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Cycling South For Winter - Memories


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#61 ONLINE   The Moog

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 08:29 AM

Are we going to see the return of the Pants being used as outerwear? 


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#62 OFFLINE   cort1977

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 10:44 AM

I'm too far away to offer anything except wish you good luck.

 

Agree that a dynamo USB charging system will be a pain, they're not cheap and are the kind of thing that fails in serious rain.  Solar is not going to work well enough in the winter to be useful.  Do you even need lights beyond a emergency red blinky? you will have all day to ride after all.

 

Understand your point on rucksack but seriously, trying to ride any distance with a pack is a pain, let the bike do the work.  If the bike fails then that's the time to get a pack.  You can use one pannier as a bag to go in to shops and so on.


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#63 OFFLINE   Bucketeer

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 11:18 AM

^^^ I hope to not have to use the lights much, but I definitely want to have them.
I'm swaying on the rucksack. I'll need something else though, there won't be enough room just using panniers I reckon. I have a small daypack that I was given by a Finnish ex-girlfriend that might be enough. That could defo sit on top of the luggage rack.

Moog - Pants hat and sock gloves only come out at below -20C.
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#64 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 11:41 AM

I cycle into work daily for a few years and it's only a 10 mile round trip. I wear a backpack but only have a change of clothes and my lunch. However its truely buggered my back up. I'd hate to know what it's like wearing one after cycling constantly daily. I'm too cheap though to pay out for a panier and just put up with the pain.

Things that would be a very good idea to have imo:
  • Good quality multi-tool. This will get you out of trouble. Make sure that it has a chain breaker on it too. The other tools will probably be handy for daily life too.
  • Good quality hand pump. If you have a cheap one, you'll regret it the moment when you need to use it. Especially if you get a puncture in the most inconvenient of times. Pro-tip - line up the tyre logo with the inner tube valve stem. Makes it massively easier to find the puncture in an inner tube as you can compare the position with the hole in the tyre.
  • Good quality tyre levers. Park tool are excellent. Like the hand pump, you will regret buying the cheapest when they snap on you in the middle of nowhere. Aren't terribly expensive thing to buy.
  • Spares - spare chain and inner tubes are the most essential. If you're wanting to save money then a inner tube repair kit too. Still carry a spare inner, that way you can get on the road quickly again and then fix the old inner when you get a downtime moment.
  • Gatorskin tyres. Not the cheapest but not terrifying expensive. Kevlar lined, so very puncher resistant (not infallible mind). I've had mine for over 4 years and they still survive when cycling over broken glass and the like. Getting a bit torn up now though.

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#65 OFFLINE   loserone

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 01:00 PM

If you feel the need to start carrying too much, I have a bob-style trailer you can have.

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#66 OFFLINE   Cavcraft

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 01:00 PM

You might want to look at a ‘camel pack’ rucksack in case you get stuck without enough water. They do take up space, but if you’re never far from clean water for a while you could always empty it.
"As for actually admitting to liking Corsas on a public forum: you're a bollock-brained, biscuit-eating, faux-northern, bastardy, bollocky, wank-brain"

#67 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 01:08 PM

Camelbacks are brilliant but the bladders are very expensive. Even for non branded ones. The cheapest are still expensive and leak. I also wouldn't want to use one that hasn't been cleaned for weeks. They go a bit manky.
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#68 OFFLINE   lesapandre

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 01:16 PM

Camelbacks are brilliant but the bladders are very expensive. Even for non branded ones. The cheapest are still expensive and leak. I also wouldn't want to use one that hasn't been cleaned for weeks. They go a bit manky.

Use babies Milton tablets in the bag and pipes.


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#69 OFFLINE   loserone

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 01:18 PM

Actually, I do also have a small camelback copy. PM me an address and it's yours
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405 with no head, Leaf, 206 GTI with a knackered axle, Legacy H6 Spec B.  Half a.. something. It's japanese and silver, but I don't remember it.
Moaty's cat's back, Zak.


#70 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 01:19 PM

Use babies Milton tablets in the bag and pipes.

Yeah that's what I do already. Need a good flush through to make it not taste like you're drinking a swimming pool though. Not sure it's something Bucketeer will easily be able to do while on the road though.
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#71 OFFLINE   ChinaTom

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 01:20 PM

I have a very large pannier bag with top and side compartments - proper touring job complete with the mounting frame. It is in a lock-up on a Cambridgeshire airfield at the moment and I won’t be back to UK for a fortnight. Totally surplus to requirements as the bike was nicked and I’m not getting a replacement.

If you can make use of it, and can wait till I get to UK, happy to deliver it.

If not required, or doubtful, get some cash for it. Anyway, it’s a donation and will just clutter up the shipping container that contains the remnants of all my past lives, none of which included me as a touring cyclist!

And put up a funding site. I expect there are a few of us here that will quite happily keep you going if only to live out an adventure that they themselves may fancy doing but are too lazy / old / chickenshit / otherwise unable to have.

If there is one thing I have learned in life it is this. When things are not as you want / hoped / deserved, then travel. Go somewhere / anywhere else. This is not an option for many. But if it is an option, take it. Somewhere warm and sunny. You could end up doing volunteer work with like minded individuals, you could end up installing micro grid infrastructure in remote parts of Indonesia, planting trees in central Laos, getting bar work on a beach in Philippines, teaching drywall techniques in Bolivia... it doesn’t have to be all Bear Grills, but the sense of perspective it can provide is good and helpful.

My specific specialty in life has taken me to very remote corners of the planet, and I have met a lot of people on my travels that traded a poor situation in an affluent society for the risks and unknowns of making themselves useful in less developed areas. Most have the same back-story. Set out with no plans, but ended up enriched (rarely financially, but that isn’t the point) by alternative types of existence.

My specific speciality in life resulted from a ‘fuck this, I am out of here’ moment. My life could have turned out very poorly indeed had I not spent my last few quid on a very very budget flight to China in 1998.

All the very best to you.


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#72 OFFLINE   Wingz123

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 01:56 PM

Great words ChinaTom

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#73 OFFLINE   chadders

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 02:10 PM

Sorry it's not much but I've got a couple of reusable "Emergency Hooded Rain Ponchos" if they're of any use.

They're supposed to be 50-52 x 80". I've never used them so can't vouch for how good they are.

 

If they're likely to be of any use I'll post them.



#74 OFFLINE   binhoker668

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Posted 23 October 2018 - 04:29 PM

Righty-ho, I have a solution for your baggage problems. 

 

Screenshot_2018-10-23 Vida Bike Luggage Trailer with Bag Orange and Black.png

 

It's pretty much exactly the same as this, but in a used condition.

All works perfectly, but maybe some fettling involving the use of plastic washers would be the thing to do - it can creak a wee bit in use.

Although the last time I used it (a few months ago) I was hauling 2 crates of beer and several bottles of gin/mixers.

It has the fluorescent bag shown, but also a red and black one (which I prefer).  all zips/clamps/fittings etc work, although the bit that actually attaches to your rear axle requires some swearing occasionally. Or indeed, better mechanicking than I managed in my rush to go and get drunk in a field.

It's grand and it's yours.

Problem though.

I am in Notts and very busy at the mo.  I 'might' be in Leamington Spa at the weekend, but not sure how that would help, unless another shiter could do another relay from there?

Talk to me - am sure something could be done...

Chris

 


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#75 OFFLINE   loserone

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Posted 23 October 2018 - 04:55 PM

I've offered one of those, but it's not exactly lightweight is it! :)
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Moaty's cat's back, Zak.


#76 OFFLINE   binhoker668

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Posted 23 October 2018 - 05:19 PM

I've offered one of those, but it's not exactly lightweight is it! :)

 

Ah - didn't see that... Soz!


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#77 OFFLINE   catsinthewelder

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Posted 23 October 2018 - 05:42 PM

If you need some work for a few weeks before you go give me a shout.  I'm short of removal men as someone is ill.


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#78 ONLINE   richardmorris

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Posted 27 October 2018 - 02:37 PM

Any update on the bike collection And transport from Chester to the field of dreams?
I am happy to bring it down t’field on Tuesday the 6th if cavcraft industries ltd can get it to Wrexham this week.
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#79 OFFLINE   chaseracer

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Posted 27 October 2018 - 03:42 PM

All sorted.  Alex dropped Chris6C at Cannock, then headed off to do the deal at Cavcraft ("WE SAY YES!! NO? MAYBE...")


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#80 OFFLINE   Cavcraft

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Posted 27 October 2018 - 03:48 PM

Yep, all sorted. Mr A. C'teer departed earlier today then left to go back to Cannock. Thanks though, Richard.


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#81 OFFLINE   purplebargeken

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Posted 27 October 2018 - 03:53 PM

I've got a couple of gel saddles doing nowt. 

 

Another yes on the gatorskin tyres. 

 

What about a set of front wheel panniers too? I don't have any sadly but they might be another consideration. 

 

Don't forget some decent gloves. 


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#82 OFFLINE   DodgeRover

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Posted 28 October 2018 - 09:53 AM

You might want to look at a ‘camel pack’ rucksack in case you get stuck without enough water. They do take up space, but if you’re never far from clean water for a while you could always empty it.


While we are on water then one of the sawyer life straws (or similar filter) would guarantee safe drinkable water from any source. Cheaper and probably safer than unknown bottled water.

#83 OFFLINE   Bucketeer

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 09:20 PM

Thanks again everybody for the advice, opinions and offers of kit and help. I'm trying to message everyone but megasoz if I forget anyone.
The bike is now with me, and a brief punt around on it this morning was grand. I'll defo give it a more thorough workout soon to get to know it (and any foibles) better. Cavcraft also dug a bike trailer out of his garage for me. It was something I hadn't considered until a couple were offered earlier in the thread. Even then, I didn't think it was something I would want/need/use, but upon reflection (and seeing it in the flesh) I reckon it could be very handy. I'll get some pictures when it's not dark but the capacity of this one is right impressive. It'll mean I certainly won't need to ride with a pack on my back and I think that the extra bit of rolling resistance I'll get from the trailer will be more than offset by the reduction in weight the bike itself has to carry. It should help longevity and reliability if the bike isn't loaded up with the weight of everything I'm taking, like Buckeroo or summat. I still want to travel relatively light but some stuff in rear panniers and the rest in the trailer should see me right. Even if I just use the trailer for carrying extra bonus cold weather stuff, it should be a boon. I could put an actual real life duvet in it to go with a couple of sleeping bags to ensure I don't freeze to death too much every night.
Someone mentioned calorie intake, which was a good point. I hadn't really thought about it from the point of view of keeping warm, just for energy for keeping the body moving. On my previous walking travels I lived off cake for a large percentage of the time, which worked alright. And was cheap. And who doesn't want to eat cake every day. I'll probably do the same again this time, a nice heavy fruit cake every day will defo help fuel my inner boiler.

SiC has some good advice. I'd certainly never thought about taking a spare chain, which could be a very good idea. I probably won't end up taking one due to weight and cost, and may regret it, but I'm the optimistic type that generally believes nowt much will go wrong, and if it does I'll manage. Would chain lubrication type stuff be good to take though? What are the kids using nowadays? Grease? Oil? Trex?

Drinking water is always an issue for me. I'm a big lump and take a lot of hydrating, plus my body is used to getting a large daily intake of the stuff as I've never liked pop or owt and have drunk gallons of water every day since I was little. I took a bladder pack with me last time but had to bin it after I got very ill from drinking too much Danube water. The internet said it would be safe to drink but after a week or so of walking alongside the river and supping from it, I was laid up in my tent for 5 days, vomming like a trooper. Of course I was in the middle of nowhere, was too weak to keep walking, and needed to keep rehydrating. The only water around was the river, so I had to keep replacing the water that made me ill with water that made me ill. Fun times. Anyway, Milton tablets is a good shout, thanks for that. I'll take something like that this time for sure.

Stanky has kindly offered to set up a Fundgrazer thingy for me, but I'd prefer to hold off on that for now and spend all my money I've cobbled together before thinking about accepting anyone elses.

I'll maybe post a kit list up soon. It'll help me work out what I've got and what I still need. I'm struggling to get my head round it at the moment and if I don't get a bit more organised I'm likely just to set off with three pairs of summer shorts, a kite, and a cheese grater.
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#84 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 09:27 PM

If you don't want to carry a spare chain, at least bring a couple of quick links (like £4 for 3 posted - KMC/SRAM/etc make sure you get the right size e.g. 7/8/9/10/11spd) and a chain breaker (again a couple of quid)
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Moderns: 2008 Audi TT - Utterly boring but very compentent, 2010 Aldi A4 - Owned to placate the wife on my crap buying.

#85 ONLINE   richardmorris

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 09:28 PM

I’d recommend a small multi tool thing like this

https://www.decathlo...id_8385878.html

And I usually use mucoff wetlube for the chain.
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#86 OFFLINE   forddeliveryboy

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 09:37 PM

Would chain lubrication type stuff be good to take though? What are the kids using nowadays? Grease? Oil? Trex?


I melt old candle ends and mix with 25-35% atf and dip the chain in, it makes a good dry lube.

#87 OFFLINE   djoptix

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 09:47 PM

Better pack old candles, ATF, a stove, a big pan and a smaller ceramic bowl then :)


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Shit you are brave taking one of these on, they really are hopeless.


#88 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 10:14 PM

If you have a fresh, new chain then that come pre lubed. So don't try cleaning the coating off. Lube later with dry/wet chain lube. I think you might have missed most of the cheap decent stuff they were doing in Lidl the other week.
Oldies: 1972 Austin 1100 2dr - Project Rust bucket, 1974 MGB GT - A stereotypical classic car.
Moderns: 2008 Audi TT - Utterly boring but very compentent, 2010 Aldi A4 - Owned to placate the wife on my crap buying.

#89 OFFLINE   forddeliveryboy

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 11:08 PM

Better pack old candles, ATF, a stove, a big pan and a smaller ceramic bowl then :)


If money's in short supply you soon grow inventive. I'm imagining there'll be a used ally foil tray/bowl around every now and then, a stove to hand and most restaurants will have plenty of old candles. Would think wvo would work fine as a substitute for atf. Candles on their own work too.

Equally wvo would probably be ok on its own, just a bit sticky and dust-attracting. Anything sourced locally saves carrying a bottle of expensive whatever up every hill from England to Africa.

#90 OFFLINE   Luxxo Waftybarger

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Posted 29 October 2018 - 11:41 PM

I cycle 5 miles to work each day and do a fair bit of longer distance road stuff, a few sportives up to 100 miles.

Your absolute priority needs to be contact points with the bike, i.e where your arse hands and feet are taking a pummeling. The mechanical stuff is mostly a piece of piss and you can deal with it on your way but if you are in pain it will be shit and you'll rather be on a bus.

Get a few pairs of decent padded bib shorts, they will be the difference between getting off after 10 miles and keeping going for another 50. Also decent cycling shoes, socks and overshoes. In bad weather your feet will get so cold you will have to stop. At a push carrier bags and rubber bands will do to keep rain off. For clothes you need something waterproof, you'll sweat but a bin bag is better than nothing if you go slow.

For gloves a full finger padded and fingerless pair for hotter climes will save your ulnar nerve from packing in (numb hand extends up your wrist can do permanent nerve damage).

Once the clothing situation is sorted then the other things to focus on:

Gear ratios and tyres. Basically just get the biggest cassette you can fit probably a 32, otherwise you will struggle uphill and will probably find knee pain makes you miserable. Really cannot understate it, the rest of the bike can be tour de france standard but with the wrong gears you'll go nowhere.

Try to get a decent set of slick road tyres, expensive but will see you going so much faster and less likely to skid. Like cars they transform even a crap bike. Nobblies have no place on a road bike so ditch them. Continental GPS2 or 4seasons (not the posh hotel) if you can stretch to it.

Also shades, including some clear safety specs for riding in low light or the bugs will send you blind.

Chain tool and quick links a good idea or you'll have some long walks!

The above are all essentials and you shouldn't really leave without sorting all of the above because frankly you'll have a shit time! I know from trying to cycle to Barcelona from St Buryan on a hybrid in a pair of jeans.

Not essential but tri bars will give you an alternative grip to ease pain in hands etc and save loads of watts in aerodynamic efficiency you can get them cheap on eBay. LeJog weirdos use them so there must be something in it.

Also look up bike fit on YouTube try to get saddle and bar height right or you will injure your knees eventually and that in my experience puts and end to it since they just don't heal until you stop cycling for a few months. Most people have their saddle too low and that wrecks the front of the knee. Start high and go downward, being too high can hurt your hamstring but that'll ease much quicker.

Very jealous have fun.
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