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The Austin 2dr 1100 story - Part IV - Welding

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793 replies to this topic

#781 OFFLINE   Dick Longbridge

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Posted 21 October 2018 - 07:24 PM

I'm getting a bit fed up of the welding now. Actually the welding is ok, it's the grinding. My god do I hate grinding. Hate hate hate. I imagine my neighbours hate it too.


You can’t make an omelette without cracking some eggs. Buy the neighbours some chocklits at Christmas and offer them a free ride in a rare car when it’s finished. Should placate them. Maybe.
Great work, anyhow. You clearly aren’t afraid of cracking on with it!
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#782 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted 21 October 2018 - 09:10 PM

Thanks for all the kind words everyone. They definitely help the ol' motivation - especially on projects like this.

Got the top of the sill mostly welded in. Completely forgot that you're supposed to check the shut line! Bugger. Oh well, I'm too far in welding this now to go back. Hopefully should be alright as I'm going against the old sill top. Anyway it's 1970s British Leyland. If the shut line was too good, then it wouldn't look original. Right? (I'm sticking to that excuse ;) )

I was hoping to puddle weld and put a bead across. Unfortunately the metal underneath is too bent to puddle weld. The bead is quite messy. My excuse is that I was welding by torch light again!
d06d902860adde6813808885187aea17.jpg

My puddle welds.
c3247ed6fa1f7d4799274c290b0354ec.jpg

This bit looks even more messy as I had to chase some of the holes that blew through. Not sure if thin steel because old or because I was a bit too vigorous on the flap wheel again.
895c4b0bc39d0d5e9821800f0474e353.jpg

I'm definitely going to have to try grinding that back as it's especially noticeable area. Again, I'm not totally happy it's penetrated all the way through. I need to set the welder a bit higher power I think. Or I'm too quick with the torch.

Started drilling out the top plate. The bottom plate I can easily get to by cutting a hole in the pillar. The top isn't as easy.

Got all the way through with a 5mm bit. Wasn't quite enough to break it through. So went in with a 6mm bit (I broke my 5.5mm earlier).
a3245208f61cec9eb3e7ed46dc2337c0.jpg

Which broke as well. But this time it's well and truly stuck there.

Balls.
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Oldies: 1972 Austin 1100 2dr - Project Rust bucket, 1974 MGB GT - A stereotypical classic car.
Moderns: 2008 Audi TT - Utterly boring but very compentent, 2010 Aldi A4 - Owned to placate the wife on my crap buying.

#783 OFFLINE   vulgalour

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Posted 21 October 2018 - 09:29 PM

The welding can get a bit demoralising, pays to take a break from it now and then and to change tack if you can to do something less demanding.  The amount of welding you've got through on this is impressive and it's great to see updates on all that nice new steel going back in.  Don't forget, you've stablised the floor, rear arch and the sill now, that's a massive amount of work by anyone's estimation, and you're doing it outside on your drive which is certainly more challenging than a nice cosy workshop!



#784 OFFLINE   They_all_do_that_sir

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Posted Yesterday, 06:17 AM

I've never welded anything in my life, so watching all this is quite encouraging. Some day I'll have to give it a go though thankfully I've nothing that needs touched with the sparkle stick (touch wood)

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#785 OFFLINE   DodgeRover

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Posted Yesterday, 06:28 AM

I think those screw heads would have been much larger than PZ4, on the bonus side you could probably replace them with some countersunk Allen cap bolts,

#786 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted Yesterday, 06:58 AM



The welding can get a bit demoralising, pays to take a break from it now and then and to change tack if you can to do something less demanding. The amount of welding you've got through on this is impressive and it's great to see updates on all that nice new steel going back in. Don't forget, you've stablised the floor, rear arch and the sill now, that's a massive amount of work by anyone's estimation, and you're doing it outside on your drive which is certainly more challenging than a nice cosy workshop!


I've got the next couple of weekends to myself as Mrs SiC is off doing her own thing. If the weather is nice, I just need to power on and get it done. There isn't a lot else I can be getting on with just yet either. Need to order in a clutch puller tool so I can get on with the engine. There is the wiring too I have to start planning and buying the necessary lengths of wire. But that all can be done once it's colder, wetter and darker.

I've never welded anything in my life, so watching all this is quite encouraging. Some day I'll have to give it a go though thankfully I've nothing that needs touched with the sparkle stick (touch wood)

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One great thing about learning to weld is the chod possibilities that are opened up. Many people run scared of having to do any welding. So cars with even only a small amount of metal work needed for MOTs are sold cheap or thrown away.


I think those screw heads would have been much larger than PZ4, on the bonus side you could probably replace them with some countersunk Allen cap bolts,

It's a bit sacrilege but if I can, I'd like to use torx screws. They're unfairly hated but they are designed not to cam out or round off - unlike hex or Philips head screws. I was hoping the captive plate that the threads stripped on was something fairly BMC generic. However after having a look around, I can't find anything else that has the same plate.
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Oldies: 1972 Austin 1100 2dr - Project Rust bucket, 1974 MGB GT - A stereotypical classic car.
Moderns: 2008 Audi TT - Utterly boring but very compentent, 2010 Aldi A4 - Owned to placate the wife on my crap buying.

#787 OFFLINE   Mally

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Posted Yesterday, 07:37 AM



One great thing about learning to weld is the chod possibilities that are opened up. Many people run scared of having to do any welding. So cars with even only a small amount of metal work needed for MOTs are sold cheap or thrown away.


 

 

Welding holds no fear to you.

A massive achievement in such a short time.


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#788 OFFLINE   DodgeRover

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Posted Yesterday, 11:42 AM

That captive plate - if you can access the rear of it to weld then drill the holes to a clearance size and weld appropriate nuts to the rear of them, put the torqs screws in first to hold the nut in position.

Torqs is a good choice, they use them on modern stuff for a reason, as long as you have the correct bit you can get an amazing amount of pressure on them.

#789 OFFLINE   SiC

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Posted Yesterday, 12:02 PM

Not easy to get to the back. The wing is welded on, so I'd have to cut it off at the top. It could do with a new wing to be fair (it's pretty rotten), however they're quite expensive. Anyway they are still made, so I can always get one in the future.

The bottom plate is easy to get to and the inside panel on the a-pillar needs welding up anyway. However the top one less so as there is the dashboard support beam/brace going across. I don't really want to cut that off to get in there. Might see if I cut a hole at the bottom of the pillar on the inside and try tunneling upwards. I think the captive plates live in their own little box to stop them falling out. It's why I was trying to drill out the top plate to see if I could save it without removing it.
Oldies: 1972 Austin 1100 2dr - Project Rust bucket, 1974 MGB GT - A stereotypical classic car.
Moderns: 2008 Audi TT - Utterly boring but very compentent, 2010 Aldi A4 - Owned to placate the wife on my crap buying.

#790 OFFLINE   They_all_do_that_sir

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Posted Yesterday, 01:26 PM

Who needs doors anyway

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#791 ONLINE   Eddie Honda

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Posted Yesterday, 02:25 PM

Just make a new plate. Scrounge offcuts in the appropriate thickness and drill/tap new holes to your favourite thread.



#792 ONLINE   Noel Tidybeard

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Posted Yesterday, 05:58 PM

go gentle with a tungsten carbide bit?


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#793 OFFLINE   DodgeRover

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Posted Yesterday, 06:36 PM

You could probably just tap then to the next size up, I'm guessing you will be using metric torq bolts so you should be able to manage it ok.
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#794 OFFLINE   Arthur Foxhake

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Posted Yesterday, 07:25 PM

Hammer a Bini over it?





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