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Coal Not Dole's Scimitar - OMG Opening Quaterlights - Update 08/11/18

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#331 OFFLINE   coalnotdole

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Posted 01 August 2018 - 10:58 PM

 
Nice Y THO face on the centre console in that last photo too.

 
I'm channeling my inner geek here! but I've often thought the 5a dashboard look's like it should have been the inspiration for Darth Vader's mask ...
 
Well they are both evil collections of featureless geometric black plastic at least!

 
980a.jpg
 
20902e8b3a8f9a311aa4824876c4148b.jpg


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#332 OFFLINE   Hooli

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Posted 02 August 2018 - 08:18 AM

I bought the fuel warning light control module as the standard Lucas one tended to turn itself on randomly below half a tank. and would be on constantly below 1/3rd of a tank.

 

 

So about 40mile range on the original carbed V6?


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#333 OFFLINE   coalnotdole

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Posted 02 August 2018 - 12:15 PM

So about 40mile range on the original carbed V6?

 

Well Scimitars have a 17 gallon tank so I used to get at least 125 miles before the fuel warning light came on!


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#334 OFFLINE   Hooli

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Posted 02 August 2018 - 12:55 PM

15mpg? better than I'd have guessed tbh.


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#335 OFFLINE   coalnotdole

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 12:19 AM

Wiring and Electrics - Part 4

This post continues directly from the last one about the electrics overhaul. You may remember the main loom was unfinished and awaiting a final decisions on which fuse box I was going to use and where in the engine bay I was going to put some junction boxes...

I bought two junction boxes when I moved the battery location, but was waiting till the loom was ready before finalising where I was going to install them. The new boxes will become the main meeting points for all the major electrical terminals. The positive box has the connection points between alternator / battery / amplifier / ECU and wiring loom's feeds. The negative will connect battery to engine & chassis earth points and connect to the amplifier and ECU.

A number of location ideas were explored...

Under the wiper motor:

989.jpg

Next to the main loom:

990.jpg

On a bracket next to the loom:

991.jpg

A complex double stacked arrangement:

992.jpg

I've probably got 10 more alternate locations that were considered and rejected for some reason or another.

I decided in the end that there may be room at the forward end of the battery shelf. Close to the headlights. I had Just* enough length in the cables to reach this far...

993.jpg

A fibreglass bracket was made:

995.jpg

Looks promising.

996.jpg

In the absence of any better ideas it was decided this was probably the best available option.

The loom was then able to be trial fitted to the car in order to find the lengths of cables. (We were changing the branching point for the power feeds in the main loom and finalising the length of the alternator wiring.)

999.jpg

I had also finally got a solution for the fuse box... managing to find a new old stock one!



997.jpg

And a few new old stock brass terminals (and a selection of good used ones not pictured)

1002.jpg

Which meant I had a bare fuse box that could be populated with new terminals,

1001.jpg

Dave modified the fusebox with additional piggy-back wires soldered in to spread the load, rectifying the major weakness of the original design.

1003.jpg

The main loom was then complete and once the binding was finished it was ready to fit; not many photos of pulling it through. as it was an awkward process with Dave feeding the loom into the wing in the engine bay while I crammed myself in the passenger footwell to work each of the connectors through one by one...

All of this lot gets pulled through a 1" 3/4 hole!

1004.jpg

Sub-dash back in,

1004a.jpg

Making dash connections:

1005a.jpg


I then moved onto the rear wiring loom which runs under the car to connect to the tailight loom and all the way up the c-pillar to power the interior lights / heated rear window.

I've gone for modern AMP super-seal connectors for all the most weather exposed joints. As used on modern cars, These connectors require a set of econoseal / superseal crimping pliers to fit but they provide much better weatherproofing than the old lucas-rists connectors. modern car makers use this style connector in a range of vulnerable locations. On a modern car its common to see both econoseal and superseal style connectors but the plug shapes and sizes vary quite a bit. Presumably they make their own plugs under licence utilising standardised terminals inside.

Superseal connectors:

1005.jpg

1006.jpg


Rear loom:

1007.jpg

Loomtaping:

1008.jpg

The cleaning and evaluation process was completed by going through the tailight loom heres the finished article:

1009.jpg


I then fitted the rear loom and tail light looms to the car and was ready connect up the battery for testing...

Heres what happened when the power was connected:



Yes the new alternator shat itself with a major internal short... Back to the drawing board then.

Cheers for reading,

Joe
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#336 OFFLINE   MorrisItalSLX

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 12:41 AM

Bugger, that alternator looks scary!

Aside from that, exceptional work as always, really coming along a treat.
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#337 OFFLINE   castros_bro

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 08:48 AM

I've been on a conducted  tour of this (no not the wiring loom) and the ingenuity, workmanship and bodywork finish is more impressive in real life.


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#338 OFFLINE   Jim Bell

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 09:13 AM

Shame about the alternator suicide man. It was all going so well too.

858735.png


#339 OFFLINE   coalnotdole

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Posted 19 August 2018 - 10:25 AM

Cheers, The alternator actually did that twice the video was shot on the second attempt.
 
Heres a few pics from the autopsy...
 
Both regulator and brush box have got signs of having got incredibly hot on several of the soldered joints and theres signs of arcing between the brush box and regulator and the internal casting of the alternator. I guess the internal casing must different for internatlly regulated units to prevent this.
 
1010.jpg
 
1011.jpg
 
 
In the end it melted £45 worth of parts and I'm drawing a line under that particular unit and not wasting any more time and money on it.
 
I've bought another unit thats similar in size and has internal regulation as standard ( for Toyota Yaris MK1.) The bracket will need modifying to suit though! Here a picture of both alternators and the bracket on the bench:
 
1012.jpg

Please excuse the mess of part completed projects on the bench! A quick count shows parts from at least 6 GTE related jobs all going on at once! (ignore the seatbelts they are not Scimitar related)
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#340 OFFLINE   coalnotdole

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 10:43 AM

More on Electrics

After the alternator sparks incident I pushed on with the wiring and after a bit of time connecting stuff up I was finally in a position to start testing:

1012a.jpg

I've also renewed the towbar wiring connections. I've gone for 4.8mm piggyback terminals (https://www.componen...lated-pair.html) to connect the tow-bar wiring to the back of the bulbs, these replace an assortment of scotch locks, without needing to hack about with the original loom to add a multi-plug.

I then went in the shed to find my period Lucas towing board to test it:

1014.jpg

Around the same-time I also managed to refit the dashboard. Before going off on a tangent...

1013a.jpg

Brake Fluid Level switch:

As original equipment the 5a has brake fluid level warning switch in the cap of the master cylinder. Probably a smart precaution on a car that only has a single line braking system. I had an original one fitted briefly to the car in 2011 and it was worn out to the point of being useless. Frequently lighting up the warning light during hard cornering, every time it came on It was a false positive...!

Eventually I took it off and fitted a plain cap without a switch. But with the new loom going in and a desire to get as much of the OEM equipment working as possible I thought I should have another try...

A look in one of my lockup garages found a crate full of brake spares: (festering inside a rebel)

1015.jpg

Some rummaging later and I found a couple of original master cylinder caps both well passed their prime:

1016.jpg

Heres a closer look:

1017.jpg

1018.jpg

1019.jpg

Theres not much to the design really; its a cork on a steel rod which switches the contacts in the cap should the level get two low.

Replacement caps are AFAIK unavailable but the originals use a SOVY switch and are closely related to the design used on the Jaguar E type. Which are still available...

Best price seemed to be buying from sng barratt:

https://www.sngbarra...9a-73320daef4e4

Heres what arrived:

1020.jpg

Time to start taking it apart.... The difficult bit is drilling the domed rivets out of the top of the cap...

1021.jpg

1023.jpg

The aluminum shroud around the cork drilled off easily.

1022.jpg

with the cap in bits I could insert it into one of the used lids I've got... these have a hole with a lip which has been macined into a standard cap.

1024.jpg

Shame that the new and old plastics look a bit odd.

1025.jpg

The cork and shaft were shortened and the new switch was fitted into an old cap ( so that at least the plastics were the same colour...)

1026.jpg

Here it is on the car:

1027.jpg

It works! :

 



Still the faded yellow plastics were bugging me so. I managed to get Dave on the IOW to turn down a replacement cap... This was apparently an awkward thing to mount in a chuck and the plastic did not really machine that nicely.

Still the end result looked pretty good:

1028.jpg

1028a.jpg

I've since transferred all the parts over and heres the finished result which I'm pretty pleased with:

1029.jpg


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#341 OFFLINE   Jim Bell

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 01:28 PM

The seagulls seem to approve!

858735.png


#342 OFFLINE   coalnotdole

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 11:51 PM

The seagulls seem to approve!

 
You've lost me there!

Exhaust midboxes - Finished

This post carries on from my last post on exhaust midboxes. Its a bit of a break from the wiring posts. The main electrical work is now complete. Though there is another installment on radio fitment that I might come back to in future, If i can actually admit in public that I've ditched the Motorola Radio-cassette in favor of a modern* radio. :oops:

The last post on the exhaust system was on page 11, so this post contiues on from there: http://autoshite.com...0410/?p=1514504

I'd ripped up my old blowing drivers side midbox and bought some replacement silencers... with a view to welding them on to my exisiting pipes.

I sturgggled to get the passenger side silencer off, in the end it took lots of heat and a large hammer to free it from the tubular manifold...!

1035.jpg

The pipes i wanted to reuse were cut out and cleaned up with a flap disk.

1036.jpg

They turned out to not be a particulaly good fit in the new silencer. Not great for welding.

1037.jpg

So I took them to a local tube fabricator to get them stretched. Care was taken to avoid the old welds which could have cracked. Last time I came in they were making stainless handlebars for Raleigh choppers 8) I've had a few odd jobs done by this company in the past and they always do good work and dont mind doing small one off or custom jobs.

Heres a few pictures of the pipe being stretched:

1038.jpg

Test fitting:

1039.jpg

And a photo of their pipe bender just because I liked it:

1040.jpg

Heres the the finished job, £15 well spent:

1041.jpg

1042.jpg

Which was then ready Dave to weld:

1042a.jpg

Which menant the entire exhaust could finally be refitted:

1043.jpg

1044.jpg


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#343 OFFLINE   Jim Bell

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 04:42 AM

Seagulls= in the vid you posted earlier they were audibly screeching their approval.

That exhaust looks amazing. Seagull verdict unknown.
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858735.png


#344 OFFLINE   coalnotdole

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 12:12 AM

Doors & Doorframe Hardware, - Part 1

Looking at this photo you could be forgiven for thinking that I'd spent 6 months ignoring the doors..!

1045.jpg

But in amongst the other work I've been tacking odd jobs relating to the doors / door frames. Stripping the old frames off last year was the trigger point. The frames needed to come apart in order to fit a set of new quaterlight seals which have recently been remanufactured after being NLA for years. I'd bought a set as soon as they were available and they have been waiting for an opportunity to fit them ever since...

Heres a few reminder pictures that show the frames from before the respray:

1046.jpg

The passenger side quaterlight was taped up when I put the car on the road in 2011... which stopped an annoying whistling noise but looked awful!

The 2010 era base rubbers had never sat entirely right... (bought from a scimitar specialist)

1047.jpg

While the car was being painted I started taking the old frames apart...

1051.jpg

It quickly turned out that much of the steel door hardware was made of rust, many of these parts sit in a 'wet' areas and 45 years of damp was finally taking its toll.

One quaterlight pivot completely fell apart on removal.

1052.jpg

The corner brackets that hold the frames together were not really much better...

1053.jpg

I took apart two sets of window frames in the end and the condition of both sets was very similar... I'd guess there are lots of frames out there that due some attention... This put me off attempting to get more second hand spares and Instead I decided to remake the hardware from scratch. This time in stainless...

I sent the quaterlight pivot off to Dave on the IOW and he was able to turn down a suitable replacement. The shoulder that the spacer sits on was done on the mill. all told they consumed quite a few hours of work. The original spacers are being reused.

1054.jpg

He then brazed a piece of flat bar on to the top. One of the problems with remaking these in stainless was the difficulty getting stainless in the right thickness / diameter. In the end a batch of 3mmx 12mm wide flat bar was milled to be 3mm x 7.5mm.

1055.jpg

The spring support bracket was quite difficult to fold due to its tight curves, attempts to fold this on a bigger folder all proved impossible. But after a bit of messing about with some formers and some creative hammering and and I was able to get something pretty close...

1057.jpg

1058.jpg

All the brazed in rusty steel fixings were also removed from the bottom section of the window frame. Most were snapped off rusty stumps. I found it very hard to braze in the new fixings in without discolouring the chrome. So the majority of replacement bolts I'm using have captive heads instead.

1059.jpg

A first version of the frame brackets were also folded up...

1060.jpg

Drilled and tapped.

1061.jpg

I was finding working with stainless was quite hard on drill bits and taps. A tip from Dave saw me switch from using light grease /oil as a lubricant to Trefolex. Which probably saved the lives of many drill bits... It also smell great when you use it!

Its pretty good for tapping too:

1063.jpg

Random photo of bracket being trial fitted.

With replacement brackets sorted I could finally fit the new quaterlight rubbers into the frames. At this point it became painfully clear that my 'ok' window frames could definitely have done with rechroming... which would involve more expense and weeks of delay… maybe next time.

Heres a close up look at the new quaterlight rubbers.

1067.jpg


1068.jpg

Compared to the old ones that came off...

1065.jpg

1066.jpg

The new quaterlight seals are very well designed they are an excellent fit. The hard work getting these remade was done by Australian Victor Pace, who has been has been restoring a Scimitar GT, He’s got a extraordinarily detailed build thread here: http://www.scimitarw...hp?f=20&t=10292

 

The seals slide into the frames with a bit of help from some soapy water.

1069.jpg

The quaterlight pivot parts have all been replaced in stainless (including the spring)

1070.jpg

1071.jpg

I was then able to trial fit the frames on a door...

(Continued in the next post)


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#345 OFFLINE   coalnotdole

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 12:15 AM


Doors & Doorframe Hardware, - Part 2

Frames completed I was then able to trial fit them on the doors.

1072.jpg

1073.jpg

1074.jpg

I'm really pleased with the new seals, they are probably better in terms of finish and sealing than they would have been when new.

Before I could actually bolt them up I needed to sort out the trim that sits underneath the window frame. I damaged the old one while dismantling the doors, Its a vinyl cover backed on to 3mm scrim foam backed on to a plywood base board...

1075.jpg

1076.jpg

As all my bits of plywood were split I've gone for plastic mount board similar to that used on my door cards.

1077.jpg

The black vinyl gets sandwiched between a piece of channel section and the metal section that holds the drop glass felt. This is then riveted together... when I took my old doors apart some of the original channel sections had gone very rusty, causing bubbling under the vinyl.

1048.jpg

1049.jpg

In a bid to stop this happening again I've replaced the original channel with a new set in stainless...

1050.jpg

pre assembling the vinyl to the channel section:

1078.jpg

And then riveted to the door.

1079.jpg

The overhanging vinyl can then be folded round the plastic / plywood backing piece and trimmed,

1080.jpg

1081.jpg

and everything gets glued down with contact adhesive...

1082.jpg

The rest of the door furniture can then be built up... winder mechanism, plastic lining, door speaker and the frame can be bolted in.

The front capping piece is then screwed on...

1083.jpg

1084.jpg

1085.jpg

Heres a few more pictures once the door cards went back on...

1086.jpg

1087.jpg

Job like these always remind me of how labour intensive it must have been to mass produce a hand-built car like a Scimitar...


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#346 OFFLINE   vulgalour

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 08:15 PM

That's beautiful work.


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#347 OFFLINE   coalnotdole

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 08:53 PM

That's beautiful work.

 
Don't be fooled! I've edited out some of the less pro bits on this job! I probably wasted half a metre of stainless trying to make the little brackets for the quaterlight pivots and this happened while trying to get an old pop rivet out...
 
 1088.jpg
 
#NOTPRO
 
I'm now up to 3 areas where I'm going to need to get the paint work repaired...


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#348 OFFLINE   Jim Bell

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 10:15 PM

Holy shit. That must have stung a bit. Suddenly A HOLE.

858735.png


#349 OFFLINE   coalnotdole

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 10:39 PM

I treated my dad (who was supporting the door at the time) to a course in creative swearing...

 

I've since repaired the hole and dabbed a touch up over it so it doesnt stand out quite so much. I will get it fixed properly as its in such a visible spot.

 

It was really shit at the time, I'm slightly calmer about it now. Shit happens and its fixable. I keep having to remind myself that the origonal objective was to get the car presentable not concourse!


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#350 OFFLINE   mk2_craig

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 05:33 PM

I think you've gone way beyond presentable with most of the work carried out. What an ace thread, glad you're keeping it so well updated, it's a smashing read!
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#351 ONLINE   fastblatt

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Posted 10 November 2018 - 05:47 PM

Just read this whole thread. Brilliant work and to a great standard. The car should last you many years now.
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#352 OFFLINE   vulgalour

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Posted 10 November 2018 - 06:23 PM

Distressing images!  I prefer the edited version.


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