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The Austin 2dr 1100 story - Part IV

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#301 OFFLINE   anonymous user

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 05:36 PM

Bucket of wob?


No an 1100 sized block of filler and a set of sculptor's tools

#302 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 09:14 PM

One front 1100 wiring loom. Not as long as I expected really.
f9c059a98b42e2730a452d685c3b6993.jpg

A few bits are going to need TLC if I do reuse it.
8d20e73e845e50df29daaa193561183c.jpg

Pretty sure I'll just remake it one rainy evening to be honest.
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Oldies: 1972 Austin 1100 2dr - Project Rust bucket, 1974 MGB GT - A stereotypical classic car.
Moderns: 2008 Audi TT - Utterly boring but very compentent, 2010 Aldi A4 - Owned to placate the wife on my crap buying.

#303 OFFLINE   Hooli

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 09:16 PM

No an 1100 sized block of filler and a set of sculptor's tools

 

It'd still rust.


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Opinions expressed are those of this cunt, not any other cunt. They do not represent the views of those responsible for this forum.
Like any true Englishman I'm never unintentionally rude. If you're offended by this post, good as that is what was intended.

 


#304 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 09:57 PM

Here is one for the ado16 experts. This is the rear subframe, rear mount.

Nearside:
38fedcb286e59c55e6534911f14f92b2.jpg

Offside:
607356360b8b0b61798dd6d16d612668.jpg

Brackets seem very different, especially in height. Is this right? The offside does look like it's original and the nearside looks a later addition. The nearside welds (almost looks tacked on) also came away when I pulled it with my fingers. So will definitely need some work back there. Also the bolts are loose on it too.
Oldies: 1972 Austin 1100 2dr - Project Rust bucket, 1974 MGB GT - A stereotypical classic car.
Moderns: 2008 Audi TT - Utterly boring but very compentent, 2010 Aldi A4 - Owned to placate the wife on my crap buying.

#305 OFFLINE   Mally

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 07:55 AM

Bolts loose is good.

Save you having to shear them when removing :)

Offside brk looks good.

Nearside needs better bodging.

Can't remember how it's supposed to look, hopefully a photo may emerge.



#306 OFFLINE   vulgalour

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 12:25 PM

What's the burnt wire on the loom?  We fixed what problems we knew about, but I can't figure out which that one's for.

 

on those rear brackets, I didn't actually touch either of them so that bolt must have been loose for quite some time.  The nearside I did have to replace the boot floor above and thought I'd welded to the bracket well enough, perhaps I didn't.  The plan was to get the rear subframe off and deal with any awkward bits at which point I would have caught problem areas, I just never got that far.



#307 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 12:47 PM

What's the burnt wire on the loom? We fixed what problems we knew about, but I can't figure out which that one's for.


Its quite a thick cable and the according to the colour coding that blue+white feed is main beam feed. Purple is fused permanent live for horn and flash. Not sure if its burnt or if just rubbed through. I'll check with a DMM if that is copper showing through.
 

on those rear brackets, I didn't actually touch either of them so that bolt must have been loose for quite some time. The nearside I did have to replace the boot floor above and thought I'd welded to the bracket well enough, perhaps I didn't. The plan was to get the rear subframe off and deal with any awkward bits at which point I would have caught problem areas, I just never got that far.

Nah don't worry about feeling guilty or anything. I'm more in observational mode at the moment, tracking things that I need to check/work/rework. I wasn't sure if the bracket there is the correct height or not. If its not, is it ok or do I need to fabricate a new bracket to match what it should be?

I'll be able to get a better look under there once I've got the tank off. A little bit nervous going under there, as I hope the subframe mountings are still strong enough and not likely to fall on me...
I suspect (iirc Mike said too) that the rear subframe, front mountings may need a bit of work - especially on the offside.
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Oldies: 1972 Austin 1100 2dr - Project Rust bucket, 1974 MGB GT - A stereotypical classic car.
Moderns: 2008 Audi TT - Utterly boring but very compentent, 2010 Aldi A4 - Owned to placate the wife on my crap buying.

#308 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 01:10 PM

Bought a new boot seal off eBay. A little bit annoyed about it. A single listing, showing for a single item. I kept leaving it and leaving it. But as it was NOS and slightly cheaper (couple of quid) than a new repro part, I didn't want to miss out. Especially as it was the only one. So even though itsow priority on the buy list, I bought it. The seller then relisted again for another one he had.

Oh well. Got it now. Here it is in all its glory. Just under 15quid posted isn't too bad I guess. Certainly not worth storing away and banking your retirement on.
a08293ebc18338fd1a4c92adc67a2a59.jpg

Another quality* British product made to BL standards.
c1c59477555f1bcd5eb9ff762bdcfd9d.jpg
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Oldies: 1972 Austin 1100 2dr - Project Rust bucket, 1974 MGB GT - A stereotypical classic car.
Moderns: 2008 Audi TT - Utterly boring but very compentent, 2010 Aldi A4 - Owned to placate the wife on my crap buying.

#309 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 09:24 PM

More stuff happened tonight.

Really not much to report about taking the tank out.
66501ac8e017a6dcf189e3f0ecdb631f.jpg

8 bolts - all reasonably easy to remove curtosy of my impact driver. That tool is really not designed for driving sockets (I think) but it does a great job of doing so. Only 110Nm max and so less likely to snap the bolts off compared to an impact wrench. The impact function helps loosen stuff too.

I hoped to remove the short fuel pipe that goes from the tank to a Flexi but the fitting on the tank is pretty much stuck solid. The pipe is very crusty and I think will have to be replaced. I'll probably cut the pipe right down and I can then get a decent impact socket on there and some force on it.

Anyway those bolts, cut pipe and undo sender wire. Tank out.
cda7a0c44ca26904bc0e19012db99d4b.jpg

Actually in extremely good condition. The brown you see is actually dirt, not rust. I think a good clean down and a paint will bring it right back up. I was very worried that I might have to get it professionally refurbished, however I think it's in by far good enough condition to not need it. Top is in great condition, worst bit is the bottom. However Vulg put fuel in it, so the bottom must not be leaking.

Even looking inside through the filler it looks reasonable.
5ab87b601eebbfad4e96d21691c029f7.jpg

Now thanks to a certain MP, upskirting isn't illegal yet. So I can show you the state of the boot above the tank.

0cfc6075607ce50256ad5ca20eb921a6.jpg15ba51fed77e1d5196314eaab3d94c07.jpg
500f222b7b13027536eefc6dd02581f1.jpg
c829711b6363cbaeb85806fd6f4c8a0c.jpg

No rust!!

Nothing around the front of the tank either. Subframe itself has some surface rust but it does seem solid. I'm really going to have to remove it at some point for a proper paint to protect it.

3f62793b5a1c661ade0e9626edc8fe37.jpg

Nearside hydrolastic pipe was pinched between the subframe and boot floor. I pulled this free. Luckily it doesn't seem permanently damaged. Hydro pipes are aged but currently seem usable. Another thing less to worry about thankfully.

93aff14a890a553072dbba0d48bcbfc3.jpg
bb34363a4a516d08c3be8638ffc1db9d.jpg

Now time to show you some ugly bits.

Nearside rear subframe, front mount appears strong from what I can see. Messy but solid from my non expert eye.

f4b49c57ac591be89293748ce7726d2c.jpg
15c56adacbf66104f2c8a379398e001c.jpg
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Lets have a look at a proper bad bit. Front offside mount this time.
f7215b8bbfa877c8b60cf53fb208dc30.jpg

Looking in that hole.
22c0b6752cc8335bce458f984a0083b2.jpg

At the mount location itself (slightly to the right of the hole). These two bits have split apart. Going to need cleaning back and finding how much good steel is left.
845d1bf0d61c1f5576fd1c3a03a8e752.jpg

We can't end on that mess, so let's look down towards the front of the car.

cb9a42ee9de8e482b5e7799ca0bbfb09.jpg

Lack of daylight made for a bad photo, so I bumped up the brightness and over saturated it to try and make it clearer. Looking down here perked me up a lot. Maybe not totally clear from that photo, but apart from the sills, drivers floor, driver floor subframe mount, 2 rear subframe mounts and wheel arches there isn't much more structurally concerning rust. Cosmetically there is the offside rear wheel arch, bottom of both back wings, that new dashboard hole and the front bulkhead that needs patching up.

Sounds a lot but most of it seems like it can be patched perfectly fine. I was considering removing the entire floor on each side, but it looks in great condition generally.

This week's list is slowly getting there now. The big two jobs are done now. Just fiddly small jobs.
93e3870f2d42254d527d343b9078b47b.jpg

Then to start the big weldathon.
  • richardthestag, danthecapriman, Skizzer and 7 others like this
Oldies: 1972 Austin 1100 2dr - Project Rust bucket, 1974 MGB GT - A stereotypical classic car.
Moderns: 2008 Audi TT - Utterly boring but very compentent, 2010 Aldi A4 - Owned to placate the wife on my crap buying.

#310 OFFLINE   Squire_Dawson

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 09:38 PM

I would just use insulation tape on the damaged insulation. The actual wire doesn't look damaged.


Squeak, rattle and roll.

 

 

Thanks restorer.

 

Save the Pangolins.

 

Current shite:

1952 Morris Oxford Series MO - Sidevalve Shite

1959 Humber Super Snipe - Big banger

1962 Morris 1000 Traveller - English Tudorbethan

1975 Austin Allegro 1100 DL - m'Lod

 

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#311 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 10:58 PM

Hard to tell if strand of insulation have been exposed to be honest. If I'm reusing the loom, I'd cut it into two and resolder or cut off the insulation and heatshrink.

I have pondered about reusing the loom but cutting off all the knackered, corroded crimps and crimping fresh ones on. The dash end could all be chopped back and a multiway block attached to it. Then the dash itself has a mini loom. Thus if the dash ever needs to come off, it's substantially easier job.

The only thing that puts me off on that plan is often I've found once you start cutting off the connectors, it requires a fair amount of cleaning of the wire until it becomes acceptable. New wire isn't even that expensive if I did make a new loom either. Especially if I only buy what I need in roughly the correct meter lengths. I reckon one could be remade for under 100quid. It's really not a very complicated car electrically.

What it would give remaking it, is complete confidence and reliability in the electrical systems of the car. Which is no bad thing.
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Oldies: 1972 Austin 1100 2dr - Project Rust bucket, 1974 MGB GT - A stereotypical classic car.
Moderns: 2008 Audi TT - Utterly boring but very compentent, 2010 Aldi A4 - Owned to placate the wife on my crap buying.

#312 OFFLINE   The Reverend Bluejeans

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 08:37 AM

You're doing the right thing by stripping it. Roll it on its side for there welding through - that's how I did various Minis and the job is 8000000 times easier. You might want to consider having the shell soda blasted as well. Or sandblasted - entire floor both side and engine bay/inner wings. Again, it was 200 quid well spent when I did mine.


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#313 OFFLINE   purplebargeken

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 08:45 AM

I think that you are quite right in renewing the loom completely, especially if well within your comfort zone capability-wise. You will know exactly what is what, clean, fresh wires, no fatigue, no shitty earth connections, no puzzled scrabbling around at 1am trying to find out why you only have an interior light working on the entire car. Priceless.


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#314 OFFLINE   catsinthewelder

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 09:41 AM

+1 for remaking the loom. I've had 2 electrical fires while driving it!

Ugly but solid welding by the rear subframe was done from above so I didn't need to remove subframe. Good to see there weren't any horrors lurking behind the tank.
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#315 OFFLINE   richardthestag

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 10:29 AM

top work. like the Beegeetea I have a feeling I am going to enjoy this one.

 

check out these chaps

 

http://www.wrightsautosupplies.co.uk/

 

get a bucket of UNF and UNC nuts and bolts. avoid stainless for anything that might stress and just cut off the rusty fixings.

 

stripping right down is time consuming but very satisfying, well for me. terrifies most folk that I talk to.

 

Keep the end point in focus.

 

save images of key success points and refer to those in down moments. You will need them

 

when it gets on top of you, walk away and return after a mug of tea, pint of beer, 15 sleeps / whatever it takes to get the mojo back.

 

buy a big old tarp and some rope to cover it up and then you dont need to worry about doors, bonnet, boot, screen etc etc and protecting it from the elements. a 3 x 3m pop up gazebo can be useful also

 

where did you get the power pack from? looks v useful


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#316 OFFLINE   richardthestag

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 10:30 AM

oh and get a decent unf / unc tap and die set. I find them invaluable 

 

As is a drill gage in imperial size and a decent thread / pitch gauge


Shitroen C4 GP 2007 1.6HDi - Wife's daily written off, farewell trusty but slightly unpredictable steed

Pug 307 - son's daily runner Sold to Arthur Foxhake

Range Rover Vogue 1993 - my daily runner

Daewoo Matiz 2002 - Sold

Jaguar x308 Sovereign 4 litre - sold to Hooli

Triumph Staaag 1973 - cheaper than a mistress.. just

Range Rover 1972 - ongoing extensive restoration

Range Rover 1972 - complete shed but in line for restoration

Land Rover 1969 SIIa SWB - belongs to Fathathestag but maintained and welded by me

BMW E46 318i touring - sold to hhhugues

VW Polo 2002 1.2l 3 pot bargain for #2 son

 


#317 OFFLINE   Hooli

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 12:23 PM

I think you should retap or helicoil everything to metric just to piss off the next owner when you sell it...


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Opinions expressed are those of this cunt, not any other cunt. They do not represent the views of those responsible for this forum.
Like any true Englishman I'm never unintentionally rude. If you're offended by this post, good as that is what was intended.

 


#318 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 12:27 PM

I think you should retap or helicoil everything to metric force metric bolts into every fitting just to piss off the next owner when you sell it...


FTFY
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Oldies: 1972 Austin 1100 2dr - Project Rust bucket, 1974 MGB GT - A stereotypical classic car.
Moderns: 2008 Audi TT - Utterly boring but very compentent, 2010 Aldi A4 - Owned to placate the wife on my crap buying.

#319 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 12:30 PM

At the moment I've been putting bolts back into the fixings they came from. Will hopefully mean I won't forget what came from where!

So far, I haven't actually found any bolts that are rusted/seized stuck. Either they're quality British* fasteners, stuff has been removed often or its in pretty good condition.
Oldies: 1972 Austin 1100 2dr - Project Rust bucket, 1974 MGB GT - A stereotypical classic car.
Moderns: 2008 Audi TT - Utterly boring but very compentent, 2010 Aldi A4 - Owned to placate the wife on my crap buying.

#320 OFFLINE   captain_70s

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 12:37 PM

At the moment I've been putting bolts back into the fixings they came from. Will hopefully mean I won't forget what came from where!

So far, I haven't actually found any bolts that are rusted/seized stuck. Either they're quality British* fasteners, stuff has been removed often or its in pretty good condition.

That is my methodology for keeping track of nuts/bolts as well...

 

I reckon the reason my Doloshite's fittings are so much easier to remove than the Civic's is that the Triumph needs dismantling several times a year to actually get it to work while the Honda's bolts have probably been in situ for a decade...


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#321 OFFLINE   Squire_Dawson

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 01:45 PM

Might've been mentioned before, but if making a loom yourself proves troublesome, Autosparks seem to be the go-to men for period wiring looms. They re-make them in the correct braided or plastic cable according to the type/age of car, and look great.


Squeak, rattle and roll.

 

 

Thanks restorer.

 

Save the Pangolins.

 

Current shite:

1952 Morris Oxford Series MO - Sidevalve Shite

1959 Humber Super Snipe - Big banger

1962 Morris 1000 Traveller - English Tudorbethan

1975 Austin Allegro 1100 DL - m'Lod

 

Please look out for hedgehogs!


#322 OFFLINE   vulgalour

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 01:56 PM

One of the joys with this little car was how easily everything came undone (and went back together).  I've never known another car like it.



#323 OFFLINE   danthecapriman

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 03:17 PM

You're doing the right thing by stripping it. Roll it on its side for there welding through - that's how I did various Minis and the job is 8000000 times easier. You might want to consider having the shell soda blasted as well. Or sandblasted - entire floor both side and engine bay/inner wings. Again, it was 200 quid well spent when I did mine.


This. But I will say, be careful if you do get it blasted. I had the Capri done and they didn’t do it very sympathetically as the process can create a fair bit of heat which doesn’t do well for large panels. The heat build up actually warped parts of my roof and bonnet. Luckily it wasn’t a serious issue and was fixed but having to fix that cost extra time and money to put right.
Blasting does make absolutely sure you find everything wrong with the car though. It’s well worth considering as when mine was done it revealed much more rot than I knew about. If I didn’t do that there was the possibility of restoring the car and spending good money on paint etc but missing some of the rot only for it to come back through later. Do it right and do it once.

Great job so far though!
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#324 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 06:00 PM

I totally understand what you mean by cleaning the shell down completely. However this will never be a concourse show winner. Well it could, but that would require cutting large parts of the body off and replacing them. Body panels aren't cheap for these and not all pieces are around, so a lot of fabrication. Then a full body respray which around here is at least £2k. Finally all the other small ancillaries and parts add up. By the time I've done all that, I would have spent more than just buying an immaculate one anyway. But I wouldn't want to drive it and mess it all up.

So my plan is to fix it up the body so it's safe and solid. Paint work wise it's very likely going to be machine sanded down and then rollered with enamal or similar by my wife. It won't be immaculate, infact it may only be a 10 footer. However this means I can enjoy it as it is. Buzz it around the city and on back roads. If someone dings the doors, keys it or drives into the side of it then I'll just be annoyed.

Plus a full restoration to bring it to out of/better than factory condition will take too long. I'll be bored long before then and want a new project. :D
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Oldies: 1972 Austin 1100 2dr - Project Rust bucket, 1974 MGB GT - A stereotypical classic car.
Moderns: 2008 Audi TT - Utterly boring but very compentent, 2010 Aldi A4 - Owned to placate the wife on my crap buying.

#325 OFFLINE   RayMK

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 07:23 PM

Concours cars are pretty things but you've summed up your philosophy nicely.  An 1100 brought back from the brink so that it can be driven and enjoyed is every bit as satisfying.



#326 OFFLINE   JeeExEll

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 07:35 PM

At the moment I've been putting bolts back into the fixings they came from. Will hopefully mean I won't forget what came from where!

Or make one / several of these.

lsBQpKM.jpg
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#327 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 07:36 PM

That's a bloody good idea! Problem is, I'd either loose the cardboard sheet or the cat knocks it over and all the fasteners fall out.
  • Christine likes this
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Moderns: 2008 Audi TT - Utterly boring but very compentent, 2010 Aldi A4 - Owned to placate the wife on my crap buying.

#328 OFFLINE   JeeExEll

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 07:39 PM

Aye, I was going to add that.
There is a risk of it being accidentally knocked or disturbed. Or blown away.
Handy if working inside and you have a safe space tho.

#329 OFFLINE   Noel Tidybeard

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Posted 14 July 2018 - 05:06 PM

That's a bloody good idea! Problem is, I'd either loose the cardboard sheet or the cat knocks it over and all the fasteners fall out.

 

 

Aye, I was going to add that.
There is a risk of it being accidentally knocked or disturbed. Or blown away.
Handy if working inside and you have a safe space tho.

 

so put a knotted piece of string/wire through 2 holes at the top an hang it like art on the wall!


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#330 OFFLINE   The Reverend Bluejeans

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Posted 14 July 2018 - 05:24 PM

I totally understand what you mean by cleaning the shell down completely. However this will never be a concourse show winner. Well it could, but that would require cutting large parts of the body off and replacing them. Body panels aren't cheap for these and not all pieces are around, so a lot of fabrication. Then a full body respray which around here is at least £2k. Finally all the other small ancillaries and parts add up. By the time I've done all that, I would have spent more than just buying an immaculate one anyway. But I wouldn't want to drive it and mess it all up.

So my plan is to fix it up the body so it's safe and solid. Paint work wise it's very likely going to be machine sanded down and then rollered with enamal or similar by my wife. It won't be immaculate, infact it may only be a 10 footer. However this means I can enjoy it as it is. Buzz it around the city and on back roads. If someone dings the doors, keys it or drives into the side of it then I'll just be annoyed.

Plus a full restoration to bring it to out of/better than factory condition will take too long. I'll be bored long before then and want a new project. :D

 

 

 

It would be easier to paint it properly. Get that purple shit off with a DA sander, a coat of isolator, some high build primer and a few double coats of cellulose. Rent a compressor, buy a decent budget spray gun etc.

 

Bollocks to concours but I'd think twice about a roller paint job.


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