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MR_BOL'S EUROSHITE SCANS - New Jan 2018 - Renault 4 built by Alfa Romeo


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#31 OFFLINE   AnthonyG

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 03:39 PM

Excellent work MrB.

Do the French have less interest in run of the mill classics than the UK?
They seem to have a lot more surivivors due to the weather etc as your internet searches on lebocoin show.

#32 OFFLINE   boobydoo

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 08:40 PM

A very interesting piece, thanks.

I would have to disagree with 'Pierre' and say that I much prefer the facelift of 1973...a much cleaner, less fussy look.

Can you imagine how old fashioned the 6 must have looked against the new 14 in 1976...yet it continued til 1980!

#33 OFFLINE   worldofceri

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 08:57 PM

Amazing. You seem to have managed to translate, scan and post three amazingly dense French articles of unrivalled fascination in the time it's taken me to catch up on twenty pages of the Ebay Tat thread. We are not worthy. Please continue and I shall endeavour to absorb at least some of it whenever I get the chance.

Incidentally, did anybody else skim read the first article and briefly think the Autobianchi was owned by Edd China?

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For Edward Cima, 61-yr old shopkeeper from Turin, ...


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* 1972 VW Beetle 1200 * 2006 Kia Sorento *

#34 OFFLINE   Tayne

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 09:51 PM

.

It always amuses me that e46s vie with the PT Cruiser as the car that's too shit for Autoshite, 

 

 


#35 OFFLINE   seth

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 01:29 AM

Superb Mr_B.

I cannot imagine in my limited time of learning French I would have ever come across this phrase "a few chrome twiddly bits" More's the pity.

#36 OFFLINE   Split_Pin

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 12:50 PM

thank you for that mr bol that was an excellent read. I remember these well from holidays in majorca in the mid 90's as the only example i had ever seen was my orange plastic norev model. I must say the standard of research on the articles seems far higher than our own practical classics, where in almost every issue there are a few schoolboy errors, such as stating that the mark 3 cortina carried over the macpherson strut suspension of the previous model.

#37 OFFLINE   mouseflakes

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 10:41 PM

Ace work Mr Knackers - thanks for this.

I had a '72 6TL some time in the early nineties. It needed a bit of welding round the rear quarters and I had to fit a new engine (I used one from a 5TS). I loved it - if I was looking for such a vehicle now, I'd have a 6 over a 4 for sure.

#38 OFFLINE   andrew e

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 08:13 PM

Cor you even re-did the captions! Were you not tempted to make some of it up though Mr_B?

Carry on!
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#39 ONLINE   Mr_Bo11ox

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 03:31 PM

Alright gang, its been a couple of weeks since I did one of these, got an absolute cracker here though!!!! Keef is gonna blow a gasket i'm sure when he cops a load of this ADO16 Dolmio-burner.

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In its search for a partner to help its transformation into a full-blown car constructor, Innocenti finshed up allying itself to the British Motor Corporation. After an initial success with the Innocenti A40, the two accomplices tried a second daring exploit: to offer the front-drive 1100, which could potentially lead on to a further venture with the Mini. Italianised with a sweep of Pininfarina’s pen (he was responsible for the original design as well), the resulting car was an alert, lively machine with remarkable road behaviour, transforming the perhaps dowdy and prudish English car into a cheeky little minx of truly Italian character.

Once upon a time, not so long ago in fact, the united kingdom was a world power in car design and manufacture both in vehicles of luxury and style, but also at the more utilitarian end of the market, exporting its machines right across the world, thanks to a number of ventures and associations often seemingly illogical but always pragmatic. The BMC-Innocenti tie up came under these headings. The Itallian car market of the 50’s was a closed shop to foreigners, except to those who assembled their cars within the country such as Renault and their Alfa Romeo-built Dauphine (another article about this later!!!! Bo11ox). This was a winning strategy that helped to make A-R a serious player in a world dominated by Fiat. But, it was for diametrically opposite reasons that BMC took an interest in italy.

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The Treaty of Rome opened up a new era of economic exchanges between the 6 participating countries, who each undertook to progressively remove complex customs + excise barriers that inhibited trade between them. England, which had deliberately excluded itself from this agreement, looked like it had shot itself in the foot, but to think that would be to underestimate the skilful approach to international business which was a character of BMC at the time. They saw an opportunity in the form of Ferdinando Innocenti, who had been in the business of making and selling the famous Lambretta scooter since 1946. He had a great ambition to break into the ‘big league’ of car manufacturers, in order to have something to offer his young customers when they were no longer restricted to 2 wheels by age or financial constraints. But, not wanting to start from scratch, he looked for a partner and in the first instance turned to Germany, opening negotiations to build Goggomobil vehicles under licence. But, in 1958, the weekly news magazine ‘Epoca’ got wind of these negotiations and printed a story exposing them, which went off like a bomb and incurred full the wrath of the Fiat empire. Renault tried to bury into the still-open would shortly afterwards and approached Innocenti with a proposal to build its Dauphine. Again Fiat got wind of this deal, which had been led without the slightest discretion, and warned that such a deal would provoke an ‘economic earthquake costing thousands of jobs’.

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In the shadow of this lot, BMC made some tentative steps, sure in the knowledge that it had a product that would be a winner with the Italians – the A40 Farina, the most Italian of English cars (design by Pininfarina of course). Furthermore, the British conglomerate was more than happy to allow a certain ‘localisation’ of its product to the market in question, as was already happening in Australia, Spain, South America, New Zealand and many other countries. In this way, Innocenti would not just be an assembler under licence, but a car manufacturer in its own right. This nuance was crucially important, and was what made a deal possible where others had failed. Thus in the Autumn of 1960 the Innocenti A40 was unveiled, quickly followed by the A40S, and subsequently a couple of sporty options in the form of the Innocenti Coupé and Spider. In 1963 the ADO16 appeared in the Innocenti line-up under the name IM3 (being the third Innocenti-Morris joint effort). Mechanically, it was Alec Issigonis’ handiwork all the way, with the transverse A-series and in-sump gearbox, side-mounted radiator, front discs and rear drums. Not for the first time, the general lines of the car had been defined by Reg Job, with Pininfarina taking over to finalise the design and again ‘Italianise’ it for the Innocenti version (which had a certain air of the Innocenti Primula about it). Compared to the UK model, the front face was completely restyled with vertical oval headlight assemblies incorporating the sidelights and indicators and a full-width grille of hefty chrome strips. At the back, the reversing lights were fitted either side of the standard square Italian rear plate The pressed steel wheels had chrome hubcaps of a new design and the fuel filler was hidden behind a flap, all of which completed the package of bodywork mods. Inside, a lot of changes were afoot, with a complete new dashboard featuring two large dials, an improved steering column design which gave amore vertical angle to the wheel, and new reclining seats with a drop-down armrest for the rear passengers. The mechanicals came straight from the MG1100, including twin carbs which gave 55-58 horsepower and a max speed of 148km/h.

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Deliberately conceived as a luxurious car with a small engine to take advantage of the tax rules, the IM3 was nevertheless an expensive product. Offered at 1,290,000 lire, it looked pricey next to a fiat 1100 (960,000), a more powerful and sophisticated Lancia Fulvia (1,348,000), or even the ageing but a still appealing Alfa Giulietta (1,250,000). To try to improve this situation, Innocenti launched the I4, which was essentially a UK-style Morris 1100 including its more basic dashboard and seats, single SU and 50hp which gave 130kph. This was offered at 1,090,000 lire and quickly took off, selling twice as many as the IM3S. Surfing a wave of success, Innocenti offered another version, ths I4S, which consisted of the I4 fitted with the more powerful twin-carb engine, and confusingly the IM3 then became the IM3S with a few more mods to take it even further upmarket – new 3-branch steering wheel, floor mats, new grille design, new softer clutch, improved inlet manifold and other minor tweaks. In 1970 all these models would be rep[laced by the I5 which took the I4S mechanicals, and a new black plastic grille, Mini Cooper-style hubcaps, horizontal speedometer, lockable glovebox and some new gear ratios. The price of this variant was 1,180,000, i.e. little more than the basic single-carb I4. But the model was getting on in age, and production finally ended in October 1972. By the end, 65,000 examples had been built in just under 10 years, including the grey IM3S of Pierre Luigi-Tonti pictured here. “I was 12 when my dad, in 1966, swapped his Fiat 600 for this secondhand car which, when new was worth twice the price of a 600! My dad liked it so much that, at the end of the ‘70s, when this car was no longer available, he went straight out and bought an Allegro, its natural descendant.” It was thus in 1998 that P-L had the idea of finding an IM3S. ‘It seemed like mission impossible, considering how many ADO 16’s were built in Italy, but the IM3S was ultimately a small proportion of the total output. It was months before I found one, in Brescia. It was very close to Christmas and I was as excited as all little boys are on Christmas eve – the seller had told me the car was in excellent condition, with the plastic protectors still on the door trims. Unfortunately, on the day of collection, the seller had a change of heart and decided to keep it!!! I said to myself, ‘Ah well, it took six months to find one, so I should be able to find another before the summer’ but in the event 10 years went by before I found this one, in jan 2009!”

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The story of this IM3S is remarkable. Bought new in 1967 by a Piedmontese lady living at Vignale, it was in service for 20 years before failing its MOT on not having seatbelts and the brakes being insufficiently powerful. Two easily-fixed problems, but Madam had already decided she fancied an upgrade to a new Fiat Uno, and this was a sign of destiny. So the brave Innocenti then found itself parked up in the Fiat dealer’s workshop for…..22 years! When P-L discovered it, he could not believe his eyes. Although dusty, the bodywork had just a couple of minor dings with no rot, and the mileometer showed just 21,000km from new, which was backed up by some service stickers in the engine bay. “The garage owner even gave me some front pads and a new master cylinder that he had bought from Papurallo (Innocenti specialist in Turin). I brought it home on a trailer, just out of caution really, though I think I could have driven it home because with a new battery and some fresh petrol it started straight up and sounded sweet!!! Nevertheless I’ve done a few bits on it, including sourcing the right clutch fluid reservoir, new tyres (in the rare 5.50-12 size), a new custom-made battery of the right shape, size and look, as I could not find a suitable off-the-shelf one that fitted! As for the bodywork, all I’ve done is wash it with soap and water. I’ve left the couple of minor dings done by the previous owner, and I’ve installed the radio from my Dad’s old IM3S – he kept it when he traded his in.”

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The interior of P-L’s car, in genuinely perfect condition, reveals a very cosy ambiance – you get some sporting elements including very comprehensive instrumentation - rev counter, speedometer, fuel and temp gauges, oil pressure gauge, two mileometers and seven warning lights! But there’s also an feeling of luxury due to the remarkable equipment levels; reclining seats, dipping rear view mirror, rear elbow-rests on the doors, 3 x grab handles, rear belt mounting points, factory floor mats, sun visors which swing through 90deg, child locks on the rear doors, lockable glovebox etc etc…. As for the levels of room, the front passengers are very comfortable, though the rear ones have to sit rather upright on the rear seat. The boot is not massive, especially if you have 4 people on board and all their luggage, and the bulky fuel filler pipe renders quite a big chunk of the boot unusable.

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The best feature of the car is elsewhere. The driving position is so low-set that you feel like you’re sitting on the floor. The mechanical set-up conceived by issigonis allows this and facilitates such a low (or low-feeling) centre of gravity that the roadholding is genuinely worthy of the finest superlatives one can think of. Its extarordianry. In corners the car feels like a go-kart, with barely any roll and just slight understeer on acceleration like the very best of front-drive cars. Even more amazing for anyone who is familiar with Minis is the ride comfort, thanks to its interconnected Hydrolastic suspension system which in ‘normal’ driving displays quite a soft and comfortable ride, but which during sprited cornering magically permits only the slightest body roll. The overall impression is of a level of agility which even today is exemplary. “Its an English car at heart” says P-L, “but with a distinct Italian side to its character, in the way you can almost make it dance on the road, make the engine sing, and play tunes with the gear lever. I will never tire of searching to make a better compromise of the three while driving”. The glint in Pierre-Luigi's eye as he’s saying this describe it more clearly than the best-written discourse.

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#40 OFFLINE   garycox

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 04:10 PM

An interesting read as always. Thanks again for finding the time to do these translations.

1967 Simca 1301
1981 Austin Morris Mini 1.0 HL

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#41 OFFLINE   seth

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 05:38 PM

Another great read Bo11.

I guess I knew these existed (or at least certainly the A40s) but didn't really know the story behind Innocenti's car production or the earlier failed attempts. Interesting that BMCs CKD with local content policy made these possible.

Also just had a very quick google on the Coupe/Spider. I need to look into that a bit more...

#42 ONLINE   Mr_Bo11ox

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 06:06 PM

I'd freakin love one of these Innocentis, the 1100 is a great car alright but I agree they are a bit dowdy. One with a dellorto carb and a 60's italian snazzy interior sounds like my kinda car!!! The shape is great already and looks pretty stylish, but the detailaing and interiors of the UK ones look a bit stodgy to me. Not as stodgy as the 1800 like but for me the 1800 has absolutely no pretensions of style of any sort so it gets away with it.

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CHECK OUT MY AWARD-WINNING SHITE-FIXING BLOG HERE

"THE 2.3 POWERTRAIN IS A SILENT IS AS A FISH, AND IT PULLS LIKE A GREAT"
"Full luxury cream leather with walnut fascists"

"Car shows are full of mentals talking tosh"

"I had no doubt it would pass, but unbelievably, to mine and the MoT tester's amazement, it passed"


#43 OFFLINE   carlo

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 06:09 PM

Fascinating.

Are those standard issue ADO016 seats? Look forward to an article on the short-lived Innocenti Regent, their take on the Allegro!

#44 OFFLINE   warren t claim

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 06:10 PM

Thanks for posting!

Reading the article has given me a better insight into the murky world of Italian politics.

I'm surprised Mr Agnelli (sp) didn't have the Mafia burn the factory down.
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#45 OFFLINE   The Reverend Bluejeans

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 06:14 PM

Are those standard issue ADO016 seats?


No, they're special. It looks as though apart from the running gear, the whole car was made from imported and locally made panels and trim.

It's nice but I still prefer a Mark 1 Morris. The funny dash with the Mark 11 A40 instrument cluster is part of the 1100 mystique. :lol:

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#46 ONLINE   Mr_Bo11ox

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Posted 22 May 2011 - 07:48 AM

OK heres some more euroshite, scanned this ages ago but could never be ar$ed to post it up!

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In its 16-year career, the Alfa Giulia was 19 different cars. Engines, bodyshells, evolutions. If you add the sporting options (GT, GTa, GTC convertible, Junior Zagato, TZ) and the sprint and Spider models (actually these were Giulietta models with the Giulia’s 1600 twink) you can get as far as 50 models! Todays marketing babble loves to talk about ‘brands within brands’ to explain this kind of proliferation. In Alfa’s case it was more of an unexpected level of success, with the various adaptations hitting the intended sales spots with perfect accuracy.
Nevertheless, on the 27th June 1962, at the Monza autodrome, where the car press discovered the new Giulia, there was hardly a euphoric reception. This car, intended to slot between the ageing Giulietta, the disappointing 2000 range and the licence-built Renault dauphine in Alfa’s range, did not look immediately like a winner. To be sure, it looked like it would be a good drive, as technically it was a Giulietta with a bigger and more powerful engine, uprated front suspension and improved rear axle location. But stylistically, it was not great. The engineers went to great lengths to explain the aerodynamic benefits of the truncated tail, the unusual four-light front end and the slighty tortured cubism of the new car, but this was not enough to stem some sharp-tongued commentators. Ugly, ill-proportioned, rolling soap box..... the imagination of motoring journos is limitless when they find something to criticise. Especially when they feel let down. But, Alfa had been leading them up the garden path for some time already, dispersing wobbly rumours and half-truths about their forthcoming product to keep nosy parkers and industry gossips on their toes. Journalists of the time had all thought they were looking forward to a front-driver that the Milanese marque had had in development for some years. It even had a model number, the 104. Some leaks had ‘revealed’ that it had an 896cc twink of 52hp/5500rpm, fitted transversely with a 4-spd box. Grainy photos of it had done the rounds and in front of the Giulia, there was more than a striking similarity.... The Giulia was the same car but bigger! “All that gossip and blather for this! Another RWD! And with dodgy styling!!”

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A sporting image

It was nevertheless the sheer insolence of this unusual styling that finally would capture the loyalty of even the most reticent Alfisti. Just as much as the mechanicals which, at the time, were much better received. We find therefore the classic all-alloy twin cam from the Giulietta, increased to 1570cc with a power output of 92hp @ 6200 revs. The all-synchro 5-speed box was quite something for the time, and between them a top speed of 169km/h was impressive work. To slow the pocket rocket, brakes remained an all-drum system, though with a triple-shoe arrangement at the front, like the first Giulietta SS models. This set-up did nothing to help combat brake fade, a problem with these Alfas, but it did shorten stopping distances considerably. One other key new feature of these early models was the front bench seat, which theoretically permitted the carriage of 6 people with the aid of a column gearchange.
The first models, marked ‘Ti’ (Turismo Internazionale) really only took off when prodction of the Giulietta ended, and it started being offered in more powerful versions (Super, Quadrifolglio) which started to shape is sporting image. At the same time, the range grew in other directions. The 1300cc Giulietta engine was offered with a lower trim level option. In 1965 came the 1600 super with 98hp and improved interior trim, and in the following year came the 1300Ti with 85hp and a new dashboard across the range. Over the years, many mechanical and bodywork tweaks took place, until 1974 when the range had a significant overhaul including a more conventional headlight + bonnet treatment, and the name Giulia was replaced by ‘Nuova Super’. There even came a diesel option, the first Italian passenger car to be offered with such an engine, though it was not terribly well received. It was a somewhat disappointing vehicle, with a fairly dismal 1760cc 50hp Perkins engine, that Alfa knew from earlier experiments with their P12 commercial vehicle. It was barely worthy of its Alfa Romeo badges and no more than 6000 examples were produced.

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The car of choice for Police…. And the bad guys

An Alfa can only be a sporting vehicle. Even the cooking saloons majored in driving appeal and delicious twin-cam soundtrack to snare customers. It may come as a surprise, then, to learn that the Giulia was the car of choice for both the municipal and the National police forces in Italy? Certainly, in the little villages you would meet plenty of Fiat 600’s and 1100’s done out in police colours, but between 1964 and 1974, the default option was the Giulia. Not only for the cops, in fact but also for the robbers too. Its performance and roadholding were difficult to match at the time. Its impossible to count the number of itallian films in which two Milanese saloons – one white, beige or blue – the three most poular hues – an the other inevitably olive green with the blue light on the roof and siren behind the grille, caught up in some epic chase through a crowded city or along twisting mountain roads. See: L’uccello con le piume di cristallo, (Dario Argento, 1970) La Polizia incrimina la legge assolve (Enzo G. Castellari, 1973), Milano trema la Polizia vuole giustizia (Sergio Martino, 1973), Cani Arrabbiati (Mario & lamberto Bava, 1974) or Bruttti, sporchi e cattivi (Ettore Scola, 1976) for samples of this twin cam chase action. [Someone ought to search YouTube for this stuff… ]

The favourite Giulia of the Police was the 1300 Ti and the 1300 Super, although a certain number of 1600 Ti & Super versions did join the forces of order. Above all, the 1600 Super Speciale, specially developed for the police who patrolled the motorway network, and built with estate bodywork and panelled-in rear side windows. Design and manufacture of these cars was entrusted to a small Milanese coachbuilder named Colli (founded in 1931). Their offering retained the saloon’s rear doors, extended the roof, and, carefully conserving the characteristic rear-end styling of the Giulia, featured a custom-made tailgate which extended down to the bumper, and which included the rear lights and numberplate.
Colli was skilled in this field. Since WWII, it had specialised in low-volume adaptations and prototypes. Its main earner was transforming Fiat 1100’s into coupes and single-seater competition cars. In 1953 it presented a pretty coupe on Panhard 750 mechanicals, and we also have to thank it for a few interesting Alfa derivatives; long-wheelbase 1900 6-seater saloon and two versions of an oddball 4-dr Giulietta saloon featuring conventional and reverse-rake rear windows. Between 1958 and 1962 it produced a small number of Giulietta estates with side-opening rear doors and reinforced rear suspension for carrying ½-ton loads. But the Italians of the time were not keen on estates, reckoning they were only for farmers and tradesmen. Just 91 of these creations were built.

An estate for the Police

In view of this lot it was not a great surprise to find Colli working on the Giulia and quickly offered a conventional (fully glazed) estate version. Unfortunately it is not known exactly how many were built, seemingly Colli kept very tight hold of such details. It was in 1966 that Coli was approached by the Police, for whom it had previously built a number of 1900 Super saloons with opening fabric roofs. Over a period of a few weeks, it carefully modified its Giulia Estate to satify the specifications laid down by the police. Thus the rear side windows were panelled in, and instead of a rear seat, a kind of shelf was installed, ostensibly to provide an ‘out-of-view’ storage area for police equipment, but more realistically to give a flat loading area in the rear section. The first SS models were delivered at the beginning of 1967 to the Rome force, but Colli was suffering some financial problems which shortly afterwards caused its downfall. The following year, the Police had to take the project to another supplier, which was Giorgetti Coachbuilding in Tuscany. Compared to Colli’s efforts, Giorgetti simplified the construction process significantly; he arranged for cars to arrive from A-R without rear window, rear seats or bootlid. Without chopping the rear panel, he manufactured a sort of half-tailgate that closed into the original boot aperture. He also fitted a small fabric roof in line with a new Police idea, which favoured this feature for surveying traffic in the case of jams or accidents.

Recycled in the 80’s

It is reckoned that approximately 400 of these cars were built, all based on 1600 Supers with the last being built in 1974, around the changeover point from Giulia to Nuova Super. One model was built on the new bodyshell, painted in the new blue and white scheme which appeared in 1975 and which is still in use today (the paint scheme i mean). They all stayed in service until 1979 without being resprayed from the olive green colour (unlike the saloon versions, strangely). They were all auctioned off in 1979/80 and, contrary to what you might expect were snapped up, mainly by newsagents and paper deliverers, who appreciated the ½-ton carrying capacity. Most were resprayed in civilian colours.
The example we’re looking at is from 1972 and is part of the 60-odd vehicles in the Italian Historic Police Vehicle Collection. After many years of loyal service in Florence, this Speciale was bought by an individual who did not bother respraying it and the original inscriptions have been meticulously restored by the Turin Police’s vehicle engineers. Like all its sisters, this Speciale has a rack bolted in the rear which accommodates 5 roadisgns to be used during problems on the motorways. On the right side of it, a ‘key’ to ensure the right sign goes in the right slot, and on the bottom shelf a space for a small number of traffic cones. On the right of the load area beside the tailgate hinge (the tailgate is extraordinarily heavy by the way, the Colli version must have needed two policemen to lift it!) is a socket where a second blue light plugs in. Under the massive trunk which has replaced the rear seat, (the lid of which makes a very temporary dickey seat), you find a police radio and a stock of lanterns for illuminating traffic accidents at night.

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Artisan Manufacture

On the headlining, there is a zip which gives access to the roof-mounted blue light. “Not all the Speciales have this” says Paolo Mazzini, one of the chief technicians of the museum. “these cars were hand built and there are many differences from one to the next”. Such as the tailgate supports; this model has two gas struts, others have a single, simple folding bracket. The exhaust is the classic central exit of the Giulia, though some examples came with a transverse rear silencer and extension on the tailpipe, to prevent fumes re-entering the car while it was ticking over with the tailgate open. Beyond the rear section and the radio & siren controls, the dashboard of this Giulia is identical to the conventional saloon models, though this one wears an instrument binnacle from a later ‘Giulia Unificata’. “I found the right one for sale in Milan’, says Paolo, ‘But it came up at a time when we had busted our budget for the year. I therefore had to wit till another came along. Unfortunatley I’ve never seen another since!” Another little detail for Giulia technologists; the seat runnrers are longer than a standard model, to accommodate to tallest members of the Police force in their regulation boots. The inscriptions ‘Autostrada’ on the doors do not just tell us the place of work of this SS, but also its owner. In fact, many of these cars were actually owned by the motorway management and loaned to the police under a no doubt slightly dodgy arrangement. The fog lights of this example are an accessory present on most ‘official’ Alfas. However, the Speciale does not have any flashing lights behind the grille –just the police siren.

Alfa Ambiance

At the wheel of this Speciale, thanks to the Motorway logos on the doors and the slightly strange silhouette, one does not immediately seek to play cops and robbers. This car has known more grisly accidents than glamorous getaways. Nevertheless, the ambiance on board is very similar to the classic Giulia. As soon as you turn the key, and hear the burble of the all-alloy twin cam, you’re in familiar territory. The engine spins up quickly and the gearbox is very slick and cooperative, featuring an action that the later Alfetta, with its long selector mechanisms and rear-mounted transaxle, could not hope to match. Despite the additional 250kg or so over the saloon, the on-road behaviour is very similar, and with 104hp on tap it feels like a powerful car, even if the load in the back takes the edge of any oversteering ideas you might have. Body roll is significant, like all live axle Alfas. The steering is quick and precise and makes the Special a pleasurable car to drive. “Its still very much an Alfa” says Paolo. You can quickly se why the the police were so attached to these cars, and why many hold back a tear when encountering one today, even a civilian one. So the Giulia is ugly? Come on now, we all got over that a long time ago…..
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#47 Guest_Leonard Hatred_*

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Posted 22 May 2011 - 07:59 AM

104bhp! I'm surprised it weighs 250kg more than the saloon, that's quite a percentage gain. I saw a couple of these in Cyprus, including a very rorty sounding saloon that overtook us, they're very small in the flesh.

The estate/van looks really useful but I'd have to fit a Perkins diesel.

#48 OFFLINE   Mr Lobster

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Posted 22 May 2011 - 08:00 AM

Excellent, ta!

I've got that issue of Gazoline in my 'french car mag pile' upstairs which I (very slowly) sort of read.

Model of your shite, sir?

 

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#49 OFFLINE   Mr_Bo11ox

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Posted 22 May 2011 - 08:01 AM

the 250kg presumably includes all that police shite in the boot mind you.

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#50 ONLINE   michiel

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Posted 22 May 2011 - 11:03 AM

250 kilos of stale donuts and empty espresso cups? Nice scans & trans(lations) Signore Testicoli!

#51 OFFLINE   Mr_Bo11ox

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Posted 22 May 2011 - 11:06 AM

Stale donuts, coffee cups and the general day-to-day paraphernalia required by fascists and bent officials.

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#52 ONLINE   Mr_Bo11ox

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 10:32 PM

OMG ANCIENT THREAD REVIVAL!!! Got a new scan for you here, well its more of a photograph as getting the scanner out the cupboard is a right ballache at castle_bo11ox. See what you make of this, its from a magazine that would cause most shiters to literally shit their whack:

Posted Image

Anyway i've translated the Taunus article as theyre quite an appealing machine I reckon, here goes:

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In France, this model of Taunus sold by the truckload. Its stylish, americanesque looks made it a favourite with families across the Hexagon. So of course it has a few admirers today who remember it from their days in short trousers. . .

As we told you in our recent article on the Sierra, Ford of Europe was the result of an effort to integrate the German and British arms of the Ford empire, which followed until then their own paths, which led to unhelpful intercompany competition in export markets. It was with the Transit and then the Escort that the anglo-german synergies started to bear fruit, and the project ‘Taunus-Cortina 1’ illustrates perfectly the union between Cologne and Dagenham. The newcomer had to be a hit across all the export markets, and thus took a fairly conservative form. Starting with the names, which would stay with the Taunus tag (in service since 1939 in Germany) and Cortina, born in 1962.
The car was even a reverse step in some regards compared to the German P4 and P6 Taunii, which had been, to general surprise, front-wheel-drive. In this case both german and English versions would use a rwd platform, with helicoidal rear springs, and double wishbone front suspension. In terms of engines the sohc Pinto and the rustic Cologne V6 were employed. The upper end of the range were actually pretty powerful cars, recalling the 20M and 26M ‘P7’ go faster models of taunus. The other key virtue was of course a colossal range, with 4 different bodyshells and 3 different engines to mix and match. A range that would only get larger in time….

Solid, and flattering at the same time

Ford of course were masters in the art of flattering the customer. Admire the shapes of the bodyshell: huge bonnet with a V-shaped tip (thanks to the efforts of Semon ‘Bunkie’ Knudsen, whose name would be forever associated with this model of taunus), imposing shapes, curved waistline rising above the rear wheels, the whole car seems ‘opulent’. Particularly in the top-line XL and GXL versions, where ford didn’t hold back on the chrome trims and vinyl roofs, American style – far from the austerity of a 304 or the lightness of the GS. For the majority of families spending their own hard-earned and choosing between the modernity of a Citroen or the rigourous good sense of a Peugeot, the Taunus had attractions that were difficult to ignore. Customers could come to the showroom and admire the 2.3 GXL coupe on a rotating platform, then drive off smiling in a modest 1.3L saloon…
In terms of sales & marketing the TC1, rustic as it was, was a great success, being, between 1971 and 1974, the biggest-selling imported car in France. One of these cars so familiar in the French motoring landscape, that it can somehow almost disappear without even being noticed. Fortunately, for a few years now, a growing number of admirers are looking after survivors and bringing them out of the shadows. Proof of that is the band of keen followers assembled for us today.

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Leaving it to chance works out well sometimes

To be honest I bought this TC1 coach a bit by accident. It was for a particular event; I was searching for a car with sufficient class and allure to take us to church on my wedding day! I’d spotted this Taunus a while earlier. One sunny day I asked the owner what he planned to do with it, and he said he’d had it sat around for 10 years! He reckoned it was most likely bound for the scrapyard. I offered him 300€ and immediately became the new owner.
That said, there was work to do, on the engine, bodywork and interior. I had 10 months to get it sorted, and with my car mechanics qualificatrions in my back pocket, it seemed feasible. Even if, since I finished studying in 2003, I hadn’t really got in any deeper than routine maintenance on moderns. As it turned out, it was 10 months of very pleasureable work. I started on the body first. I stripped it right down, treated all the rust, and resprayed it completely. I’ve changed the interior, fitted a set of GT seats, a new headlining and new door and window seals. Mechanically, I’ve changed a few gaskets, changed all the fluids, new cambelt, ignition parts and so on.
During these works I found plenty of help and advice on the net, and it was through the net that I joined the Taunus TC1 club. I’ve swapped tips and what have you, and found odd rare bits including a mint rev-counter. The Taunus passed its MOT first time and in sufficient time for its wedding duties, which brought an extra smile to my wife’s face. Since, its fired up a passion for these forgotten cars which are now very rare.

Captions:
1) the 2-dr saloon (called ‘coach’) sold very few outside its native Germany. On this example the bullet mirrors are of course non-original.
2) Dished wheel, false wood, sculptured centre console - the interior and its spectacular dashboard are very American-looking. Some of the charm waqs lost with the later ‘bis’ models from late 1973 onwards.
3) The vinyl roof is part of the GXL package, along with the four-light grille and the black finish on the rear panel. Whats more 70’s than a vinyl wig?

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‘It was part of my childhood’

“When I was born, back in 1973, my parents bought their first Ford, a Taunus TC1 1300 saloon, dark brown colour. Then, when my sister arrived, the family changed to a more spacious TC1 ‘bis’ Estate, also a 1300 in Ermine white. I’ve still got plenty of photographs of this car which was part of my childhood. Notably with memories of the load bay filled up to the roof with bags and suitcases and the caravan hooked on the back, or with the rear seat folded down so we could play games and then sleep on long journeys….
Then at 16, I had my first taste of accompanied driving at the wheel of the estate, and with my license in my pocket, my parents handed me the keys; “It’s a present – take care of it!” Pure class! Even if my mates pulled my leg about its dated looks, I liked it and was very proud of it! I had to let it go a few years later and replaced it with a Sierra 1.6l with an opening roof and 5 speeds. It was Ok the Sierra, but it couldn’t do anything any better than the Taunus, which I always felt more at home with. Finally, 13 years went by before I got another one, in lousy condition, but I planned to restore it. But then, at a gathering of Taunus lovers, the organiser lent me this blue 1974 2.0 estate, with an immaculate interior and excellent bodywork. A marvel!! I was in love! Shortly after he offered the car to me for a very good price, and you can see what happened. Since then, the robustness of the car has meant I’ve only needed to do a bit of routine maintenance, mainly I have just been clocking up thousands of happy kilometres, whether on daily work-related tasks or weekend trips away. I plan to keep it as long as possible as I love it!

Captions:
1) The TC1 ’Bis’ replaced the 2.0V6 with a 2.0 pinto which was actually more powerful. The big engines are rare in the estate models, with just a small number of 2.3 v6 estates being produced.
2) The load volume is more impressive with the seats down: over 1.8m3! Thans notably to the extended rear overhang,
3) The grille on this car originates from an ‘L’model, the ‘XL’ normally coming with rectangular lights.

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Bought from the original owner!

Around the time I passed my driving test, there was a Taunus that drove around the town where we lived. I was always intrigued by the American looks of the car. Then a few months ago, when I was putting my bike away, I noticed the neighbours tinkering with their VW beetle opposite my garage. When I got in, I quipped to my flatmate that I’d love an old motor. After a bit of internet digging I came upon this Taunus, based near Annecy. 2 weeks later, I owned it….
Despite its age (39yrs), it was a one-owner car, and my colleague who took me to pick it up congratulated the old boy for looking after it so well. He had tears in his eyes when I drove it away. At the time it had 37,000 km on the clock. However as the clock only has 5 digits, I don’t know if its 137,000 or 237,000, or what. (I don’t know why he didn’t just ask the fuggin old boy when he bought it) The kilometrage of this car always comes up a ‘hot topic’ when I take it to a club meet!
Anyway, all I’ve done is repaint the steel wheels, get some new tyres, fit electronic ignition and get a new stereo. I am aware that it needs a bit of TLC on the bodywork, which I will get around to, but in the meantime I keep it out of the rain as much as possible! During the week, I use a modern. The Taunus is just for fun at weekends, but I always feel it has much more charisma than a modern anyway. My girlfriend and our youngsters love it! I think they particularly like the lack of seatbelts in the back, although that sometimes makes me feel a bit guilty when I’m all belted up in the front!

Captions:
1) The V6 versions have this little red logo on each front wing. Ford were masters in the art of flattering the customer!
2) The V6 ‘cologne” (as opposed the Essex V6 of UK cars) first appeared in 1964 in the taunus 20M P5. Its an all-iron unit with a single central camshaft. More US inspiration!
3) The GT and GXL models received a 3-dial instrument pack with a rev counter. The GXL also gained the vinyl roof and heated rear window.

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My second yellow coupé!

I came to the world of old motors via the 2CV, of which I’ve owned 3 examples. One day, entirely by chance, I came across a small ad for a TC1 1300 coupe, XL model in a snazzy yellow colour. The interior and the body certainly looked smart. It was not a model I knew well, in fact to be honest I’d never even heard of it. But, as soon as I saw it, I really fell for its lines and its ‘pert little ass’! So the 2CV got punted on, and with the money from its sale, I bought myself an American! (well a German actually).
When I got my hands on this car, I joined the Taunus club at the same time, of which the members have helped me out a lot with tips and knowledge about this model, which only has two real weaknesses, rusty bodywork and self-detaching gear levers.
Again entirely by chance, at a garage that I used from time to time, I found the GXL coupe. Over 15 years dry stored in an underground garage, in perfect original condition, interior spared the sun, hidden from the boy-racers and the bodgers, basically the holy grail!!! On top of that, the colour is Gold metallic, my favourite, maybe because of its rarity. The garage guy had bought it originally to pinch its V6, but in the end, through lack of time, and perhaps when he saw how keen I was, he offered it to me. I’ve now had it two years, but I don’t get as much time to work on it as I’d like. I’ve done a bit on the mechanical side, sorting out the ignition and the brakes as time and budgets have allowed. As soon as I can afford it, I plan to get the bodywork seen to, with a complete re-spray. Its not very rusty, but needs TLC to stay in good condition. As for the first coupe, I sold it…. To a chap who got rid of his 204 to buy it!!! Addictive, these cars!

Captions:
1) The rare coupe has a proper rear seat with central armrest, despite the low roofline. It’s a more family-friendly Capri alternative!
2) The silhouette of this car and its soft, smooth V6 reinforce the American influence of the Taunus. Much like its handling and roadholding, which is somewhat ‘approximate’….

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A family affair

This car, I’ve always known it!!!! Its been in my family since the middle of the 70’s, having belonged to my godfather and my granddad. Back then, my parentd didn’t have driving licences, so we went on holiday with my grandparents every August, into the Auvergne or down to the Cote d’Azur. At the beginning of the 19990’s, she was parked up at the back of the garage under some dust sheets, where she stayed for 18 years! Then in 2009, I became the owner, after cutting my teeth on a 2CV. So I was the 3rd family owner!
Over the course of a year, with the help of a former Ford mechanic, we carried out a serious mechanical overhaul, replaced most safety-related items, while trying to dial out some of the weaknesses of an older car, in order to maximise reliablilty. Bodywise, we were lucky – one single rust spot! A good helping of elbow grease was all the paintwork needed to get its shine back. The interior was also very well preserved, and just needed a good clean.
In fact, this car had never been modified, and I would say is 95% original.Its entirely capable of travelling 800km in a day, as I have proved! Mostly, I use it for commuting and weekend duties. I’m mainly in the Parisian region and despite only having 59bhp it has no trouble dealing with the city traffic. The engine may be small, but the comfort, interior space and large boot make it a very practical and usable car. Its mechanical simplicity and reliability make it a great way to travel around in a 1970’s car without worries. It will always get you where you want to go!

Captions:
1) The asymmetric dashboard of the later ‘bis’ models is a bit less cool than the earlier TC1. However the standard equipment would make a DS blush!
2) The chrome wheelarch trims make up part of the XL specification. Its all in the suggestion!
3) With its ‘shrunken full size sedan’ aspect, the TC1 has a capacious boot into which a couple of bodies would fit no problem, allowing you to roar off with a screech of tyres!

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Buyers guide

Although 1,106,771 examples were produced, with 142,213 units sold in France, the TC1 lived for just 5 busy years. Nonetheless, it can be difficult to find a specific model, due to the complexity of the range. The TC1 appeared in summer 1970 and was replaced in January 1976 but the completely revised TC2 (Mk4 cortina). There was a mid-life ‘upgrade’ to the TC1 ‘bis’ model, which is identifiable by a more modern but less interesting dashboard, double chrome strips in the grille, rear anti-roll bar and front ARB on the 1300 and 1600 models which had managed without previously. The 2.0 versions were changed from the 90hp Cologne V6 to the 99bhp 4-cyl Pinto at the same time. Be aware that there are 2 versions of the 1.6 engine as well, 72hp on all versions except the French-market only GT coupe (black grille and tail panel, long-distance driving lights, bucket seats, rev counter, unique centre console etc) which had 85hp. The trim levels are legion: standard (round lights, bare bumpers, body-colour window frames, rubber mats), L (rubber-trimmed bumpers, chrome window frames, proper carpets), XL (rectangular lights, wheel embellishers, chrome trims on the wheelarches, tail panel, rear lights, uprated interior with armrests front and rear, fake wood etc), and GXL (all the XL gear plus the aforementioned GT coupe trinkets, chrome side trims, vinyl roof, heated rear window)…. Would you like an aspirin?

For the TC1, the days when you could pick up an unwanted minter for a few groat are over. The many chrome bits and American looks mark them out as a ‘classic car’ in 2012, and they are much appreciated by the Germans, who have taken a lot of examples back home with them. That said, they are not an expensive car; 1000€ for one needing work, and maybe 2000€ fwill buy you most models in good working order. Of course, the coupe, V6, and GXL models are the most sought-after, and estates and 2-dr saloons are rare. Generally the pre-facelift models are the most appreciated and the dashboard certainly is more appealing than the later offering.

IN terms of inherent problems, beyond rust theres not a lot to worry about with a Taunus. Bodywork wise, check the rear arches first, then the inner wing top edges where the outers bolt on and the outers themselves round the indicators. Obviously like all old cars the sills, door bottoms and valances should be inspected. Be careful as many bodywork parts are impossible to find, including the lower-cut windscreen of the coupé. Mechanically they are pretty much unburstable, and any routine repairs that are needed can be done cheaply and easily, brake parts, clutches and the like are very cheap and easy to fit. Inside, the vinyl interiors are tough but the cloth ones suffer sun damage and replacement bits can be difficult to find.

Servicing is a piece of cake, oil change every 5000 miles, spark plugs with every other oil change, check the ignition out now and again and on the Pinto models change the cambelt every 30,000 miles or 3-4 years. Check oil levels in the gearbox and diff once a year or more often if they drip a bit. The mechanicals are very tough and have to suffer serious neglect before they let you down. Just concentrate on the driving!!!!

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#53 ONLINE   cort16

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:00 PM

Top Thread rez-erection. I have to say those Taunus coupes look mega.There was one for sale on buysellcortina last year for not much money but I didn't hav the £ at the time.
I'll need to sit down and read the full thing when I've got half an hour..

I estimate this car needs £3000 maybe £4000 spending on it to get it rite and when this is done it will be wotrth about £1500!!


#54 OFFLINE   Mr Lobster

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:03 PM

That Youngtimers magazine is the business. One of my first jobs when I get off the ferry at Calais is head to the big Auchan hypermarket to stock up on frog-shite-mags.

Model of your shite, sir?

 

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#55 OFFLINE   Mr_Bo11ox

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:03 PM

Hm those photos haven't come out too great have they. I've just translated an excellent Gazoline article on the Tagora, but not done nowt about the pictures yet, I think I will take the time to scan em (Gazoline mags fit in the scanner, unlike the 'youngtimers' mag)

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#56 ONLINE   Split_Pin

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:39 PM

Excellent, that's my reading material sorted for the train journey into work tomorrow. I've always been intrigued by those Taunuses.

Thanks for taking the time to translate that :)

#57 OFFLINE   kadams1970

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 12:14 AM

Autobianchi A111... you. are. a. legend :)

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#58 OFFLINE   Split_Pin

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 10:55 PM

That was a Qualz read, certainly preferable to trying to smack my way through HG Wells short story about a mad flying machine.

Funny how the cars look a bit like a MK4 in the middle without the Coke bottle bits.

Before I knew what these were I was confused by a Polistil 'Cortina' model that I had that didn't look quite 'right'.

#59 OFFLINE   Spottedlaurel

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 10:50 AM

I picked up a copy of that Youngtimers mag in France last year, looks good though I'm limited in my translation of it. There was a great little Honda Civic in it.

I don't think we have an equivalent here, would it do well if there was?

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And a couple of modern Toyotas


#60 OFFLINE   RoadworkUK

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 09:55 PM

I don't think we have an equivalent here, would it do well if there was?


I think Autoshite is probably as close as it gets. I dream of starting such an organ up myself; a rag catering for the tastes of those of us who choose to drive daft old cars but don't subscribe to any ridiculous "scene".
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