to my house was too stressful, with the Sierra looking like a shed and barely making it home with the exhaust blowing out of both silencers, my mind was focused on a refund rather than on having fun. Ditto last weekend's drive to the end of my road and back, wasn't enough to get to know how the Sierra behaves. Fact is, whenever I will get to drive it, I will end up feeling disappointed. Chances are, it is suffering from a fault that I am yet to discover, such as pulling brakes, vibrations via the drivetrain, clonks, rattles, etc. Even if it doesn't suffer any major issues, I doubt the carb fed Pinto will provide the levels of performance that I am accustomed to, bearing in mind I drive a brand new Nissan Qashqai daily and one of my toys is a perky E46. The unassisted steering will be too heavy, even compared with my W123, which has power steering but which is nowhere near as light as what I am used to. I suspect the Sierra will feel heavy to drive and difficult to stop, with no ABS.... Ok, ok, I'm not being fair, I can't expect a 37 year old base model Ford to perform like a modern car. Let's hope the nostalgia kicks in and I forget about the rest.
    33 points
  25. Some more stuff tackled. Trying to keep in my head all of the things I thought about fixing while on the Rustival trip. Writing notes? How quaint! Just stay awake at night trying to sift through jumbled thoughts until 3AM. It would probably be good to sort out the broken headlights. Brief recap. A few weeks ago I fitted a latching relay which allowed me to control the full beam entirely through the flasher stalk instead of the antiquated floor switch. This worked brilliantly until it didn't. Turns out that £3 of Chinese "INDUSTRIAL CONTROL" electronics aren't suited for, you know, anything. So the PCB basically melted (it wasn't even carrying notable current). Before the Rustival trip I simply reinstated the floor dip switch to get us on the road. Turns out I wasn't wrong to try and get rid of the floor switch because as soon as it got dark, I went to switch between main and dip on a dual carriageway and lost all headlights. We pulled into a layby, consulted the wiring diagram, and crimped a couple of wires together so that we had headlights (but no mains). Time to fix that permanently. The solution here is to use a 'proper' relay, in this case one designed for an old VW bus / beetle. The relay number is DNI 0127. There are also Meyle and Durite equivalents, so they are easily come by. Step 1, remove floor switch and hurl it into the depths of the garden. Step 2, crimp spades on the end of the wires to the floor switch. Also tee-solder the smaller red wire into the bigger one, as that's more structurally sound than crimping two wires into one spade. Step 3, RELAY Here is the pinout. And here is what that looks like in real life. Step 4 : Replace the fuse you blew because you forgot to disconnect the battery, and touched the permanent +12V against the metal dash. Oh wait, there's no continental fuses left.. So it turns out this lighting setup is even better than the one I set up previously with the INDUSTRIAL CONTROL relay. - When the dipped headlights are off, the flasher stalk operates as a main beam flasher. - When the dipped headlights are on, the flasher stalk toggles the main beam on and off like a modern car. - The relay also serves the purpose of being a relay for both the mains, flasher and dipped. So it takes away the load from the light switch, provides full current to the headlights (brighter!) plus it means I can remove the flasher relay and wiring in the engine bay as it is no longer required. So far this seems a far more robust and efficient setup, time will tell. Engine and gearbox mounts replaced. The gearbox one was particularly hanging and the propshaft was bouncing off the bottom of the transmission tunnel. A set of high performance air filters attached. The purpose being twofold. The generic SU HS6 pancakes I had on would sometimes smack against the clutch master cylinder reservoir on hard cornering or acceleration. I also felt they were strangling the engine as they were so thin and miserable looking. These by comparison are offset specifically to fit the Amazon, and are significantly more chunky. Y THO | Y THO Test drove this and was quite impressed. The wishbone poly bushes have sharpened up the steering a fair bit. The engine and gearbox mounts have changed the gearshifts significantly, and overdrive seems to snick on in a much more dignified fashion. A little bit of the induction roar from the pancakes has actually disappeared, but it still sounds great when opened up. I'll take it. Next up, I'll be fitting the sports exhaust, more polybushes, and doing a number of electrical upgrades to make it more reliable.
    33 points
  26. Last weekend was the VSCC Light Car Section Welsh weekend. this year marked 100 years since the RAC Small Car Trials, which inspired the event, and in which a Palladium did exceedingly well over 1000 miles of hard test driving at the hands of its designer H F Smallwood. Since the aim has always been to take my Palladium on this event it was absolutely essential that it was back up and running in time. Sadly it hasn't been driven for about 4 years, since it suffered some mechanical problems (on the way home from Wales, funnily enough) which resulted in a load of water in Number 4 cylinder and a couple of bent valves. Anyway, we rallied some troops and had a mad week of putting it all back together (absolutely minimal input from myself, obviously) and a few days before the trip it was running for the first time and sounding nice and healthy. I did a quick trip round the block and all seemed well, so all that was left was to keep a positive attitude and pack lots of tools. Here's how things looked after about 100 miles. And approaching the border Noo hood or weather equipment wasn't great considering we were in the grip of Storm Kathleen, but the weather was pretty kind on the way up and I did 200 miles behind the wheel with no problems whatsoever. Made it to Wales and spent two days fannying about, actually much more challenging than the drive up, driving on small roads with lots of hills etc. Here it is in the middle of a section through normally-closed Forestry Commission roads It shed a sidelamp lens going over a nasty bump annoyingly. Here it is resting at the summit of Bwlch-Y-Groes, 'the Welsh Terror', a absolutely nasty very long climb which saw off a few competitors back in 1924, but which the Pall sailed up without any problems (in first gear) And here it is going down the other side After all that, we set off quite early on Sunday. The first leg was quite tough going with awful rain and wind, but the last 100 miles were pretty great going. Got back by 6pm which was alright. The best part of 700 miles covered in four days, which might not sound like much but it takes a huge amount of concentration and energy to drive this thing at speed. Apart from a blocked slow runnning jet there were zero mechanical issues for the whole weekend. The number plate bolts came loose, one of the wing valances sheered the rivets holding it in and was rattling around, I think the gearbox is possibly even nosier than it was before but otherwise it was smooth sailing! So glad to actually get this heap to Wales and re-enact the 1924 event, which was the marque's most notable achievement, particularly on this anniversary year. Next stop: get a hood made.
    32 points
  27. My dream has come true, I’ve driven the Sierra up the A413, heading north west. The only issue that I’ve noticed is an erratic fuel gauge. I know the tank is almost full but the needle keeps dropping to zero, then rises and drops again. First destination reached. A Gulf petrol station in Whitchurch, located between Aylesbury and Buckingham. Before I bought my first Sierra from my then girlfriend’s dad, he let me borrow it for a very extended test drive and I remember putting fuel in the tank at this very station, which, remarkably, still exist today. I’m heading further up the A413 towards Buckingham. 31k miles will tick over shortly. More very soon.
    31 points
  28. Today has been the best day I've had in a long time, I got money back on the taxes, and I've had the highest temperature since October with close to plus 10. And best of all, dad and I have now got something we've been dreaming about and wanting for years a small wheel loader. It is Chinese and electric but this brand has been sold in Norway for a long time and has a good reputation and we have a dealer close by who seems good so it is worth taking the chance on and it has exceeded expectations so far .And it may look like a toy but is bigger than it looks and can lift 500kg. Have tested it on snow removal today and am very happy with it so far.
    31 points
  29. We did a buy today . wcpgw
    30 points
  30. The Chinese can make high quality parts, the problem is that Western consumers won't pay proper money for them.
    30 points
  31. Joey spud

    The new news 24 thread

    I recently bought an old Casio watch off eBay, one that I've always hankered after but when it arrived it didn't have the crisp clean dial of the one on the listing but a rather cloudy one instead. It's like over the years a dusting of the luminous coating has transferred to the back of the crystal. So today after watching a YouTube clip of an American chap sitting on his bed successfully pull a similar watch apart I had a bash at taking the mechanism out of mine and giving it a clean up. A bit of Tesco's finest glass cleaner and a soft cloth and it's come up like new again.
    30 points
  32. Not sure how I drove this to Monaco and back, could hardly sleep with the nerves of driving it to the MOT station today. That said as soon as I hit the road I felt ok, knew the car would be fine and really enjoyed driving it again for first time in about 8 months Thanks to @Rust Collectorfor the tip on running a wire from the tailgate earth to a body earth, it's solved all the dashboard light gremlins Car passed the MOT, I think a couple of the crusty bits around the turrets might need attention before the next MOT but for now they are deemed acceptable
    30 points
  33. Arrived home. What a supremely cosseted waft. Yes the seats are as comfortable as they look! Not packed with horsepower but for a relaxing way to get about it's going to take something special to beat it for a car in every day use.
    30 points
  34. I had a visitor today. Regular readers will remember @DirtyDaily offering to come and rebuild the suspension pump for me. Today it happened. Here we are, all set up at my back gate. Listening for leaks... And the techy stuff begins... New housing that was part of the rebuild kit is at the top, in his left hand. What you can't see here is how the lovely new housing broke as DD was tightening the bolts. We had to re-use the old one. Fortunately it cleaned up well enough. And then he reattached this front undertray that had somehow come adrift. So we went for a test drive. Oh-oh... and that was only the beginning of the error messages. So we came home... ...and DD found that the battery voltage was reading low. Apparently this is something these cars are sensitive to, so ok, we whipped it off and brought it in to put on charge. Once he'd finished laughing at the tiny battery that was fitted! It's little more than half the size of what should be there. And it's on charge now, as you see above. We'll refit it over the weekend and see what difference it makes, if any. DD now totally understands what I mean about this car fighting me at every turn! He is, in many respects, mystified. And this is a man who has the correct tools, the correct JLR diagnostics, and the experience. I am immensely grateful that he took the trouble to come up here for the weekend from Stockport in order to help out a frustrated old bloke. DirtyDaily, thank you so much.
    29 points
  35. PhilA

    2000 Jaguar XJ8

    I bought a new car. It's nice but also broken, because Jaguar. New engine required. Phil
    28 points
  36. Slow drive down. The M25 was horrendous. However, a collection has occurred. I'm in love already!
    28 points
  37. Begone, pea shooter. Had to retap one of the threads on the head as idiot here used a wrong thread pitch manifold stud off another car. CHONK PIPE It won't start now as I've fucked up the idle screws and choke position, and it got dark. So I'll have to wait till later to annoy everyone.
    28 points
  38. "Hi, where are your drills?" "Aisle B, back".
    27 points
  39. My cunning plan to sort out the damaged front bumper trim was to cover it with silver vinyl tape. Back in the day, when I had 10 year old Sierras with chrome trim, I would cover the trim with red vinyl tape, to make them look like newer versions - see photos on page 1. I got a roll of this stuff from Amazon. It says "High Quality". Ten minutes later, the front bumper looked like this. Unfortunately, the quality of the tape is not brilliant and where I pulled to extend it, the tape discoloured slightly. Not to worry, it looks better than the sun burned plastic strip. Once finished, I was left with one sexy looking front bumper. I then spent a couple of hours sorting out a few miscellaneous bodywork jobs. I sprayed over the non-matching oil based paint on the inner side of the nearside sill. I rubbed down a couple of small rust plebs on the back door. Fortunately, these are located beneath the trim strip and the repair won't be too obvious once finished. I'd rather have a small repair patch than leave untreated corrosion under matching paint. I did the same on the offside front door. There were also a couple of rust plebs on the sills, which extended from beneath the door seals. I treated them in the same way. I will touch up all these areas with the matching blue aerosol once the oil based paint, which will subdue the corrosion, fully dries. Whoever re-sprayed the nearside front door, re-used and badly applied the trim strip. The front section of the strip was peeling away. I got this stuff out. It's not the best, despite what the adverts say but hopefully it will do. At this stage, I need to explain that I had a different plan that involved putting pressure on the trim to make it stick but it didn't work out and I had to think fast and came up with this arrangement before the adhesive started to set. Hopefully, the trim will be secure and I won't have 25 litres of 10W40 spilled all over my workshop floor. I won't have much time tomorrow or Friday to make more progress, so the plan is: This Saturday - finish off the bodywork repairs that I started today, tidy up and spray the front suspension components, clean the underside of the gearbox and engine sump and paint the sump. This Sunday - finish off what I started on Saturday, get the car back on its wheels and apply protective coatings to the underside areas that are currently concealed by axle stands / ramps. Then let everything dry. Next Friday (Easter) - fire up the engine again, bleed the cooling system. Weather permitting, pull the Sierra out of the workshop and give it a deep clean and hoover. Take pleasure in taking plenty of lovely photos. Clean my workshop, which is a total mess, just about everything is covered with a layer of black spray residue. Next Sunday (Easter) - if the weather is shit on Friday, undertake the tasks scheduled for Friday, otherwise I shall rest. Next Monday (Easter) - the 1st April, get the Sierra taxed and take it out for a drive and take some more photos.
    27 points
  40. maxxo

    1993 Citroen XM

    well 400 miles covered today furthest I’ve ever driven this car, absolutely no issues at all which is pleasing! All 7 spheres now replaced both centre spheres were full of oil, no gas at all corner spheres were between 0 and 10 PSI accumulator was about dead too suffice to say, 7 brand new spheres have completely transformed the car, it actually has suspension now, stays up for longer and just feels fantastic it has float!
    27 points
  41. Diesel convertibles are just wrong.
    27 points
  42. Me 'usband was a player, 'e was shagging at 83 it wouldn't be a problem, but that was 2 doors up from me so we bought ourselves a Transit, to get away from 'ome an' camped up in a car park, to quell 'is testosterone I asked the bugger nicely to get the washin' out on peg but 2 minutes after this photo, 'e whipped out 'is middle leg ! So in a fit of rage, an' to dampen 'is desire I threw all of 'is bongo mags out onto the old camp fire That shut the randy bastard up alright, an' put a stop to 'is cheap thrill now 'e's sitting by the kettle with a face like a week in Rhyl I'll put some bromide in 'is tea to stop 'is 'ands from roamin' an' shove that Thermos up 'is arse if 'e don't stop 'is moanin' The next day was much better, 'e put 'is trousers on for me but I need to put some jam on 'is shoes, an' invite the bastards down for tea The bucket under the table is filled with sponges and bog roll, of course ' ...coz when 'e goes out for 'is ablutions, 'e pisses like an 'orse Ford Transit camper van conversion - Collection Only | eBay
    27 points
  43. Rewire complete. Have made a few changes. The switched fusebox is fed from a master 100A relay which is triggered from the ignition key. This takes the heavy load off the ignition barrel which could get extremely hot with all of the current for all systems passing through it. The coil is fed straight off the barrel and is unfused, as it should be, so even if the relay fails the engine won't stop. Apart from that I made sure all cable ends had good quality spade connectors and heat shrink wrap with adhesive. This way they're pretty tough and reliable and eliminates some of the nasty and corroded original connectors. The engine bay is much cleaner now without the fusebox, relays, and associated wiring nests. Wiring for the reverse lights and overdrive now run inside, and I've packed the gap around the gearstick with insulation to cut down on road noise. Important upgrade done to the brake lights. The original brake light switch is a fluid pressure switch which tends to only activate when you're standing on the pedal. I've changed it for an electrical pedal switch, which needed a bracket made up. A real pain to drill the bolt holes for this in the pedal box so the top hole is in at an awkward angle. Still it does the trick and is a massive upgrade. The lights now come on as soon as you touch the pedal. While the steering wheel was off I swapped the steering column coupling bush as it was really sloppy. The steering column shroud also got a coat of paint after I did some repairs to the cracking brittle plastic with some epoxy. Last few bits done inside. A new hazard switch. I then remembered I bought a set of instrument panel stickers off Demon Tweeks. So I then did what I originally meant to and sorted the dash light graphics. Before. After.
    26 points
  44. Rover 45. Fantastic.
    26 points
  45. Underside finished bar a coat of sprayable seam sealer. Started stripping engine bay. Primer applied. Still plenty to be done. Now begins the primer, rubbing, and dust phase.
    26 points
  46. Based on @cobblers recommendation, I bought three cans of this stuff, kindly delivered by Amazon this afternoon. He speaks highly of it and it only costs £3 per can more than the Halfords gloss black stuff. My workshop is not ventilated and a Covid mask was the only PPE I had. Leaving the workshop doors open was not an option as the rear bumper would have been exposed to cold temperature and moisture. I started by giving the nearside part of the rear bumper a thin coat of paint. This was the only part of the two bumpers that didn't receive any black paint yesterday. The finish looked promising, there was no evidence of any silicone contamination. I proceeded to rub down the front and rear bumpers with a 220 grade pad. Dirty work. The new paint supposedly has a textured finish. Whilst the front bumper was 90% done and looked ok with a gloss black finish, I didn't want the two bumpers looking different, one with a smooth and the other a textured finish. Shame really, as the front bumper looked pretty good. After rubbing down, I cleaned the surface with a textured dry wipe. I didn't use white spirit. See @cort16 I do pay attention. Front bumper ready for paint. Ditto the rear one, which needed a lot more rubbing down where the silicone contamination occurred. I sprayed the front bumper first. The paint went on beautifully and covered the entire surface without any problems. The finish is a little more textured than the gloss black before but nothing excessive. Then I did the same to the rear bumper. And the front grille. By the time I finished, I was high as a kite on the fumes. First impressions, whilst the paint was still wet, the finish looks great. I applied numerous thin coats to both bumpers, which covered up the majority of the scratches and marks. Most importantly, there was no silicone contamination issues. Thank you again @cobblers for recommending this paint to me. Despite wearing a face mask, I acquired a deposit of black residue under my nose. I noticed a passing resemblance to a certain unpleasant Austrian chap. I can't wait to inspect the bumpers tomorrow. Expectations are high!!!
    26 points
  47. Round a mate's last night, talking to his daughter (late 20s, hairdresser). She was telling me that she'd spent several hours that day replacing a front lower arm on her Audi (2003 A4 Avant) in advance of its upcoming MOT, and she was complaining about what an utter bastard the front suspension is to work on on those cars. She also replaced a rear arm which was a piece of piss by comparison, although she did say the bush on the old one fell to bits as she took it off. There's still hope for the next generation I reckon.
    26 points
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