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Automotive Unicorns


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#1 OFFLINE   TheClutchBasketPodcast

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 08:46 PM

Hi all,

 

I am supposed to be doing my homework, finding out about rare and dying makes and models that are disappearing off our roads for the next episode of the podcast... But then I remembered that I have experts in such a topic that can do all the work for me!

 

Anyway, I am looking for some suggestions for cars to cover for this episode and any info you might have about why they are so rare i.e. sold poorly, design flaws, parts availability, rusted horribly, all died in a field in Essex etc.

 

Renault 14 is top of the list but I need 4-5 cars to get stuck into some research. I would also love it if anyone had any information about cars that are rare in markets other that the UK. Rare yank/Canadian would be great or JDM stuff a well. I know thats a bit of a longer shot as you are mostly UK based.

 

(Also, if any of you own any of the cars that you are suggesting, I would love photo's with your permission to reuse them.)


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#2 OFFLINE   pshome

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 08:57 PM

Tagora SX... all said, close the topic.


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1978 504 GL
1977 504 V6 Convertible
1982 Tagora 2.2 Automatic
2002 Zafira Diesel
2004 Corolla Diesel
2017 Duster 1.2

1986 505 Turbo Injection
1981 Talbot Tagora Dinin replica
1983 Talbot Tagora SX
1981 Talbot Tagora GLS

1984 505 Turbo Injection
1989 505 SX
1982 Talbot Tagora SX

http://www.altefranzosen.de
http://www.504cc.de
http://www.talbot-tagora.com
http://www.504forum.de
http://www.talbot-tagora.de

http://schulzeknipst.de

 


#3 OFFLINE   TheClutchBasketPodcast

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 09:02 PM

Ah, the Tagora. How could I pass that up!

 

Also, suggestions for special versions will still count. Mk1 Astra's are rare, but GTE's are more rare still. 



#4 OFFLINE   pshome

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 09:08 PM

GTE's in pink are even rarer...

Everything becomes rare if you narrow down the specs...


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1978 504 GL
1977 504 V6 Convertible
1982 Tagora 2.2 Automatic
2002 Zafira Diesel
2004 Corolla Diesel
2017 Duster 1.2

1986 505 Turbo Injection
1981 Talbot Tagora Dinin replica
1983 Talbot Tagora SX
1981 Talbot Tagora GLS

1984 505 Turbo Injection
1989 505 SX
1982 Talbot Tagora SX

http://www.altefranzosen.de
http://www.504cc.de
http://www.talbot-tagora.com
http://www.504forum.de
http://www.talbot-tagora.de

http://schulzeknipst.de

 


#5 ONLINE   red5

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 09:09 PM

Frontera A - Mk1 in laymans terms. An Isuzu rebadged and built in the old Bedford plant with Vauxhall and Opel badges ( GM, Isuzu and VM engines...)

 

Used to be 2 pages plus last year on ebay et al for just the A model - now it's all B models and a dozen (vehicles) at most.

 

 

 

 

No, I haven't bought them all.


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Discovery 2 Td5 Adventurer 

1995 2.8 Fronterror LWB

2002 GSX-R 1000 K2

Jago x-flow

BMW 318 SE Touring Auto

1992 Fronterror 2.0 swb

 

 

 

Living the AS dream  whining cunts killing the dream.

 

 

 


#6 OFFLINE   UltraWomble

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 09:09 PM

Earnshaw Diamond


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The Picasso is the future Morris Minor.

Citroen C8 Citroen Picasso Tomos Disco NVT Easy Rider Honda NH80 

 


#7 ONLINE   LightBulbFun

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 09:11 PM

Hi all,

 

I am supposed to be doing my homework, finding out about rare and dying makes and models that are disappearing off our roads for the next episode of the podcast... But then I remembered that I have experts in such a topic that can do all the work for me!

 

Anyway, I am looking for some suggestions for cars to cover for this episode and any info you might have about why they are so rare i.e. sold poorly, design flaws, parts availability, rusted horribly, all died in a field in Essex etc.

 

Renault 14 is top of the list but I need 4-5 cars to get stuck into some research. I would also love it if anyone had any information about cars that are rare in markets other that the UK. Rare yank/Canadian would be great or JDM stuff a well. I know thats a bit of a longer shot as you are mostly UK based.

 

(Also, if any of you own any of the cars that you are suggesting, I would love photo's with your permission to reuse them.)

 

any sort of invalid carriage?  :mrgreen:

 

(I think they hold the distinction of the only cars to be forcefully removed from the road by the British government :) )

 

*runs away before getting lynched*



#8 OFFLINE   Brodders

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 09:13 PM

This thread brought up some forgotten cars which have disappeared rather swiftly in recent years.

http://autoshite.com...ular-following/

2001 Rover 75 1.8 Connoisseur SE

1998 Vauxhall Omega 3.0 MV6
1968 Triumph 1300


#9 OFFLINE   TheClutchBasketPodcast

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 09:16 PM

I have recently become fascinated by Vauxhall Senators. Any owners on here with info or pics?



#10 Guest_Hooli_*

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 09:33 PM

I have recently become fascinated by Vauxhall Senators. Any owners on here with info or pics?

 

Someone (I forget who) has a A plate one if memory serves.

I always wanted a later 3.0 24v version.


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#11 OFFLINE   mk2_craig

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 09:38 PM

Are you talking about once plentiful models that have disappeared thru undesirability, poor build and rival cars with a better image (which is essentially the R14 situation) or those that were doomed to be uncommon from the start (Panther Rio, Fullbore Mark Ten) ?

1984 Ford Fiesta XR2 - Devaluing the neighbourhood since 2008

Nottinghamshite
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Everywhere Else


#12 OFFLINE   TheClutchBasketPodcast

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 09:43 PM

Are you talking about once plentiful models that have disappeared thru undesirability, poor build and rival cars with a better image (which is essentially the R14 situation) or those that were doomed to be uncommon from the start (Panther Rio, Fullbore Mark Ten) ?

 

Any rarities that have a good story. I would like to mostly keep it to things people have heard of but haven't yet realised that they haven't seen one for a decade.

 

But anything odd with an interesting reason for it's rarity is a goer.

 

Just not really interested in the Diablo's etc. It's fairly obvious that those are rare. 



#13 OFFLINE   Ghosty

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 10:48 PM

Yugos. 


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1994 Volvo 850 T5 - brittle plastic turbo bikewagon

1991 Honda Civic GL - JDM kettle

2009 Mini Cooper S - Mother Ghosty's

 

 

 


#14 OFFLINE   Pillock

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 11:31 PM

Talk to fourwheeledstool about his Polo G40s.
Not so much a fatal flaw, but they only built 500 cars and the supercharger was never used in anything else so they're simply only available from scrapped cars.

VW 412s? Designed two decades too late and a surprisingly small following considering it has the magic badge on the front.

#15 OFFLINE   Junkman

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 11:33 PM

I always wanted a later 3.0 24v version.

 

No you don't.

Trust me on that.


Have you had your Brexit today?


#16 OFFLINE   Junkman

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 11:39 PM

Yank would be the Chrysler K cars. Chucked out by the million load, you can't find one now even if you try.


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Have you had your Brexit today?


#17 OFFLINE   rml2345

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 11:57 PM

Daihatsu Applause? Come to think of it, anything Daihatsu is rare now.
Current Wheels;
1994 Volvo 850 GLT Saloon (Twice)
1990 Volvo 740 GLE Estate
Previous Wheels;
2003 Peugeot 406 HDi Saloon
2003 Rover 75 CDT Connoisseur Saloon
2003 Toyota "Leyland" Yaris T Spirit (Three times)
2002 Mitsubishi Carisma DI-D (Blob)
2001 Rover 75 CDT Tourer (Clover)
2000 Rover 75 CDT Saloon
2000 Honda Accord SE Executive
1996 Citroën Xantia Dimension (Les Hamper des Bisquites)
1996 Volvo 940 SE Turbo Estate (Beeb)
1993 Citroën AX Neon (Les Tin des Bisquites)
1994 Volvo 850 SE Saloon
1989 Volvo 740 GLE Saloon
1988 Volvo 740 GL Saloon (Telly)

#18 OFFLINE   colnerov

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 12:38 AM

 VW K70,  first of the water cooled?



#19 OFFLINE   chodweaver

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 01:07 AM

You all know I have an unhealthy fascination for Mk1 MR2s, but the Mk2 MR2 had been plentiful for many years - and then seemed to disappear suddenly from the roads in about 2016. The examples I saw in that year had almost without exception been roundly molested. I don't whether there was a mass scooping up and putting away for the winter by people spotting them as a particularly good mid-life crisis salve, whether James May's autocross outing in one in TG spurred a load of people to pick them up for similar fun while they were cheap (and they were) or whether the rot got too much for a whole raft of them at once and they all got cubed.

 

I never liked them that much, the Ferrari look didn't work on me and they were too powerful and less nimble than the Mk1 or Roadster

 

Now I really miss seeing them...


'Ridiculing shit engineering for over half a century'

 

Vomit colour Corsa 1.4 Comfort badermatic (the one constant, reliable thing in my life /Quentin)

XM 2.1 SEDTurbo (leaky driveway ornament)

LT Multicruiser (guest bedroom and backup kitchen)

Mk1 MR2 (rumours of its health are lies)

 

In the Voyager Sanitorium:

Chrysler Graf Spee Limited 3.3 + LPG (suspected OMGHGF, driver's window failure, ABS, AC and driver's seat heater failures)

Spears and reapers Chrysler Graf Spee Limited 3.3 + LPG (suspected long term abuse by PO, passenger's window failure, mingin' interior)

 

(I'm sure I've forgotten at least one...)


#20 OFFLINE   Datsuncog

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 02:22 AM

The story of the Leyland P76 makes for a ripping yarn.

This was BL's Australian Division's short-lived and unhappy foray into building a completely unique full-size car for their domestic market which, in true BL comedy of errors style, was launched slap-bang in the middle of the 1973 Energy Crisis, along with slightly shonky build quality, which the motoring press immediately ripped into.

Previously, Leyland Australia had built and sold bizarrely reskinned versions of UK cars - which looked like parallel universe versions of familiar models - badged with names like the Austin Kimberley and Morris Nomad.

With the same engines as their UK siblings, they never made much headway against the big V8 Ford Falcons, Holden Kingswoods and Chrysler Valiants which characterized Australian motoring through the 50s and 60s. An E-series unit might be fine for a Sunday drive through the Cotwolds, but yer average Aussie wouldn't necessarily trust a car that looked like the secret lovechild of an 1100 and a Maxi to get them through hundreds of dusty miles across the Nullarbor. But the P76 was set to change all that, with Leyland arriving only a decade or two late to the fight with a 4.4 litre development of their corporate ex-Buick V8, to win the day.

The Michelotti styling was decent enough, though clearly erring on the side of conservative. At its launch in 1973, the big advertising hook was - wait for it - you could fit a 44 gallon oil drum in the boot. Now, I don't know what kind of focus groups Leyland Australia convened to fine-tune their P76 marketing campaign, but in highlighting such a niche benefit, it seemed even they were grasping at straws to find something positive to say about their own car.

Which was a shame, as overall it wasn't a bad package - some press reports were rather critical, and some quality control issues did come to light (the bonded windscreen tended to crack on rough roads, amongst other teething troubles), it should be remembered that Ford and Holden had been pilloried mercilessly for their own shortcomings too.

The influential Wheels magazine voted it their Car of the Year for 1973, noting that its innovative engineering was far and away better than its rivals and it was faster and more powerful than any of the other 'Big 3' offerings.

The difference was that Ford and Holden still sold by the bucketload; the big new Leyland just didn't.

Part of the blame has to be laid at the '73 Oil Crisis, which strangled at birth a number of very interesting cars in Europe too - the timing was dreadful. Leyland Australia launched their first big, homegrown saloon at the exact moment when the big Aussie V8 saloon began its decline from eminence.

It also didn't help that all previous cars has been sold as Morris or Austin, which meant something to most drivers - whereas the new corporate Leyland name had no resonance.

Even so, there was a lot of customer interest in the new car, and that was the real trouble - there simply weren't enough cars available to dealerships to meet the initial demand. Despite the lack of meaningful branding and unusual wedge styling, over 2000 deposits were slapped down on the week of release, and before long there was a 16 week waiting list. But by that stage, only around 300 cars had actually been built - and none of them very well.

The Zetland factory had been set up to build the Austin 1800, and the sheer size of the P76 created problems with painting the shell and fitting panels on the line. In an effort to meet demand, new workers were brought in to work round the clock assembling cars, but - as John Z DeLorean later found out - it can be something of a liability to employ people with no experience in building cars and who are in no apparent hurry to learn.

At one stage, most of new cars coming off the line were not fit to be sent to those dealers screaming for something to sell, but instead had to join the ever-growing fields of cars awaiting rectification.

With losses mounting, the decision was made to ship P76s out anyway - leading to disgruntled customers complaining about cars filling with water due to appalling panel gaps and poor seals. It was not an ideal situation.

After several months of this nonsense, customer goodwill had hardened and the company found itself in a bad situation, cash wise.

Leyland Australia needed to sell 45,000 P76s a year just to break even. As it was, fewer than 18,000 found a home in the 16 months of production. Just as production stepped up, buyer numbers dropped.

Apparently, to cope with overproduction there were plans to market the P76 back in Blighty, but that was dropped amid fears it would torpedo the forthcoming Rover SD1, with which it shared a V8 engine and other engineering.

It was a workers' strike in October 1974 which ultimately finished it off, as BL pulled the plug on its unruly antipodean sibling. The UK company had sunk £50m into the P76, and decided it had no option but to cut its losses.

Like Longbridge, the Zetland factory sat in a state of suspended animation for over a year with a yard full of cars and dozens more on the assembly line - including the first run of the new Force 7 coupé, designed to beat the Holden Monaro and Chrysler Charger.

Afraid of warranty claims, nearly all the remaining cars and parts went to the crusher in 1975, and Leyland Australia spent its final few years building Minis and Mokes at its Enfield factory and importing Jaguars and Rovers. Prototypes of the P82, the intended homegrown replacement for the Marina, were also squashed.

But, interestingly, a some ten Force 7 Coupés were spared the crusher's jaws, and were auctioned off... one went to the National Motor Museum, eight went to collectors, and the last one, in navy blue, was shipped over to England for BL chief executive Lord Stokes to use as his own personal transport... I suppose mebbe he thought he was owed something back for his £50m investment...
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Rollcall of shite:

1980 Ford Cortina 1.6 L (1997); 1976 Mini Clubman 1.0 (1997); 1973 Vauxhall Viva HC 1.3 (1997-2005); 1984 Datsun Sunny B11 1.5 Coupé (1999-2000); 1983 Datsun Sunny B11 1.5 Coupé (2000); 1986 Ford Fiesta 1.1 Ghia (2001-2003); 1996 Ford Escort 1.6 LX (2003-2008); 1985 Toyota Corona 2.4 Avante (2005-2006); 1981 Ford Cortina 2.0 GL Estate (2008-2010); 1993 Volkswagen Polo 1.0 Genesis (2010); 1996 Citroen XM 2.5TD VSX Estate (2010-2011); 1988 Volvo 240 2.0 GL Estate (2011-2012); 2004 Alfa Romeo 156 1.9JTD Veloce (2012-2014); 1993 Volkswagen Polo 1.0 Fox (2013-2014); 1996 Renault Laguna 1.8 RN (2014 - 2018); 1997 Renault Laguna 2.0 RT Sport (2015-2017); 1998 Renault Laguna 1.8 RT Sport (2017 - 2018); 2003 Subaru Forester 2.0 XT (2018 - present); 2005 Toyota Yaris 1.0 VVT (OH's motor: 2005 - present)

 

822434.png 836445.png


#21 ONLINE   mitsisigma01

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 02:41 AM

Apparently the 91-96 Mitsubishi Sigma estate 3.0v6 fwd , built in Australia, apparently sold shitloads over there , then Mitsubishi tried to bring them in to compete with other luxo barges but overpriced themselves out of the market compared to BMWu's and Mercs and from what I hear from the local Mitsubishi parts man spares availability back then was shiter than it is now and not many customers wanted 3 litre front wheel drive and mostrich were automatics which were poo. The top of the range ones were quite well specced for the time but they didn't quite have the same success as in Oz , apparently only 140 ish were sold in 6 years and if howmanyleft.Com is to be believed mine is only one of two still on the road. I don't know how many Autoshiters have ever seen one , some think the Sigma is a Vauxhall, the Signum, another rarish car in its own right
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#22 OFFLINE   TheClutchBasketPodcast

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 08:21 AM

The story of the Leyland P76 makes for a ripping yarn.

This was BL's Australian Division's short-lived and unhappy foray into building a completely unique full-size car for their domestic market which, in true BL comedy of errors style, was launched slap-bang in the middle of the 1973 Energy Crisis, along with slightly shonky build quality, which the motoring press immediately ripped into.

Previously, Leyland Australia had built and sold bizarrely reskinned versions of UK cars - which looked like parallel universe versions of familiar models - badged with names like the Austin Kimberley and Morris Nomad.

With the same engines as their UK siblings, they never made much headway against the big V8 Ford Falcons, Holden Kingswoods and Chrysler Valiants which characterized Australian motoring through the 50s and 60s. An E-series unit might be fine for a Sunday drive through the Cotwolds, but yer average Aussie wouldn't necessarily trust a car that looked like the secret lovechild of an 1100 and a Maxi to get them through hundreds of dusty miles across the Nullarbor. But the P76 was set to change all that, with Leyland arriving only a decade or two late to the fight with a 4.4 litre development of their corporate ex-Buick V8, to win the day.

The Michelotti styling was decent enough, though clearly erring on the side of conservative. At its launch in 1973, the big advertising hook was - wait for it - you could fit a 44 gallon oil drum in the boot. Now, I don't know what kind of focus groups Leyland Australia convened to fine-tune their P76 marketing campaign, but in highlighting such a niche benefit, it seemed even they were grasping at straws to find something positive to say about their own car.

Which was a shame, as overall it wasn't a bad package - some press reports were rather critical, and some quality control issues did come to light (the bonded windscreen tended to crack on rough roads, amongst other teething troubles), it should be remembered that Ford and Holden had been pilloried mercilessly for their own shortcomings too.

The influential Wheels magazine voted it their Car of the Year for 1973, noting that its innovative engineering was far and away better than its rivals and it was faster and more powerful than any of the other 'Big 3' offerings.

The difference was that Ford and Holden still sold by the bucketload; the big new Leyland just didn't.

Part of the blame has to be laid at the '73 Oil Crisis, which strangled at birth a number of very interesting cars in Europe too - the timing was dreadful. Leyland Australia launched their first big, homegrown saloon at the exact moment when the big Aussie V8 saloon began its decline from eminence.

It also didn't help that all previous cars has been sold as Morris or Austin, which meant something to most drivers - whereas the new corporate Leyland name had no resonance.

Even so, there was a lot of customer interest in the new car, and that was the real trouble - there simply weren't enough cars available to dealerships to meet the initial demand. Despite the lack of meaningful branding and unusual wedge styling, over 2000 deposits were slapped down on the week of release, and before long there was a 16 week waiting list. But by that stage, only around 300 cars had actually been built - and none of them very well.

The Zetland factory had been set up to build the Austin 1800, and the sheer size of the P76 created problems with painting the shell and fitting panels on the line. In an effort to meet demand, new workers were brought in to work round the clock assembling cars, but - as John Z DeLorean later found out - it can be something of a liability to employ people with no experience in building cars and who are in no apparent hurry to learn.

At one stage, most of new cars coming off the line were not fit to be sent to those dealers screaming for something to sell, but instead had to join the ever-growing fields of cars awaiting rectification.

With losses mounting, the decision was made to ship P76s out anyway - leading to disgruntled customers complaining about cars filling with water due to appalling panel gaps and poor seals. It was not an ideal situation.

After several months of this nonsense, customer goodwill had hardened and the company found itself in a bad situation, cash wise.

Leyland Australia needed to sell 45,000 P76s a year just to break even. As it was, fewer than 18,000 found a home in the 16 months of production. Just as production stepped up, buyer numbers dropped.

Apparently, to cope with overproduction there were plans to market the P76 back in Blighty, but that was dropped amid fears it would torpedo the forthcoming Rover SD1, with which it shared a V8 engine and other engineering.

It was a workers' strike in October 1974 which ultimately finished it off, as BL pulled the plug on its unruly antipodean sibling. The UK company had sunk £50m into the P76, and decided it had no option but to cut its losses.

Like Longbridge, the Zetland factory sat in a state of suspended animation for over a year with a yard full of cars and dozens more on the assembly line - including the first run of the new Force 7 coupé, designed to beat the Holden Monaro and Chrysler Charger.

Afraid of warranty claims, nearly all the remaining cars and parts went to the crusher in 1975, and Leyland Australia spent its final few years building Minis and Mokes at its Enfield factory and importing Jaguars and Rovers. Prototypes of the P82, the intended homegrown replacement for the Marina, were also squashed.

But, interestingly, a some ten Force 7 Coupés were spared the crusher's jaws, and were auctioned off... one went to the National Motor Museum, eight went to collectors, and the last one, in navy blue, was shipped over to England for BL chief executive Lord Stokes to use as his own personal transport... I suppose mebbe he thought he was owed something back for his £50m investment...

 

That's an amazing information, thank you so much! Also, Aussie market stuff is fascinating, so this is definitely going into the episode. I will have to read the whole post more carefully when I get home later.


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#23 OFFLINE   TheClutchBasketPodcast

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 08:23 AM

Apparently the 91-96 Mitsubishi Sigma estate 3.0v6 fwd , built in Australia, apparently sold shitloads over there , then Mitsubishi tried to bring them in to compete with other luxo barges but overpriced themselves out of the market compared to BMWu's and Mercs and from what I hear from the local Mitsubishi parts man spares availability back then was shiter than it is now and not many customers wanted 3 litre front wheel drive and mostrich were automatics which were poo. The top of the range ones were quite well specced for the time but they didn't quite have the same success as in Oz , apparently only 140 ish were sold in 6 years and if howmanyleft.Com is to be believed mine is only one of two still on the road. I don't know how many Autoshiters have ever seen one , some think the Sigma is a Vauxhall, the Signum, another rarish car in its own right

 

Also a great suggestion. I must admit I had to google that one myself. There used to a millions of Gallant estates from the 90's around. Don't know if  have ever seen a Sigma in the steel



#24 OFFLINE   Talbot

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 08:32 AM

Tagora SX... all said, close the topic.


Talbot anything these days. Can't remember the last time I saw a T badge on the road. (that wasn't a portaloo welded to a Badge-enginered J5 van.)
Current fleet:  Mercedes.  Xantia.  Berlingo.  Discovery.  Forward Control.  Nova. Historic shite.

#25 OFFLINE   Tamworthbay

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 09:27 AM

Fiat Brava/ Bravo. I am sure there are a few about but when did you last see one? They used to be everywhere. And the Stilo for that matter.
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#26 OFFLINE   cms206

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 10:21 AM

Hyundai Stellar.

 

I know there are two on here, but Mat's is unique for one reason and as far as I'm aware mine is for another reason.


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'87 Volvo 740GLE - COUNCIL ESTATE EXTRA

'88 Volvo 740GLE - COUNCIL ESTATE INNIT

'88 Hyundai Stellar 1.6GSL - GOOOORRRRRRRRRRLD MEDAL

'89 Austin Montego 2.0EFi Mayfair - BAGGY HEADCLOTH

'96 Toyota Carina E 1.6GS - DEPARTING
'00 Ford Mondeo 2.0i Zetec - NEW DAILY


#27 OFFLINE   colc

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 10:25 AM

Lonsdale.........doubt that any survive in the uk.........Lonsdale~YD41~(2).jpg


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You can tune a piano, but you can't tuna fish

#28 OFFLINE   Snipes

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 10:26 AM

3-door T12/72 Bluebird. The one SL let get away.

4439335070_e39e692e61.jpg
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#29 OFFLINE   sierraman

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 10:39 AM

As far as I’m aware no Lonsdale YD41’s survived.

#30 ONLINE   vaughant

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 10:40 AM

When wed the last time you saw a totally unmolested MK1 saxo vtr? They sold millions of those with the promise of free insurance and as an 18yr old lad with limited experience and 100 odd bhp things were never going to end well. Long before the days of the black box and massive emission restrictions, they were a really potent car in the right hands.
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