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Stanky's Celica - Cleaning the bottle thrody 11/11


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#31 OFFLINE   tobyd

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Posted 06 June 2018 - 09:12 PM

Best way.

 

Looks wicked.

 

What does ST trim bring to the party?

 

That Top-Gear CD is Absolute Radios playlist every single day...


'99 Skoda Octavia 1.6 'Petrol Blue' (green) £90

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#32 OFFLINE   Stanky

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Posted 06 June 2018 - 09:16 PM

ST stands for 'Skinflint Twat' and is the most lowly of this generation of Celicas. Still has lots of toys, but has the lowest powered engine out of the lot, and apparently least tunable due to weak conrods or so i understand.

 

Still has a decent 0-60 time (the fastest of the fleet on paper) but has less power in reserve than the Saab does at 70mph. It'd have it on a B-road though.

 

yeah, there are some alright songs on the CD but its mostly pap that they didn't have to pay royalties for in 1998, let alone now.


2003 Toyota Yaris

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1998 Toyota Celica ST

 

1996 Nissan Almera GX (departed)

198? Jago Geep (Now resideing chez red5)

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Yeah yeah, another blog. Why I use silly hardware to mine cryptocurrency: https://piminer.home.blog/


#33 ONLINE   mitsisigma01

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Posted 06 June 2018 - 09:26 PM

Bring back the radio cassette for absolute shiteness ! Cd's they'll never catch on !
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#34 OFFLINE   holbeck

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Posted 07 June 2018 - 05:53 AM

 

How recent is the rusty bleb on the driver side sill? I'll probably wire brush it, then whack some rust converter and primer on it this weekend and get a rattle can of toyota red to go over it with. Does anyone know if this gloop that toolstation sell actually works?

 

 

The rust bleb is the same one that can be seen in red5's for sale photo's?  

 

http://autoshite.com...h/#entry1481979

 

 



#35 OFFLINE   Talbot

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Posted 07 June 2018 - 06:49 AM

TL;DR - fat bald man travels short distance to buy reliable car


Thread delivers as promised! A very Sillycar indeed. Looks amazingly clean for a 20-year-old car. The red is still very shiny.

Also;

Y Tho?
Ytho.PNG
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Current fleet:  Mercedes.  Xantia.  Berlingo.  Discovery.  Forward Control.  Nova. Historic shite.

#36 OFFLINE   Stanky

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Posted 07 June 2018 - 10:46 AM

The rust bleb is the same one that can be seen in red5's for sale photo's?  

 

http://autoshite.com...h/#entry1481979

 

I've found out the paint code so I'll get some rust converter and then prime, paint and lacquer it, its really odd - odd location and only surface rust by the looks of it. Still, its something to fix! Drove into work today and its a lot of fun to drive down a good road!


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2003 Toyota Yaris

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1998 Toyota Celica ST

 

1996 Nissan Almera GX (departed)

198? Jago Geep (Now resideing chez red5)

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Yeah yeah, another blog. Why I use silly hardware to mine cryptocurrency: https://piminer.home.blog/


#37 OFFLINE   Stanky

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 04:14 PM

So, ignoring the doctors instructions I set to changing the gearbox oil in the Celica this afternoon. It was that or have a serious look at the rust bleb but since the weather looked a bit peaky I opted for the gearbox oil instead.

 

red5 reckoned it was well overdue so I spent an amazon voucher on 3x litre bottles of Comma GL4 75w/90 gear oil which showed up last weekend. Looking up how to do it, it seemed relatively easy, jack car up, undo undertray, undo filler plug, undo drain plug, then reverse instructions.

 

So, first up, I needed some access at the top to undo the fill plug. Its very important to do this first, because if this is stuck fast and you've already drained the old oil out you are buggered.

 

DSC_0024.JPG

 

Battery out

 

DSC_0025.JPG

 

This is the fill plug, its a 24mm hex bolt. with the battery out there is enough room to get a long 1/2" bar on it and with a heave it came undone. its a bit rusty but was less seized than the fill plug was on the Almera gearbox I did a couple of years ago.

 

Next up, undo the passenger side wheel, jack the car up, slide the wheel under the sill with an old tyre on top as a stand. 2 of the 4 bolts I undid to remove the undertray sheared off, so I decided I'd just bend it back out the way rather than risk any more of them doing the same.

 

DSC_0027.JPG

 

This gave me enough room to get at the drain plug, this is it with a 24mm socket on it already

 

DSC_0028.JPG

 

Access isn't great TBH, if it was on a lift it'd be a lot easier, but the lower suspension arm is kind of in the way, anyway I managed to get it undone with the long bar without smashing any fingers which is what usually happens when i do things like this. The old oil drained out, it was sort of gravy coloured.

 

DSC_0029.JPG

 

It looks worse than it is in this pic as its under the car, but it was a bit grim. Its hard for me to guess if its original or not, I guess as it never gets exposed to combustion gasses it never gets really black like engine oil, but it was definitely a bit ming.

 

So, out with the old, in with the new. I did the drain plug up and got the new oil. I carefully set up a clean funnel and spout then realised the bottles came with a natty spout thing built in

 

DSC_0030.JPG

 

The guide reckoned the box takes about 3 litres from empty, but you'll never drain all the old stuff out so 3x 1 litres should be fine. Luckily it was! I poured the first litre in the fill hole with my funnel and spout arrangement, then added another bottle by poking the built-in spot into the filler hole and squeezing the oil in. The guide said to keep squeeezing oil in until it flows back out the filler hole. seemed easy enough. It had taken 2 litres now, so i got the other bottle and squeezed some more oil in. It took about another 250ml then ran back out around the spout so I reckon its about right with 2.25L in the box plus whatever was left over. The new oil is very pale yellow colour, like vegetable oil.

 

This was what was left over

 

DSC_0032.JPG

 

next up was to put it all back together. I did up the filler hole bolt without dropping into the skuddy old oil in the washing up bowl below, did up the filler bolt and drain bolt as tight as I could, then refitted the undertray with the two bolts that survived. It seems mostly OK like this. 

 

this was the old stuff that came out. Gearbox oil reeks.

 

DSC_0031.JPG

 

then wheel back on, and down off the jack/wheel&tyre stand and put the battery back in.

 

I was knackered by this point, and the celica is boxed in currently so didn't take it out for a test drive. I'll probably do that tomorrow and see if the gearchange is improved. It was a bit notchy before so hopefully its made a difference.

 

Next job will be treating the rust and repainting the sill, I've got all the bits I need, I just have to wait for a sunny day to do it. stay tuned for more repair action!

 

 


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2003 Toyota Yaris

2004 SAAB 9-3

1998 Toyota Celica ST

 

1996 Nissan Almera GX (departed)

198? Jago Geep (Now resideing chez red5)

368728.png

 

Yeah yeah, another blog. Why I use silly hardware to mine cryptocurrency: https://piminer.home.blog/


#38 OFFLINE   tobyd

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 04:19 PM

Gearbox oil is a close second behind brake fluid on the horrible car fluids scale IMO.

 

did you trawl a magnet in the old stuff for instant win finds?


'99 Skoda Octavia 1.6 'Petrol Blue' (green) £90

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#39 OFFLINE   Stanky

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 04:23 PM

Ha, I wasn't that brave! I'll assume that as its Japanese it probably doesn't do things like that. Having said that, the Almera had a magnetic drain plug so i'd be surprised if this wasn't magnetic too, and there was no 'glittering disappointment' on the drain plug on this one, unlike the Nissan.


2003 Toyota Yaris

2004 SAAB 9-3

1998 Toyota Celica ST

 

1996 Nissan Almera GX (departed)

198? Jago Geep (Now resideing chez red5)

368728.png

 

Yeah yeah, another blog. Why I use silly hardware to mine cryptocurrency: https://piminer.home.blog/


#40 OFFLINE   Wingz123

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 06:16 PM

Are you going to take for a run and cycle through the P, R, N, D etc a few times then check the level again? I’ve got to do this on the Spacewagons autobox as the gear changes are a little violent and sometimes she revs up before revs die down again between gears....

Doubt the fluid has ever been done

Good work :)


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#41 OFFLINE   Stanky

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 06:55 PM

This is a select-it-your-bloody-self gearbox but yes, tomorrow I plan to take it out for a run, I need to get the front wheels balanced really and am off work tomorrow so might as well do it then. If not tomorrow then the next day and see if the gearchange is improved.

 

Autoboxes frankly scare me, and the only time I've needed ATF changed I farmed it out to a specialist to do for an altogether reasonable sum. To be fair, it did improve the smoothness of the changes dramatically and is now good for another 70k miles which will probably see the car out. This was on the Saab, details on the boring moderns section.

 

I've ordered all the auxilliary belts from GSF and will be ordering the cambelt kit and water pump once some paypal money clears and will set about the belts with my brother (tobyd of this parish) next month. looking at access for most of them it looks like 3/10 for fun.


2003 Toyota Yaris

2004 SAAB 9-3

1998 Toyota Celica ST

 

1996 Nissan Almera GX (departed)

198? Jago Geep (Now resideing chez red5)

368728.png

 

Yeah yeah, another blog. Why I use silly hardware to mine cryptocurrency: https://piminer.home.blog/


#42 OFFLINE   Wingz123

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 07:06 PM

Ah my bad! Well hopefully it’ll be better than what it was!

Virtually nothing online whatsoever regarding spacewagons - looked at the sales figures and in one year nearing end of production they sold 40 in one year....

Lovely looking Celica...keep it coming!
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2002 Audi A6 Avant 1.9TDi PD130

1998 Mitsubishi Space Wagon

2005 Mercedes Sprinter 311CDi Recovery Truck

2007 Ford Fiesta 1.6TDCi

2009 Toyota Avensis T27 Tourer 2.2 D4D

2013 Toyota Prius 1.8 Hybrid

2010 Ford Focus Estate 1.6TDCi Ecomotive

2000 BMW 328ci E46

1998 BMW 523i se E39

 


#43 OFFLINE   spartacus

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 07:12 PM

Good job Stanky. Gear oil is just the smelliest stuff when you get it on your overalls or hands, if you went in for dinner and didn't get admonished for the smell then that's a result!
If you haven't had the wheels balanced yet then it's probably more likely to be the rears at that sort of speed, fronts usually manifest themselves at speeds up to 65. Although I take no responsibility for being wrong!

#44 OFFLINE   Stanky

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 07:27 PM

Spacewagons are GR8, once in the mid 1990s when I was about 10 our family and another family (4 adults, 4 kids) drove from Ipswich to near Florence, Italy in one, via Interlaken in Switzerland. With 2 weeks worth of luggage. It was actually really good fun. I think my brother had to sit between the front seats in the area commonly reserved for the handbrake.

 

Spartacus, I'll probably get them all balanced when I'm there, it'll only be twenty quid or so, no great hardship.


2003 Toyota Yaris

2004 SAAB 9-3

1998 Toyota Celica ST

 

1996 Nissan Almera GX (departed)

198? Jago Geep (Now resideing chez red5)

368728.png

 

Yeah yeah, another blog. Why I use silly hardware to mine cryptocurrency: https://piminer.home.blog/


#45 ONLINE   Parky

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Posted 17 June 2018 - 07:33 PM

It is one of those jobs that may not show immediate or tangible results but you know it’s been done. Peace of mind.

I always change gear oil on heaps, mainly because I can pretty much guarantee nobody else has before my ownership.
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#46 OFFLINE   Stanky

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 08:42 PM

I took the Celica out for a run on Monday morning to see what the gearchange was like post oil refresh and its quite a lot nicer, less lumpy to change and quieter - its not transformed the car, but its certainly improved things. While I was out I took the car to get the front wheels balanced, they needed about 8kg of lead weights to get right, but its helped no end - no vibration at all now and whizzes up to 70+mph easily. Its also made the handling more precise, so another £10 well spent. 

 

The next job on the 'To Do' list was to have a serious look at that weird bleb of surface rust on the middle of the driver side sill. This is what it looked like on Saturday morning

 

1.JPG

 

It was manky on the surface, but totally solid underneath. I don't know why it had gone like this - It isn't where a stonechip would strike and was very localised - probably about 2" across? Anyway, out with the heavy weapons

 

2.JPG

 

I'm still recovering from some surgery and this is a lot easier on my back than the gearbox oil job was! Having taken it back to clean-ish metal with the wire brush in the drill, it looked like this. Apparently The rust treatment gloop needs a bit of rust to bond to, so I left it here rather than take it right back to clean shiny steel. i may live to regret this

 

3.JPG

 

I also cleaned up around the edges, taking some good paint off in the process. This shouldn't matter. So out with the Shiters-approved remedy, Vactan.

 

4.JPG

 

And painted it on with a brush. It says the optimal thickness is 40 microns. I don't know what a micron looks like, so I just painted it on a bit.

 

5.JPG

 

its like painting with milk to be honest. After ten minutes I came back and it looked like this

 

6.JPG

 

So I painted some more on and left it for about 90 minutes while I did a few other jobs in the shed. Coming back to it, it had gone black and was completely dry to the touch. The bottle said it should dry in 10-20 minutes at 20 degress celcius. I reckon it was 24 here and there was a fresh wind blowing

 

7.JPG

 

Seemed to have dried off alright/soaked in and cured so onto the next stage. This wasn't the posh zinc primer that was used by Des, but since the Vatan reckoned it was self-priming I thought I'd go for a cheaper zinc primer on top. Being a fan of one of the premier pop-punk acts of the late 90s and early 00's I was sold on this. GR8 name for a tribute act if you ask me

 

8.JPG

 

Washed off the Vactan from the paintbrush and then painted on an initial coat of primer

 

9.JPG

 

As you can see, my artistic talent* is only matched by my facial beauty* in terms of LinkedIn skills. I'll not be giving up the day job... I waited for 4 hours then put another coat on and left it overnight to dry out throughly. 

 

The next morning I had some doctors appointments so the primer had until late morning to cure. When I got back to it I masked off the paint around the primer and set to it with some 600 grit wet 'n dry to rough the whole area up in preparation for paint.

 

10.JPG

 

I'd ordered a can of Toyota '3L2' Super Red and a can of lacquer from ebay during the week and it showed up promptly. I've done paintwork with rattle cans before on a metallic green Mk3 Golf and it went Ok, so i reasoned a flat colour should be easier, right?

 

11.JPG

 

I tried it out on a bit of cardboard in case it was green or something

 

12.JPG

 

Seems a decent match for faded ~20 year old paint, right? Off we go! This is the area after the first pass. 

 

13.JPG

 

Not a bad match I reckon. I left it for 25 minutes and gave it another light coat. By this point it was early evening so i called it a day. The next morning I had to go to the doc's again so left it a good 15 hours to cure, flatted it back with some 1200 wet 'n dry and put another coat on it, waited another couple of hours then put another coat (#4) on. I gave it 4 more hours then put one final coat on.

 

14.JPG

 

I'm pretty pleased with that overall. Next up I used some meths to clear up the overspray from the sill cover and the side of the seat. whoops!

 

15.JPG

 

After a little while I took the masking tape off to see what it was like

 

16.JPG

 

I'm not unhappy with that. Gently cleaned it up with meths to get the sticky masking tape residue off and took a step back

 

17.JPG

 

If you know what you're looking at you can see the edges, but overall its not a bad match. I left it until about half past 8 to dry off, gave the area a light sand with the 1200 grit wet 'n dry over the whole area and smoothed the edges down as much as I could, then gave it a spray over with the lacquer. Here is a closeup afterwards

 

18.JPG

 

With the door closed you can barely see the repair work I reckon

 

20.JPG

 

Overall I'm really pleased, its taken 3 days to do including drying time for the various coats of paint, its had 2 lots of Vactan, 2 lots of zinc primer, 5 coats of red and 4 of lacquer. I might do another coat of lacquer tomorrow but I'll see how it goes. if you know what you're looking for you can see its been redone, but considering I've not really done this before, certainly not with actual rust converter and stuff, I'm pretty pleased. I'm not in any hurry to do it again though, it takes bloody ages doing all the prep (and I'm just doing what I think is right, doing it properly is probably even MORE time consuming!) but it looks a million times better already. Hopefully it'll stay that way for a while.

 

Thanks for reading, and sorry for all the red. Your monitor will recover eventually. You eyes, maybe less so?


  • worldofceri, danthecapriman, holbeck and 11 others like this

2003 Toyota Yaris

2004 SAAB 9-3

1998 Toyota Celica ST

 

1996 Nissan Almera GX (departed)

198? Jago Geep (Now resideing chez red5)

368728.png

 

Yeah yeah, another blog. Why I use silly hardware to mine cryptocurrency: https://piminer.home.blog/


#47 OFFLINE   andy18s

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 08:50 PM

Hows your battery?
Or did you turn the interior lights off whilst leaving the door open? lol
Ive seen similar rust spots where seatbelts have been slow to retract,buckle gets caught in the closing door and take a wodge of paint off...
Soobaaarooo Legacy for the awd fun
XT600z Tenere for the off road fun
Happy trails....

#48 OFFLINE   Stanky

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 08:54 PM

The interior light was disabled throughout for this exact reason! I hadn't thought about the seatbelt buckle - thats probably a fair shout TBH


2003 Toyota Yaris

2004 SAAB 9-3

1998 Toyota Celica ST

 

1996 Nissan Almera GX (departed)

198? Jago Geep (Now resideing chez red5)

368728.png

 

Yeah yeah, another blog. Why I use silly hardware to mine cryptocurrency: https://piminer.home.blog/


#49 OFFLINE   Stanky

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 04:07 PM

While buying the Celica, I knew there was an ABS issue. Today I went digging for what exactly it might be. The issue had been expertly hidden by tactical removal of the ABS light on the dash so step #1 was to reinstate this to work out whats wrong. The Celica predates OBD2 requirements in Europe as its pre-2001 so diagnostics involve small flashing lights and tactically deployed paperclips. Anyway, on with the writeup. To begin with, I had to take the instrument binnacle out to refit the ABS light bulb. Here we are at the beginning

 

DSC_0007.JPG

 

Its all held in with phillips screws, 4 removed and unplugged the headlight height adjuster and the lower bit comes off

 

DSC_0008.JPG

 

Exposing the lower screws for the upper bit of the shroud

 

DSC_0009.JPG

 

4 more screws and the cluster lifts out. There is enough slack on the multiplugs behind to get the binnacle out behind the steering wheel, and then unplug them

 

DSC_0010.JPG

 

Flip it over and you can see the conspicuous absence of 2 dashboard warning lights

 

DSC_0011.JPG

 

This is the one we're after.

 

DSC_0012.JPG

 

I'd managed to misplace the ABS lightbulb (it subsequently turned up) so I swapped the airbag light into the ABS light slot and plugged the mutiplugs back in. I just sat the binnacle on the dash top rather than refitting it all because I knew I'd need to get it back out again.

 

So, turn the key to position 2 and check it lights up.

 

DSC_0013.JPG

 

Ok good. well, not good, but not a surprise. Next up, deploy the shiters choice, the bent bit of wire.

 

DSC_0014.JPG

 

there is a 'diagnostics' plug in the engine bay

 

DSC_0015.JPG

 

you pop the cap open and pull out a bridging pin

 

DSC_0016.JPG

 

Then use the bent wire to bridge the slot marked E1 and the one marked TC. The bent wire I had was too big so I found an old paperclip and used that instead. It fitted perfectly.

 

So, with the connections bridged, you then get in the drivers seat, turn the key to position #2 and watch the ABS light carefully. It lights up, stays on for ~3 seconds then goes off for a couple more seconds then you get a series of flashes which translate into codes, you look these up to work out what might be wrong. FFS really guys? Is that the best job you could do? *sigh*

 

So, I was rewarded with:

 

one flash - pause - one flash

 

longer pause

 

three flashes - pause - two flashes

 

longer pause

 

three flashes - pause - one flash

 

5 second pause

 

repeat.

 

So, thats ABS errors 11, 31 and 32 which according to this forum post from another forum I use translates to:

 

11 — Open shorted relay circuit. Check modulator wiring harness, solenoid relay, solenoid relay wiring harness and solenoid relay connector.

31 — Problem in right front wheel speed sensor circuit.

32 — Problem in left front wheel speed sensor circuit. 

 

that's annoying. I sort of hoped it was one sensor or something simple, sounds like its potentially several things. Oh well. 

 

So, troubleshooting. Step 1 was to check the ABS module fuse. 

 

DSC_0018.JPG

 

DSC_0019.JPG

 

Looks Ok to me. Curses. Alright, whats next? There is no info on whether the order the codes come out in means anything. They weren't coming out in numerical order (3-2 came before 3-1) so I decided to look at the solenoid first. My rationale was that if this was broken/malfunctioning then the 'downstream' codes may be false positives. Not sure if this is correct because electrical things frighten and confuse me in equal measures, but seemed logical at the time. 

 

So, pop open the relay box and have a look

 

DSC_0020.JPG

 

Ok well its not melted or anything visible, The wiring looks intact underneath and isn't chafed, so lets see if we can get it out to test it? Good grief, what a horrible job! You need to pop the bottom off the little house the relays live in, then lift it off its mounting bracket but there isn't enough slack cable to move it very far, so you have to slide in two blades to get the tangs on the side of the relay to unclip from the house, then wiggle it free. easy right? Ha.

 

Because the house is smoll, and there are relays immediately below and next to the green one I needed to remove you can't get a good grip on the ABS relay to wiggle it out. I ended up resorting to VERY careful use of mole grips to grab the top of the relay and wiggle it as much as I dared. I was sure it was going to shatter and be ruined, but it eventually let go and came out

 

DSC_0021.JPG

 

And was rewarded with one ABS solenoid relay, minus the two tangs which had snapped off. Ridiculous piece of design.

 

DSC_0022.JPG

 

Now, there is nothing visually wrong with the solenoid, and I'm not sure how to test it. It has 6 pins and I have a multimeter, does anyone cleverer than me know how I can test the function of this? Or do I just go onto ebay and buy a replacement one for £8 and fit that in its place and see what happens? I suppose testing it will potentially highlight why the front circuit is sad, but the back circuit is fine? (assuming it has ABS on all 4 wheels, I think it does?) but what do i need to check? 

 

Have any of the previous custodians got any further than this, and potentially be able to rule out any other components?

 

I've got loads of MOT left, but I take it the new rules mean I can't just forget* to replace the ABS light come MOT time and get a pass any more? It has to light up, and then go out and stay out, right?

 

 

 

 


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2003 Toyota Yaris

2004 SAAB 9-3

1998 Toyota Celica ST

 

1996 Nissan Almera GX (departed)

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#50 ONLINE   Hooli

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 04:28 PM

They should work like a relay as far as I know. You'd need a wiring diagram to know how to test it though, anything printed on it like relays often have?

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#51 OFFLINE   Stanky

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 04:39 PM

Sadly not, just the part number 88263-24030, the names Toyota and Denso 'Made in Japan'


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#52 OFFLINE   Stanky

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 05:11 PM

Gone mental and ordered a preloved relay from ebay for £6.14 delivered, due to land either friday or saturday so i'll put that in and repeat the process and see how we get on. It'd be nice if its that and the 'downstream' error codes are not real issues.


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#53 ONLINE   Hooli

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 05:29 PM

I guess with six pins it might switch front n rear separately so it could explain the wheel sensors issues.

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#54 ONLINE   clayts450

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 06:24 PM

I took the Celica out for a run on Monday morning to see what the gearchange was like post oil refresh and its quite a lot nicer, less lumpy to change and quieter - its not transformed the car, but its certainly improved things. While I was out I took the car to get the front wheels balanced, they needed about 8kg of lead weights to get right, but its helped no end - no vibration at all now and whizzes up to 70+mph easily. Its also made the handling more precise, so another £10 well spent. 

 

The next job on the 'To Do' list was to have a serious look at that weird bleb of surface rust on the middle of the driver side sill. This is what it looked like on Saturday morning

 

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It was manky on the surface, but totally solid underneath. I don't know why it had gone like this - It isn't where a stonechip would strike and was very localised - probably about 2" across? Anyway, out with the heavy weapons

 

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I'm still recovering from some surgery and this is a lot easier on my back than the gearbox oil job was! Having taken it back to clean-ish metal with the wire brush in the drill, it looked like this. Apparently The rust treatment gloop needs a bit of rust to bond to, so I left it here rather than take it right back to clean shiny steel. i may live to regret this

 

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I also cleaned up around the edges, taking some good paint off in the process. This shouldn't matter. So out with the Shiters-approved remedy, Vactan.

 

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And painted it on with a brush. It says the optimal thickness is 40 microns. I don't know what a micron looks like, so I just painted it on a bit.

 

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its like painting with milk to be honest. After ten minutes I came back and it looked like this

 

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So I painted some more on and left it for about 90 minutes while I did a few other jobs in the shed. Coming back to it, it had gone black and was completely dry to the touch. The bottle said it should dry in 10-20 minutes at 20 degress celcius. I reckon it was 24 here and there was a fresh wind blowing

 

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Seemed to have dried off alright/soaked in and cured so onto the next stage. This wasn't the posh zinc primer that was used by Des, but since the Vatan reckoned it was self-priming I thought I'd go for a cheaper zinc primer on top. Being a fan of one of the premier pop-punk acts of the late 90s and early 00's I was sold on this. GR8 name for a tribute act if you ask me

 

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Washed off the Vactan from the paintbrush and then painted on an initial coat of primer

 

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As you can see, my artistic talent* is only matched by my facial beauty* in terms of LinkedIn skills. I'll not be giving up the day job... I waited for 4 hours then put another coat on and left it overnight to dry out throughly. 

 

The next morning I had some doctors appointments so the primer had until late morning to cure. When I got back to it I masked off the paint around the primer and set to it with some 600 grit wet 'n dry to rough the whole area up in preparation for paint.

 

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I'd ordered a can of Toyota '3L2' Super Red and a can of lacquer from ebay during the week and it showed up promptly. I've done paintwork with rattle cans before on a metallic green Mk3 Golf and it went Ok, so i reasoned a flat colour should be easier, right?

 

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I tried it out on a bit of cardboard in case it was green or something

 

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Seems a decent match for faded ~20 year old paint, right? Off we go! This is the area after the first pass. 

 

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Not a bad match I reckon. I left it for 25 minutes and gave it another light coat. By this point it was early evening so i called it a day. The next morning I had to go to the doc's again so left it a good 15 hours to cure, flatted it back with some 1200 wet 'n dry and put another coat on it, waited another couple of hours then put another coat (#4) on. I gave it 4 more hours then put one final coat on.

 

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I'm pretty pleased with that overall. Next up I used some meths to clear up the overspray from the sill cover and the side of the seat. whoops!

 

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After a little while I took the masking tape off to see what it was like

 

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I'm not unhappy with that. Gently cleaned it up with meths to get the sticky masking tape residue off and took a step back

 

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If you know what you're looking at you can see the edges, but overall its not a bad match. I left it until about half past 8 to dry off, gave the area a light sand with the 1200 grit wet 'n dry over the whole area and smoothed the edges down as much as I could, then gave it a spray over with the lacquer. Here is a closeup afterwards

 

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With the door closed you can barely see the repair work I reckon

 

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Overall I'm really pleased, its taken 3 days to do including drying time for the various coats of paint, its had 2 lots of Vactan, 2 lots of zinc primer, 5 coats of red and 4 of lacquer. I might do another coat of lacquer tomorrow but I'll see how it goes. if you know what you're looking for you can see its been redone, but considering I've not really done this before, certainly not with actual rust converter and stuff, I'm pretty pleased. I'm not in any hurry to do it again though, it takes bloody ages doing all the prep (and I'm just doing what I think is right, doing it properly is probably even MORE time consuming!) but it looks a million times better already. Hopefully it'll stay that way for a while.

 

Thanks for reading, and sorry for all the red. Your monitor will recover eventually. You eyes, maybe less so?

 

This is a great guide mate as I have a couple of blebs I'd like to have a go at on the Streetshite. Thanks for the step by step - really helpful :)


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#55 OFFLINE   louiepj

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 06:25 PM

If your lucky the old relays cover is not too difficult to unseal or unclip for visual inspection for burnt points or electronics and if its switching ok.
Relays should have clear covers as it's quite satisfying watching them trip in and out. Or that might just be one my perversions?
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#56 OFFLINE   binhoker668

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 07:05 PM

I’m still quietly nervous about the lack of ABS on the Xantia tbh. It worked last week once, but then usually doesn’t. No warning lights on dash though. I guess relays are gonna have to be checked out....

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#57 OFFLINE   tobyd

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 11:28 PM

Hard to even guess but

 

Page Three

 

ok its for a '94 model, but that seems to be the right sort of era.

 

Seems to show both the front and back respectively have a joined up NCA line (no idea what NCA means, no-colour available says the internet) but having both fronts out simultaneously does suggest that you might want to investigate a Brown and Black wire that goes to port B16 (FSS, front-speed-sensor, there is an RSS too). These lines run into a control unit which also feeds the ABS light via another components. Might be worth a look.

 

Also has the 6 pins of the ABS Solenoid. If you can match up some colours on the diagram with known components you might be able to verify its the rightish direction. if the pins are falling out it might be a bit passed it anyway.


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#58 OFFLINE   Stanky

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Posted 28 June 2018 - 08:43 AM

See, diagrams like that are exactly why electricty confuses and scares me.

 

This brown and black wire, where does it go from? The relay socket? The new (to me) relay will be here tomorrow or saturday so I'll wait for that to arrive before I do anything else. I have no desire to remove any relays again so want to make sure i only fit one more into the socket. I can check the brown and black wire at the same time though.


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2004 SAAB 9-3

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#59 OFFLINE   tobyd

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Posted 28 June 2018 - 09:04 PM

If you can trace the wiring to the sensor you should have 3, a + and - one as labelled and the NCA one which might be anything.

 

I was pondering why the wires join up for front and back then thought "perhaps its best if there is a fault in the front that the ABS disables the front until its ok" but i don't know. I can't think of another reason to join up the two sensors in any other capacity?

 

pretty much follow the white rabbit wires as per the diagram and see where they go. I'd imagine the 3 wires per sensor arrive from each hub, up through the arch to some honking great bundle and become untraceable but you might be able to see whats involved in the multiplug on the ABS controller and work backwards to see where they bridge and check if the wires are ok.

 

If you can work out which wire is + and - (should be accurate to the colour on the diagram) you might be able to jumper them onto the wheel sensor and leave out the 3rd wire and see what the controller thinks then. similarly checking the voltages over the back, should have some voltage between + and - but checking over the NCA line on either other wire might give you a clue to how it works. If you can emulate the condition of the back on the front and convince the controller its ok you might get the light to go off. multimeter on ~20 vdc mode is pretty safe, dont use the amperage setting.

 

All this might just really be two duff front sensors.

 

have you tried removing, (gently) cleaning, (gently) sanding back the contacts of each sensor and checking again? Or removing them completely, tying them up out the way, driving around the block a bit and seeing if the fault code changes from 'problem' to 'open circuit'?


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#60 ONLINE   Hooli

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Posted 28 June 2018 - 09:09 PM


I was pondering why the wires join up for front and back then thought "perhaps its best if there is a fault in the front that the ABS disables the front until its ok" but i don't know. I can't think of another reason to join up the two sensors in any other capacity?

 

Agreed on the safety thing. How about a fault at the rear letting those wheels lock when the fronts don't, it'd be like ripping up the handbrake.


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