Jump to content


Welcome to Autoshite

Welcome to Autoshite, like most online communities you must register to view or post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process that requires minimal information for you to signup. Be apart of Autoshite by signing in or creating an account.
  • Start new topics and reply to others
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
  • Get your own profile and make new friends
  • Customize your experience here
Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo

Yugoslavian Ami.., continuing on from 'now-autoshites-flimsy-bodied Shitroen'


  • Please log in to reply
541 replies to this topic

#391 OFFLINE   dollywobbler

dollywobbler

    Mr HubNut

  • Full Members
  • 24,104 posts
  • 26 thanks
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 26 April 2017 - 08:54 PM

Yup, the special tool makes life a lot easier, even on a 2CV, which has far better access than that! Had to nip mine up on Sunday. Should be fine for a while. By which I mean a couple of weeks...


1972 Invacar Model 70, 1973 AC Model 70

1986 Citroen 2CV6, 1995 Lexus LS400
1997 Honda S-MX, 2001 Perodua Nippa
HubNut Blog      HubNut Vids    Twatter


#392 OFFLINE   Bfg

Bfg

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationWesterfield, Suffolk, England, UK
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 26 April 2017 - 09:00 PM

.

does the cam need adjusting every few weeks ..or even months (with a feeler gauge) or just the bowden cable ?


 ...its a bloody motor car  ..not a Fabergé egg. !

.

< Here > is a link to my former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website.

And the story of my buying & now restoring a  1974 Yugoslavian Ami-Super  is < Here >

.


#393 OFFLINE   dollywobbler

dollywobbler

    Mr HubNut

  • Full Members
  • 24,104 posts
  • 26 thanks
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 26 April 2017 - 09:09 PM

.

does the cam need adjusting every few weeks ..or even months (with a feeler gauge) or just the bowden cable ?

 

As far as I know, the cables should rarely need adjusting, with the cams needing a tweak a couple of times a year (or just before the MOT perhaps!).


1972 Invacar Model 70, 1973 AC Model 70

1986 Citroen 2CV6, 1995 Lexus LS400
1997 Honda S-MX, 2001 Perodua Nippa
HubNut Blog      HubNut Vids    Twatter


Thanked by 1 Member:
Bfg

#394 ONLINE   RayMK

RayMK

    Rank: BL Wedge

  • Full Members
  • 714 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationMidlands
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 26 April 2017 - 09:11 PM

Many cars have access problems which suggest to me that the design departments for bodywork, engine, suspension and brakes were entirely separate and forbidden to talk to each other.   Citroen appears to have taken this bloody irritating philosophy a stage further by making everything as unconventional as possible.  It is all wonderful while it keeps working.  I remember when I came  to service my CX Gti Turbo 2 for the first time that I could not spot the oil filter.   Eventually, after 5 minutes of searching whilst lying under the car with a torch, I found it.  I never did discover how one was supposed to get tools to it and replace it - I took the car to the dealer instead.

 

Anyway, well done, and another job ticked off.



Thanked by 1 Member:
Bfg

#395 OFFLINE   Bfg

Bfg

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationWesterfield, Suffolk, England, UK
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 26 April 2017 - 09:20 PM

There is a special tool. It's been a long long time since I did it but I think the 2cv is a 24 eccentric adjuster too so check out Ecas or 2cv city etc for the tool. My dad made one for me iirc.

E.T.A. http://www.ecas2cvpa...otes-p-143.html

 

Thanks, that looks like it would be a great help and for 12.50 plus postage it would certainly be worth having in the car's toolkit.  B) 


 ...its a bloody motor car  ..not a Fabergé egg. !

.

< Here > is a link to my former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website.

And the story of my buying & now restoring a  1974 Yugoslavian Ami-Super  is < Here >

.


#396 ONLINE   forddeliveryboy

forddeliveryboy

    Rank: Citroën Ghia

  • Full Members
  • 7,757 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationEurope
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 26 April 2017 - 09:58 PM

I think kingpins and handbrakes were designed to keep dealers busy, back in the day. The 2cv was so tough and long-lasting the company probably thought long and hard how to do the equivalent of the Peugeot back axle, but without making a car dangerous to drive. They even marked parts with special paint, to try and combat worn out parts from someone's previous car being swapped to their new one, ready for free replacement.

Thrifty French farmers, who having found out how much disc replacement was when their cheap* mechanic got it wrong, soon realised it made sense to have someone who could do the job right first time while ordinary users were simply reminded that their car needed a service once the handbrake ran out of travel. If they're done right, you remember not to leave the handbrake on, don't drive like a maniac and the discs aren't worn out, they can last for a couple of years before 5 minutes adjustment is needed. But a year/10k miles is more realistic, in the real world.

Kingpins were the killer 'cheaper to buy a new car, Madame' when after six or seven years they were a little worn' (dealer prices to change them was outrageous, even in France). Something like a quarter of the price of a new car, ffs.

Those handbrake pads are very soft and wear out fast if done wrong, yet hard enough to score a disc if they bind in the slightest. After two or three times adjusting, it gets easier. I remember once being asked to look at the points on a Fiesta, total nightmare even to get the dizzy cap off - horses for courses!
  • Bfg likes this

#397 OFFLINE   Bfg

Bfg

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationWesterfield, Suffolk, England, UK
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 27 April 2017 - 03:00 PM

.

Many cars have access problems which suggest to me that the design departments for bodywork, engine, suspension and brakes were entirely separate and forbidden to talk to each other.   Citroen appears to have taken this bloody irritating philosophy a stage further by making everything as unconventional as possible.  It is all wonderful while it keeps working.  I remember when I came  to service my CX Gti Turbo 2 for the first time that I could not spot the oil filter.   Eventually, after 5 minutes of searching whilst lying under the car with a torch, I found it.  I never did discover how one was supposed to get tools to it and replace it - I took the car to the dealer instead.

 

Anyway, well done, and another job ticked off.

 

Most car designs are both a parts bin and a compromise to styling, legislation, and costs.  More so when the product is relatively cheap, the company is struggling, &/or the volumes of production are low (or uncertain).

 

The car designs I've been personally involved in have each taken their mechanical train and substantial parts of the chassis from an already established source and then re-clothed them - either for an alternative use, or as an update.  That happened from the very earliest days in the motor industry ..when engines were manufactured by one company, various elements of their drive train by other companies, and the body work added by coach-builders, before going off to the trimmers. 

 

Nowadays..,  both individual parts and complete assemblies are similarly brought in from one manufacturer to be used by another.   ".. the design departments for bodywork, engine, suspension and brakes were entirely separate and forbidden to talk to each other."  Nope they simply have never met, nor will they. They probably work for different companies and speak a different language ..of their own continent !

 

In-house designs are no better.. In fact it's almost unheard of to have an engine / mechanical train designed together with the body. The resources within any company generally don't manage to get the new bodywork geared up for production in the same month (or year) as the engine is ready to go.  And then components for each have come from the 'parts bin' because it's rarely cost effective to tool up everything anew.

 

Of course computer aided design (like Catia) should help with design unity, but.. from what I've experienced - the CAD technician takes computer modeled parts and assembles them (..without either hand or tool in the way) in their colourful but sterile clean, nine decimal point accurate cyberspace ..which can be flown through like a demented helicopter pilot through high-rise city-scape bellowing at the top of his voice as if in 'Nam :lol:  (..all done by someone who has never used a torque-wrench in his or her youthful life).

 

Add to these factors of the car's style &/or crash protection and things get even more out of hand.  Possibly one of the most accessible car's engine bay ever was the Triumph Spitfire with its fully opening bonnet.  This of course was derived from the Herald ..which later developed into the six cylinder GT6 and Vitesse respectively. Inbetween times there had already been a number of engine size changes, gearbox options, and ancillary upgrades. 

 

In my view it was a brilliant style ..but I wonder how these cars would cope in a contemporary crash test ?  And if still OK., then is the separate chassis (..or sub-frame in the case of the E-type Jag) an economical way to build a car.?  Bolt on panels are a blessing when major work is necessary, but it is really far cheaper and more accurate to spot weld them together. And they then become part of the vehicle's structure.

 

Of course pretty much everything built into a car also has to have 'approval',  from most humble fastening (being strong enough that bits don't fall off) to the air vent on the dashboard not finding your passenger's face in the event of a crash. The cost of retooling any part, and then retesting 'for approval' (across different international markets) is bad enough, but then the testing authorities need that part to be tested 'in place' with its overall design too - then things get really expensive.  So, for example a seat may be used in one model of car, but it's mountings are questioned when placed inside another (even similar) vehicle.  Likewise something like a rear lamp lens may be fine on one car but its angle of visibility needs to be checked for the new car.

 

As a consequence when I was in car design we had to (by force of economy) use already approved parts ..and in such a fashion as to not alter their geometry or loading at all.  An example of this was the chassis ..it retained exactly the same engine mounts, and front & rear suspension mounting structure, along with the steering & brakes, fuel tank mountings, etc - to avoid the excruciating cost of testing ..to destruction. We did alter sections of the chassis though, and that needed new 'type approval'.  But we avoided 90% of those costs and the inevitable delay into production. Things like the electrics though still had to be tested with the finished car.. for radio interference, because their position in and the type of body shell was different. Once the design & specification had been approved we could not change it (in any significant way).

 

No, we will rarely see a 'unified' car design.  Perhaps just one or two as the industry moves across to electric, but still.. things like the suspension, steering and brakes are likely to be adapted from what already exists. 

 

Bfg ;) 

 

p.s.  motorcycles when designed around a new motor are somewhat different, but even then the criteria of one department (engine design versus chassis design for example) are often conflicting..  "Where else can the damn thing go !?" says the engine designer who needs to keep it oil tight, compact, lightweight, and affordable to produce ..and so the chassis designer has to accommodate it.  Some time thereafter a chap is called in to do the wiring ! "Oi., you can't drill a hole through there mate !"  :shock:

15,431 views


  • pompei, forddeliveryboy and RayMK like this

 ...its a bloody motor car  ..not a Fabergé egg. !

.

< Here > is a link to my former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website.

And the story of my buying & now restoring a  1974 Yugoslavian Ami-Super  is < Here >

.


#398 ONLINE   forddeliveryboy

forddeliveryboy

    Rank: Citroën Ghia

  • Full Members
  • 7,757 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationEurope
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 27 April 2017 - 04:21 PM

You've got me wondering just what bits of which cars you're responsible for, Pete...

#399 ONLINE   3VOM

3VOM

    Rank: BL Wedge

  • Full Members
  • 589 posts
  • 10 thanks
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 29 April 2017 - 09:40 AM

There was a video I think someone put on here but I'm not sure, in which it was being discussed that BMW? had built a plant to make carbon fibre bodywork for only $100m-120m. The going rate for a car manufacturing plant being $450m. I have an internet mate who has something to do with a gearbox plant which cost $900m. The point being that with those costs you can't make a body, engine, gearbox etc. all on your own because the cost would be prohibitive.


  • Bfg likes this

What's the retail on one of those plumbed in fire extinguisher systems?


#400 OFFLINE   Bfg

Bfg

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationWesterfield, Suffolk, England, UK
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 29 April 2017 - 04:40 PM

.

^  Does make me wonder where so many millions go.?  Certainly even when working with GKN ..as a contractor (suspension appraisal & design) and was earning mega money (well it seemed like that at the time !) ..it would have taken an army of us to tot up a million quid.  

 

That number of zeros must go to the senior Directors ..who were responsible for the collapse of manufacturing and pension funds in this country. :shock:

 

 

Anyways up.. Yesterday evening I gave the LH front & rear wings a skim of epoxy filler ..which I hope is still OK., despite being lumpy and a few years old now.  This morning it wasn't hard enough to rub down, so decided to do a little more mechanical work while access was still good. 

 

To n' from the MOT station (..which is still the only time I've used the car in this country) the engine started just fine and ran at slow speed with no problem, but was running pretty awfully when I tried to pick up the pace a little.. Once through the zombie zone ..given a lengthy stretch of country road and no very-inconsiderate other car driver (..being in front of me :mad: ) the engine felt a little better, but she needed choke to get up there.  

 

This to me suggested either a blockage in fuel getting through ..anywhere from tank (which was in the rear foot wells when the car was bought), through the limiting one way valve and filter, through the old (unknown) pump, and into / through any of the jets or fuel cut off valve.  Or else these symptoms of poor running might have been an air leak directly into the manifold.  I might add that I've only set up the ignition timing statically - so that might be contributing to the dire effect.  Also., the car had no auto-advance vacuum when I drove in Slovenia. :shock:

 

So today I set to checking the carburettor.  Bearing in mind the car had sat for 16 years before I got her, and then has been in workshop hibernation for another 15 months (yes it really has been that long !). Then has only driven slowly around the houses in Slovenia, onto and off transport, and then (with auto advance now fitted..) the 25 miles around trip to the MOT station.  I really wouldn't have been surprised to find a swallow's nest tucked inside the carb.

 

I duly pulled the carb off and gave it an external scrubbing ..as there's little point in struggling to keep the insides clean ..when the outside case & its fastenings, and my own fingers n' tools are filthy.  I found a tray (actually a hot-plate cover) as somewhere clean to work on and catch the bits + drips of cleaner. . .

Ami Super - Weber Carb P1240698s.jpg

 

I squirted carb cleaner through each jet I found, but was a little concerned about this kinked rubber . . .

Ami Super - Weber Carb P1240708bs.jpg

 

The tube itself was fine insomuch as it allowed air through but it was hard and not sealing well on the pipe fittings into the carb.  One pipe fitting I slipped a piece of rubber tube over to check that its jet was clear, and in removing the tube the jet came out ..very easily.   NB. After cleaning and checking the rest of the carb., I put this back in with Locktite. 

 

Took a few bits off ..,cleaning and checking as I went..

P1240715as.jpg

^ Before cleaning.. No swallows nor anything else's nest inside there. In fact the carb was cleaner than I had honestly expected it to be ..and no sign of corrosion anywhere (which is v. common with the motorcycle carbs I've worked on).  Naturally I checked the fuel level's float and its the needle valve. 

 

The purpose of the exercise was to clean (particularly to blast through each jet), to check things (for example spindle or other wear, and the aforementioned rubber tube) and to rectify as required. It was not to strip the carb into every single part for no particularly good reason. 

 

In checking I noted that the gasket face was bowed by about 0.010" (due to being bolted at its ends only).  I suspect an air leak through this to be the cause of the running problems.  I carefully redressed that with a sharp hand file ..as best I might without dismantling everything. :ph34r:  NB. There are no paper gaskets under this carb, only the heat insulator.

 

P1240717as.jpg

^ work in progress. The still dull gasket face is bowed so the file, laid flat, is only cutting the ends away.  Despite not dismantling the carb (where I could have used a flat surface to true it up) given time and due care to keep the file flat ..it leveled up fine and not twisted.  It then took a bit more care in cleaning to ensure that no filings were inside.

 

P1240721s.jpg

 

Satisfied that each of the jets were clear and that everything was now in decent working order (nothing has been adjusted), I lubricated springs, pivots and any swivel with aerosol chain lube or copperslip..

 

The heat-insulator spacer-gasket likewise needed to be leveled / redressed. I checked its shape for fit against the carburettor venturi and the manifold holes, and the manifold was smaller ..which resulted in as much as a hard 2mm step.  I marked this with a black felt pen - ready to cut . . 

P1240722s.jpg

^ Again, not wanting to dismantle more than necessary ..I worked it in-situ.  So, to avoid aluminium filings from going into the manifold / engine ..I caked the inside of the orifice with grease and stuffed it with a carefully folded clean tissue. :huh:

 

I did my rounding of that hard-edged step, which imo is a fair compromise considering I didn't take the manifold off.  Very carefully cleaned around the manifold, equally carefully removed the tissue with bits of aluminium filing stuck to it, and then wiped out the grease with more caught bits.  As you can see straight into the bottom of the manifold I'm happy that nothing got by. . .

P1240723as.jpg

 

While with the manifold I looked to find the drain hole (which is there to stop a flooding carb draining straight into the cylinders).  It was totally and absolutely blocked ..which made me question whether the black dot I was looking at / probing was in fact a drain hole.?  However a piece of 0.6mm wire started to find a way in, and with repeated doses of carb cleaner eventually poked through the dried crud to the underside. . . :blink:

P1240732a.jpg

 

That sorted, I applied 'Wellseal' gasket goo to the manifold to sit the fibre insulator-spacer on, and then a smear around the venturi outlets on the carb ..leaving it ten or more minutes before reassembly. I've only just pinched it down at this conjuncture, using a 10mm spanner held in finger tips just about 40mm from the nut.  That's plenty tight enough until the gasket goo sets (otherwise it just squeezes out).

 

P1240741s.jpg

 

Job done, and the carb is labelled to remind me to tighten it sometime. I finished early ..to sit in the sunshine and enjoy a cup of real coffee :-P

 

Have a good weekend.

Bfg. ;)

 

p.s. the epoxy filler on the car's wings is going off nicely thank you very much ..with the warmth of the day.

15,544 views

     


  • pompei, forddeliveryboy, Asimo and 3 others like this

 ...its a bloody motor car  ..not a Fabergé egg. !

.

< Here > is a link to my former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website.

And the story of my buying & now restoring a  1974 Yugoslavian Ami-Super  is < Here >

.


#401 OFFLINE   Bfg

Bfg

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationWesterfield, Suffolk, England, UK
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 01 May 2017 - 04:58 PM

.

Good'ay..

 

dull, cool, windy and wet today.. so when better to do painting.. ! ? :?

 

As of midday.,  'twere like this . . .

P1240745s.jpg

 

Unfortunately, the single pack paint I used before, which was an oil/spirit based gloss, takes a jurassic age to go off ..and at the same time softens the seam sealer Janez used. As a result the seam sealer / paint just collected dust and then looked shit (rather than autoshite). . 

P1240746s.jpg

 

..so,  as I yet needed to paint the passenger footwell and luggage space of the car - I thought I'd quickly go over this section again too, in two-pack. That won't hurt because it's likely to get the most big-foot trampling anyway. 

 

After sweeping up and then three hours of continuously sucking in vapours . .  :wacko:

P1240753s.jpg

^ Looks as if its 12 foot long inside there, its actually about 8'-6" from the bulkhead to the boot shut, more if one were to measure up the slope of the foot well.  v

P1240757as.jpg

 

It'll need a second coat in places because this new compound Hemple's Polygloss is not nearly as thick as it used to be (so I can only apply it thin, otherwise it runs).  But it's a job I've wanted to see done for a long time. And I'm happy to loose the dull grey and see this warm white gloss in there instead :) 

 

Bfg ;) 


  • Asimo, RayMK, BenHar and 1 other like this

 ...its a bloody motor car  ..not a Fabergé egg. !

.

< Here > is a link to my former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website.

And the story of my buying & now restoring a  1974 Yugoslavian Ami-Super  is < Here >

.


#402 OFFLINE   Bfg

Bfg

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationWesterfield, Suffolk, England, UK
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 03 May 2017 - 07:08 PM

.

Isn't it amazing how long it takes to do so little.!?

 

P1240765s.jpg

^ The recess and holes just forward of the fuel-tank-sender's access panel are for the rear seat-belt mounts and the rear bench-seat's latch.  However without any seat-belt bolt being fitted into these (which go into a support brace spanning over the fuel tank) the body of the car lacks two usefully strong mountings, the rear seat is latched to the very thin sheet metal, and the darn floor reverberates against said support brace. :mad:

 

The above photo shows the two seat belt bolts I found in my stash of useful-one-day pots, cut to an appropriate length, and a piece of anti drumming pad to go between the boot floor and the support brace.  Needless to say this made a profound improvement in the lessening panel vibration / noise. 8)

 

Continuing on, with addressing the so easily resonated noise of very flimsy-bodied panel issue ..

Ami super - Anti-drumming P1240766s.jpg

 

with most of the off-cuts being used up here . .

P1240767s.jpg

^ although it may look somewhat Frankenstein - it proved surprising effective in dampening the fuel tank's hollow sound. That presently has around about five gallons of fuel within but before this anti-drum patchwork was added - it still made a din when tapped.. 

 

I the used the last of the rolls (two @ 4m x 150mm wide) on the underside of the fuel tank, which now has a dull bong when thumped as opposed to a resonating 'boing' sound. 

 

Bfg. ;)

 

I'll have to buy some more of that stuff, as I'm pleased with how well it works.

400 replies

15,685 views


  • Asimo and RayMK like this

 ...its a bloody motor car  ..not a Fabergé egg. !

.

< Here > is a link to my former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website.

And the story of my buying & now restoring a  1974 Yugoslavian Ami-Super  is < Here >

.


#403 OFFLINE   Bfg

Bfg

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationWesterfield, Suffolk, England, UK
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 04 May 2017 - 06:51 PM

.

Tyres ordered today..

 

I've never bought a complete set of new car tyres before so a first for Bfg  :shock:

 

Following recommendation of others - THANK YOU -  ..and otherwise assessing best I could - I chose to go with the Maxxis AP2 in 135/80R-15 ..not least because I as a rule I'd prefer all-season, and should I pop back to Slovenia (out of summer months) then I might well need them (if only to comply with legalities through various countries en-route). 

 

The best price I could find was via < Boss Tyres > @ £39 each.  So, the five tyres cost £195 inc delivery & tax.    Had I gone for the Nankang then I might have saved £45, but they are summer rated tyres only, the reviews I found were just a tad less favourable, they are regarded as economy rather than medium quality (which the Maxxis are), and the noise rating a single decibel more. 

 

Fitting will add another £55 - 60 (for the five) whichever tyre I went with.
 

I decided not to go with 145 section tyres as the Ami Super was designed for 135x15 tyres and I found no good reason to go even slightly bigger. 

 

In short ; I really don't need to limit the steering lock any more than it is,  and according to the gear ratio figures I've seen - the Ami Super already has a slightly tall gearing anyway. And larger tyres = larger rolling radius would simply mean dropping down a gear more often - which of course immediately negates any advantage of being long-legged on bigger tyres.  Furthermore, bigger tyres detract from braking performance, have more road scrub and so poorer fuel economy, and are slightly heavier. 

 

The decision has now been made.. so, for good or for bad - I'll live with it. :)

 

Bfg.


 ...its a bloody motor car  ..not a Fabergé egg. !

.

< Here > is a link to my former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website.

And the story of my buying & now restoring a  1974 Yugoslavian Ami-Super  is < Here >

.


#404 OFFLINE   Bfg

Bfg

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationWesterfield, Suffolk, England, UK
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 07 May 2017 - 08:29 AM

.

..during the latter part of this week ;  I made a pizza box template . .

 

P1240784 (600 x 450).jpg

 

..for the front mud flaps ..

P1240778s.jpg

^ This (when made in 3mm reinforced rubber) is to keep road crud off the bulkhead and jacking points, thus alleviating the mud traps designed in.  It might also help lessen road noise into the car.

 

I'm thinking that there should have been some sort of flap anyway ..if only just between the sides of the bulkhead and the front wings - as there's a flange with fastening holes. But I don't know what they were originally made of ..as this car's were missing. :huh:

 

I did this job now ..while access (without the outer front wings on) was good, and because I needed to order-in the rubber sheet - so needed to know what size, and also whether a flat sheet would conform well enough around this awkward shape yet still clear the tyre on full lock.

 

I've also measured the car's interior floor, and ordered sound deadening material. 5 sq2  was not cheap but clearly I believe it's worth it  :P 

 

Thereafter the next task was to finish de-tangling the under dashboard wiring and start to put things back together again. . 

Fusebox wedgies P1240797s.jpg

^ hand crafted Fuse-box wedgies  ..with velcro (..oowh !)   :rolleyes:

 

Ami Super Fuse box  P1240799s.jpg

^ Fuse boxes now relocated inside and attached on Velcro, just inside the driver's door. 

In both fuse boxes :  Green & Red @ 10amp, with Blue & Yellow @ 16amp.

 

NB. on 20th April.,  I wrote :

"..different sizes and colour".   Yes.. yellow wires are thicker than the grey, and green wires are of a smaller size.  Perhaps in French - the wire's colour simply represent its electrical load capacity. 

Surely any grey & green wire going into the fuse box, which is then rated with the 16amp fuse, negates this argument ?  :wacko:

 

Anyway, the wedgie blocks give space for the wires to run behind, and also offers a better angle for fuse inspection. Self adhesive Velcro tape attaches the fuse box to its wedgie, and also the wedgie to the anti-drumming pad on the bulkhead. The holes through the steering column's steelwork use a wrap of inner-tube to avoid chafe.

 

The regulator was also moved inside . .

P1240801as.jpg

^ regulator remounted to behind the heater controls, with its bracket screwed onto the plastic screen vent.  Originally the regulator was clipped onto the end of the battery, but that of course necessitated a specific type of battery (always more expensive than a generic one), and its wires dangling across the engine bay.  When I bought this car the regulator was just laying loose on the bulkhead.  :roll:

 

The two wires laying on the RH parcel shelf are for the heater blower and the screen wash. Simply for tidiness - I'm running the wires across inside the car, before going through the bulkhead, rather than through the engine bay.

 

And so reassembly could continue.

P1240803s.jpg

 

Bfg B)

15,775 views


  • pompei, Asimo and RayMK like this

 ...its a bloody motor car  ..not a Fabergé egg. !

.

< Here > is a link to my former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website.

And the story of my buying & now restoring a  1974 Yugoslavian Ami-Super  is < Here >

.


#405 OFFLINE   Bfg

Bfg

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationWesterfield, Suffolk, England, UK
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 14 May 2017 - 04:52 PM

.

Hello again,

 

..here I go ..about to replace another lost post.  At least I'd backed its text up in Microsoft-Word., and so just needed to copy that back here, reformat it and reload the photos.  I do wonder though if this and other threads will also get lost when Auoshite is transferred to another server / webmasters.? 

 

As you might gather I'm not very clever when it comes to computer stuff.  I gather Dave had done it before, and had back-ups (to within a couple of days prior to any of the crashes) ..but each time I lost stuff.   :?

 

NB. No criticism intended. I am in awe of  anyone who could keep a website like this together (it is really HUGE ! .. and very busy 24/7) ..in the face of technical as well as malicious happenings. 

 

BIG, BIG Thanks to Dave for his sterling work  ..and to anyone who takes it over  :-D 

 

Anyhow. I've now copied this whole thread onto a new website - because I've personally spent a huge amount of time in photographing & resizing those, writing posts, as best I can to try & explain what, why & how I'm doing whatever.  As a dyslexic - this has been no quick or easy task, but I've enjoyed sharing the ups n' downs, as well as the more technical aspects. It's often been a good conversation between contributors.. And I didn't want to risk loosing it forever ..in outer cyberspace.  

 

The link to the copy is within my signature at the bottom of each of my posts. 

 

While copying it across - I reduced the number of scrolls-down per page. So instead of there being 14 Autoshite pages (to date) to this thread  ..they cover 48 (!) webpages in that copy. 

 

The index in its LHS border made it easier for me to find what was written at any particular time, and then of course is the search facility.  (for example :  if you wanted to find the tool that Louise2cv suggested to adjust the handbrakes.. just search 'adjuster' ).

 

NB. I'm only using Google websites because, although formatting and photo uploading aspects of it are a sod to live with, it is at least something I am familiar with how to use. 

 

I did ask forddeliveryboy if it were OK to reproduce his contributions (to which he very kindly agreed) and also suggested an alternative to google.   I tried that but got lost.. and at this time I just wanted to back things up.  Perhaps later on I might learn how to use that website's program.

 

I now ask - any of you who have made contributions or comment - if it's OK for me to have copied your words of encouragement and suggestions.???

 

I have consciously NOT copied any link to contributors though. Instead I hand typed each of those names ..so as to (best I might) protect each of your identities. Only the photos and any links you provided are linked back via this website.  

 

IF HOWEVER YOU WANT ME TO REMOVE (from my copy) YOUR AUTOSHITE NAME or ANYTHING YOU'VE POSTED IN THIS THREAD THEN PLEASE  P.M. ME.  

 

..I certainly do not wish to upset any of you.  I have been, and am, so very glad of each and every bit of your support. B)

 

Anyway,  I've just copied this ' Yugoslavian Ami '  and my old Sunbeam motorcycle restoration threads.  Please let me know if you have a problem with it. 

 

Thank you and my Best regards,

 

Bfg.

- - -


 ...its a bloody motor car  ..not a Fabergé egg. !

.

< Here > is a link to my former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website.

And the story of my buying & now restoring a  1974 Yugoslavian Ami-Super  is < Here >

.


#406 OFFLINE   Bfg

Bfg

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationWesterfield, Suffolk, England, UK
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 14 May 2017 - 04:57 PM

.

 

08 May .. Back to mechanical work today.

 

Again another job which I needed to address while access was good. .

 

P1240806as.jpg

 

..mind you the other side where I have the inner wing fitted was less than convenient. .

 
P1240811a.jpg

^ ..so to get to this side it was a matter of laying down and reaching around the back of the wheel. 

At least I don't yet have the outer front wing on, nor the rubber mud flaps I'm proposing to fit.!

 

Yes tracking.. adjustment of track rod ends.. It's a job I don't recall ever doing before myself.  It's just something a running car gets done in the garage.  I now know why ! Needless to say when I suggest to friends that I've spent hours in the gymnasium (aka the garage) they have a good idea of what I mean..  I couldn't hazard a guess how many times I got up & down and otherwise bent arse over tit to do this job..  Result never seems to be fitness though, only aches !

 

Anyways up, having never done the job before (on a four wheeled vehicle) - I had to read the manual   ..and of course found discrepancies. .

 

Ami Super tracking P1240805as.jpg

^ Peter Russek's handbook -v- Revue Technique (in French), showing d2 being measured from different places.  Peter Russek's I thought was illogical so I double checked and yes the French book makes much more sense.   Never mind eh !?

 

So, the result of my investigation was that the tracking in both books says : Toe-in of 1 - 3mm.  I understand the Shitreon 2cv, Dyane, etc have their steering set with Toe-out.  But when I drove to the MOT station (way back when) this car's steering was terrible (and I'm using a very polite word here) !  The car would go in one direction until corrected then head off in another ..somewhat like tacking a sailing boat up-wind.. but at 50mph with oncoming cars on country roads ..with a white knuckled MOT inspector in the RHS passenger seat

 

It was fun but really not at all safe in an unknown car.

 

So how does one check and adjust the tracking ?   On motorcycles with rear chain adjusters on either side of the swinging arm it's common practice to use a straight edge or string between the front and rear wheels.   Not knowing better I used that technique here, 'cept I didn't have a straight edge long enough, and I needed to do both sides of the car at once.

 

..discarded in the marina's skip /dumpster were off-cuts of cord, which I happened to pick out a couple of months ago . .

 
P1240807s.jpg

^ tied to the front, around the tyre, and block to clear the dished centre of the wheel, and then off to the back of the car . .

 

P1240808as.jpg

^ around another block, around the tyre to an bundy elastic .. Thereafter to another piece of cord around the other back wheel, block and forward. And again tied to the front of the car.  The elastic tensioning it all ..to hold blocks in place and to keep the cord straight.

 

You might have noted the front tyres parked on pieces of card. These were my lower friction swivels so that I might more easily turn the steering.   And the keen observer might also have noted the blocks holding the cord clear of the front and rear wheels were of different thicknesses.  Yep., the Ami 8 and Ami super, and most likely the Ami 6 and one or two of the A-series vans have a narrower track at the rear than at the front (presumably to get the tyres under the mudguards) ..I know but that's Shitreon for you.  The difference for the Ami is is 40mm ..so I found 18mm thick blocks for the front wheels and 38mm thick for the rear.

 

Then all I needed to do was to measure very carefully the distance between the cord and the wheel leading and trailing rim (of the front wheels). Turning the steering to get both wheels straight ahead ..and then adjust the tie rods until the difference was between 1 & 3mm.  Btw., Toe-in is overall ie., for both wheels, so that means just 1/2  to 1-1/2 mm difference on either side of the car.  ..hence measurements needing to be accurate, and the cord(s) nicely tensioned.

 

P1240810s.jpg

^ checking the distance between the cord and the wheel's leading rim with the depth pin of a vernier gauge, so that dimension could be compared with the same wheel's string to trailing rim.

 

For a Toe-in of 2mm - I needed the dimension at the trialing rim to be 1mm less than that measured at the leading rim.

 

Of course me being me I wanted to first check what Janez had set it up to. ?  That measured 16mm Toe-out.  Perhaps in future the car will hold its line on the road now. 

 

Anyway, another job ticked off.. 

 

..And now I have to remove at least one suspension damper and to check all the others. Because when under the car, measuring up for the front mud flap, I noticed the front-right damper's rubber-bush mounting was very loose..

 

Isn't life a joy when you pay others to do a job for you. :roll:

 

Bfg. 

 

405 replies

15,926 views


  • Asimo likes this

 ...its a bloody motor car  ..not a Fabergé egg. !

.

< Here > is a link to my former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website.

And the story of my buying & now restoring a  1974 Yugoslavian Ami-Super  is < Here >

.


#407 OFFLINE   dollywobbler

dollywobbler

    Mr HubNut

  • Full Members
  • 24,104 posts
  • 26 thanks
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 14 May 2017 - 05:25 PM

Hmmm. The New Way sadly doesn't seem to maintain picture links...

 

Nice to watch this stepping ever closer to a start of being finished though!


1972 Invacar Model 70, 1973 AC Model 70

1986 Citroen 2CV6, 1995 Lexus LS400
1997 Honda S-MX, 2001 Perodua Nippa
HubNut Blog      HubNut Vids    Twatter


Thanked by 1 Member:
Bfg

#408 OFFLINE   Bfg

Bfg

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationWesterfield, Suffolk, England, UK
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 14 May 2017 - 05:33 PM

.

^ No I tried to use the photos directly off the goggle website but that didn't work, so I've had to reload each manually again..

 

hey ho I'm tired of computershite.

 

Otherwise thanks for your encouragement..  I noticed while rewriting ' dollywobbler '  so many times in the copy.. just how many times you've been here to support and offer useful advice..  Thank you.  


 ...its a bloody motor car  ..not a Fabergé egg. !

.

< Here > is a link to my former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website.

And the story of my buying & now restoring a  1974 Yugoslavian Ami-Super  is < Here >

.


#409 ONLINE   spartacus

spartacus

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 10 thanks
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 14 May 2017 - 06:48 PM

Bfg, I'm guessing a lot of people are like me and look without commenting, although I'm sure that they're all amazed by the amount of dedication and effort you're putting in, keep it up.

Thanked by 1 Member:
Bfg

#410 OFFLINE   Bfg

Bfg

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationWesterfield, Suffolk, England, UK
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 15 May 2017 - 08:21 PM

.

Thank you both / all  ;)  I appreciate your support.

 

in furtherance of..

 

08 May ..    " ..when under the car, measuring for the mud flap, I noticed the front-right damper's rubber-bush mounting was very loose..  "

 

so . .

P1240813as.jpg

^ The offending damper where the front-end rubber bush was clearly shot..  Unfortunately to get the damper off  - its mounting plate on the suspension arm had also to be released, which in turn meant that the anti-roll bar also had to be removed. 

 

Upon dismantling I noted the care and attention of copper slip inbetween the rubber and the spacer tube, and again between the rubber and the damper's end tube.!  Checking the ends of others, if found them to be loose too. .

 

Ami super suspension dampers P1240827s.jpg

^ after being recommissioned, one of the four was still intact.  NB. The torn-out rubbers were in just one end of each damper.

 

This was very likely because the damper mountings were at some time done up tight while the arms were hanging down.  ie. when the car was jacked up / raised off its tyres, and so easier to reach.

 

With these Citroens, when the car is jacked up - their suspension arms rotate / swing down through 30 or more degrees. If / when the dampers' rubber-mounting-bush's are then bolted-up tight - then their middle tubes are clamped to the -30 deg angle of the arm (even though the damper itself lays almost horizontal).  As the car is lowered - the suspension arms rotate to near horizontal. 

 

The dampers have remained horizontal, but the clamped-tight middle tubes have rotated + 30 degrees, so the rubber bushes within the (swing arm end) mountings are now in rotational shear.  The situation is worsened as the car and its suspension is used ..because the arms swing / their mounts are rotated even further upwards. This shears the rubber bushes until they can stand it no more ..and they tear out. 

 

The book (as well as 'common sense') clearly states to do them up - only when the car is sitting normally / resting on it's suspension  ..but what man ever reads the instructions !?   Instructions are for idiots.. "I'm not a ijiot" he proudly proclaims to himself  "so I'll not read it"  ..instead I'll bollocks-up whatever I work on.

 

NB. The above photo also shows a big thick washer between the end plate and the damper mounting (rubber). This should not be there..  No washer was specified for this location, and unless the axle or chassis mounting are out of true (necessitating a spacer to straighten the damper) ..then it ought not be there.  

 

..in any case it was also fitted inside-out, insomuch as those washers have a recess in one face, which is specifically to clear any weld on the damper's chassis mounting stud.  Because this one was fitted inside-out - that recess was where the middle tube is ..and so the rubber in the mount was clamped rather than the steel tube..  How then can the rubber flex, as it should when the suspension swings ?  No, the flat side of those washers must always face the damper mounting.

 

P1240835s.jpg

^  oow look it's see through ..but not in a sexy sort of way.

 

P1240838s.jpg

^ all cleaned up and degreased.

 

Why ?  shirley you not going to ?

 

Didn't I tell you not to call me Shirley ..even after last weekend.. ! ?

 

Yes, I did look into buying new ones ..and they are available pretty much off the shelf. The same part number is in fact (most oddly !) used on Shitroen's A-series Mahari (a mucho lighter-weight corrugated plastic bodied 'thing'), and also on a Peugeot..  But this is Autoshite ..and I've already blown my budget.  I also have, I suspect, something that will do the job of re-bonding these together again.  

 

NB. The dampers themselves are working fine ..although a weak one was put on the rear on whereas the front is rated as a lighter damping action. So the car had the lighter dampers on opposite corners rather than both to the rear.  ..Just another job that's easy enough to correct.

 

P1240840s.jpg

 

P1240845s.jpg

^ this is a job you might want to wear disposable gloves for !

 

P1240848s.jpg

^ Plastic sheet held tight behind to stop the goo from just pushing through.

 

P1240856as.jpg

^ all nicely smoothed off.  and left in the car (parked in the sun) to cure.  NB. the goo doesn't stick to a wet finger (or the finger of a wetted rubber glove) ..so a bit of saliva is necessary to do this. 

 

P1240859s.jpg

^ As it happens, I also don't like rusty nuts and bent-to-buggery washers ..so they were cleaned up, washers flattened and their edges deburred ..ready for a coat of zinc paint.  When well cured the rubber bush holes were cleaned out, and the rubber mastic trimmed level with the end of the tubes ..tapered to the outside ..so that the rubber doesn't contact when fitted (only the middle tube is clamped). 

 

P1240850a.jpg

^ after just 25 miles and otherwise being in the garage ..it doesn't look new under there. 

 

P1240873s.jpg

^ underside of the floors given a coat of two pack..  though disappointingly I'll need to revisit yet again to seam seal panel / outrigger gaps.  The dampers also received another coat of paint before refitting  (as you can see - the mastic rebonding is now near invisible) ..Likewise components of the anti-roll bar's end plate were tidied up before being correctly adjusted and spaced, during reassembly.

 

Note : At this conjuncture - the dampers are not bolted tight because I'll need to refit the front of the car, the battery, spare wheel, etc., and then set the ride height correctly - before I can do that. 

 

There are other bits I've done, but I'm sure that's a lengthy enough post for today.

 

(very nearly) another job ticked off ..

 

Bfg  B) 


  • Asimo likes this

 ...its a bloody motor car  ..not a Fabergé egg. !

.

< Here > is a link to my former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website.

And the story of my buying & now restoring a  1974 Yugoslavian Ami-Super  is < Here >

.


#411 OFFLINE   Bfg

Bfg

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationWesterfield, Suffolk, England, UK
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 16 May 2017 - 07:14 PM

.

part of yesterday's reassembly of the front dampers and anti-roll bar task was to correct this . .

 

P1240860as.jpg

^ on the LHS, the front suspension arm was rubbing on the new bulkhead panel. 

 

Obviously needed correcting, which was a task much easier said than done with such limited access, but with an old wood chisel, blocks of wood and an old tyre lever, oh and did I mention the mechanic's mate !? (a hammer)  ..job was done and the paint reapplied. . .

 

P1240863as.jpg

 ^ ..the shadow next to the swinging arm's bolt hole gives you an idea. It was 1mm closing to -1 as the suspension swang. Now its 6mm or more and clear.  So.., another little job ticked off. :)

 

Tip :  I needed a very narrow, but not necessarily a tiny brush, to reach into tight space between the suspension arm and bulkhead..  I found that a (kitchen's) pastry brush (long natural hair bristles) did an excellent job.. 

 

I'll need to do similar adjustments* with the exhaust cross-box, under the gearbox, sometime soon. Presently it is in communicado with the chassis.

 

Another little correction was to make these . .

P1240871as.jpg

^ the two spacer-plates are for between the anti-roll bar and the axle end-plate. The anti-roll bar is simply a torsional spring, and as such should not be under very much longitudinal compression.  As specified (in the manual) ..before tightening up - there should be 0.5mm between the flat of the P-clamp and the end-plate. On this car it was closer to 4mm, so I cut these 'spacers' to correct it.  

 

Sod.. I just remembered.. I haven't checked the rear anti-roll bar yet.

 

 

Moving on.. For today, I enjoyed the hot sunny weather to work outside and get on with the front left wing (the one I'd previously panel beaten).. Unfortunately I had a little problem getting it and the front (grille) panel to fit well together ..nothing to do with my panel beating, it was just that its top mounting hole needed a little filing . .

 

P1240874s.jpg

^ this top hole misalignment prevented the wing from fitting where its outline suggested it should be. I filed it out (about 4mm) which gave the result I was after. .

 

P1240876s.jpg

 

Thereafter the panel was treated to a little more prep, before declaring  " enough ! " and giving it a first coat of the  paint.  NB. the inside of this panel had been painted some time ago - but this was the first coat of two-pack on its outside. .

 

P1240882s.jpg

^ I'm not overly worried about the paint's finish at the moment, but I was keen to see this panel move closer to being ready to refit ..and into one colour and with the metal sealed.  And while I had the paint out - I applied a quick coat (using the mixed paint up) to one of the grp rear wings. 

 

It's been a day when nothing seems to have gone smoothly., but as of this evening it's satisfying to know the first panels are in paint  :)

 

Bfg 

16,087 views


  • Asimo likes this

 ...its a bloody motor car  ..not a Fabergé egg. !

.

< Here > is a link to my former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website.

And the story of my buying & now restoring a  1974 Yugoslavian Ami-Super  is < Here >

.


#412 OFFLINE   stuboy

stuboy

    Rank: Renault 16

  • Full Members
  • 3,329 posts
  • 6 thanks
  • Locationashford kent

Posted 17 May 2017 - 06:16 AM

Coming on well

END of the road for the  MONTURDO !! :-(  :-(  :-(  

Long live fozzie the Focus  :wub:  :wub:  :wub:   


Thanked by 1 Member:
Bfg

#413 OFFLINE   dollywobbler

dollywobbler

    Mr HubNut

  • Full Members
  • 24,104 posts
  • 26 thanks
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 17 May 2017 - 09:07 AM

I'm a little confused by the text. It seemed to suggest that dampers were being swapped (or had been) between front and rear. That's not a good idea, as there is more suspension travel on the rear, so the damper is longer. Oh, and put copper grease on the pins before refitting the dampers. Those metal bushes nearly always seize themselves to the pins otherwise...


1972 Invacar Model 70, 1973 AC Model 70

1986 Citroen 2CV6, 1995 Lexus LS400
1997 Honda S-MX, 2001 Perodua Nippa
HubNut Blog      HubNut Vids    Twatter


#414 OFFLINE   Bfg

Bfg

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationWesterfield, Suffolk, England, UK
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 17 May 2017 - 05:48 PM

.

I'm a little confused by the text. It seemed to suggest that dampers were being swapped (or had been) between front and rear. That's not a good idea, as there is more suspension travel on the rear, so the damper is longer. Oh, and put copper grease on the pins before refitting the dampers. Those metal bushes nearly always seize themselves to the pins otherwise...

 

Not so confused.. that is what I said, Unfortunately one of the rear dampers had been fitted to the front-left of the car, and the other rear damper was on the rear-right hand side.  As previously stated they do have different rates of damping.

 

It hadn't registered with me that the dampers were of different lengths. Now that you mention it I did know that the front suspension link arms are shorter than the back ones, on the A-series, but somewhere over the past 30 years I seem to have forgotten that. So, thank you..  

 

I just popped out to the garage and checked the static length between damper mounts (with the car on the level).  The distance is approximately (tape measured) 385mm for the front damper and 425mm for the rear.  This is without the front body panels on the car, so that 385mm front measurement will probably settle to around about 390mm between studs. Which gives a difference of about 35mm between static lengths front and back. 

 

I had said before that I was a little confused that the same (after-market part number) dampers was used with the light-weight Mahari .  In fact it's only the rear dampers that are common between these vehicles (also the Ami Super Break + the Acadiane) .. which makes a whole lot more sense as the back end of the Ami is not at all heavy  (..I can slide it sideways in the garage on my own), and of course they are each four seaters. 

 

Yes thank you, I cleaned out the the holes and pre-checked the dampers slid freely onto their studs, and then applied copper-slip both in the holes (using a screwdriver to wipe it all around) and a smear on each stud. 

 

 

Disbelief, disappointment (again)., and my job list is further extended as I bent down to checked those dimensions.  The car's steering happened to be on lock and I saw this . .

 

P1240883as.jpg

 

^ It's particularly galling because I had supplied Janez with three new gaiters. I had bought these of Chevtronics, but they didn't have the fourth one, which I thought was OK  because on the one they didn't have - was the same as for the 2cv.  2cvKeza are A-series specialists so surely somethey would hold in stock.  On the Ami super, only the inner gaiter are different ..to suit the GS gearbox and f.brakes. Janez was asked to change these while the engine was out and the driveshafts were removed.  None have been changed but they have been re-greased. 

 

It's mid-May and I'm really trying to get this car together.. I'm not looking to find yet another job which needs doing..  I'm so annoyed ..even that I cannot express profanities.  It's very upsetting  :( 


  • Asimo likes this

 ...its a bloody motor car  ..not a Fabergé egg. !

.

< Here > is a link to my former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website.

And the story of my buying & now restoring a  1974 Yugoslavian Ami-Super  is < Here >

.


#415 OFFLINE   Bfg

Bfg

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationWesterfield, Suffolk, England, UK
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 18 May 2017 - 07:30 PM

.

.

part of yesterday's reassembly of the front dampers and anti-roll bar task was to correct this . .  on the LHS, the front suspension arm was rubbing on the new bulkhead panel. 

 

I'll need to do similar adjustments with the exhaust cross-box, under the gearbox, sometime soon. Presently it is in communicado with the chassis.

 

I tackled this 'it'll just take five minutes' job this afternoon. 

 

P1240903as.jpg

^ The yellow piece of card wouldn't go inbetween the exhaust first silencer box and the steering rack / axle.

 

The exhaust silencer is bolted to the back / underside of the gearbox, which with the engine is rubber mounted ..so moves ..whereby a little tolerance is called for.   I'd also noted when down under the car that the exhaust pipes leading to this silencer box were also darn close to the underside of a chassis cross member.  I hadn't realised just how close. .

 

P1240904s.jpg

^ The shiny patch seen on each of the two forward pipes are where they have been (recently) vibrating / rubbing against the cross member. 

 

This was the silencer's mounting before being removed . .

P1240902s.jpg

^ I don't have a parts book, nor exploded diagram of how this should have been assembled - but certainly the squidgy piece of rubber, under this mount, wasn't doing anything useful.  If at all - the rubber should be between the gearbox bracket and the silencer bracket.  So this is what I did . .

 

P1240911as.jpg

 ^ I cut and drilled a square of reinforced rubber, 8mm thick, which will sandwich between the gearbox and the silencer.  This spacer lowers the silencer. The bracket on the gearbox is a fork, so the fastening can be pre-assembled before being slid on its bracket.

 

Yes, I cleaned the surface rust off and gave it a quick clean with hydrochloric acid, before giving it a coat of zinc (cold galvanizing) paint.  It doesn't take long to do, the paint dries while I'm busy with something else, and in the long term it ought to be cheaper than letting this (unique to the 1970's Ami-super) silencer rot away.  I can't help it rotting internally but anyway ..

p.s. I've not used this brand before but I've just bought 2x 400ml cans @ £5.33 = free delivery < toolstation >

 

P1240914as.jpg

^ so I end up with a clearance under the cross beam, where there wasn't even enough gap to get a piece of paper, let alone a piece of card inbetween (..it's the same gap on each side).  And . .

 

P1240912as.jpg

^ This now has loose clearance for a piece of 6mm wood (only placed there to illustrate the gap). 

 

That ought to tick another job off the list. B)

 

Oh BTW.. unlike the lack of washers fitted to these ; the exhaust clamps should have a rectangular (not square section) lock washer under each nut, with none under the bolt head. The shape of these clamps will tend to lock the bolt head, whereas the lock washer will raise the nut clear of the clamp ..so it may be tightened.  

 

NB. Rusted fastenings : Are a sod to get undone, sometimes they break (so you're missing it when putting thing back together) or it stress weakens.  Rust erodes nut / bolt head's size.. so they're a little looser on your spanner, which then tend to slip = rounded off nut &/or busted knuckle.!   Rusty fastenings are not part of the fun.  Prevention  is a lifestyle choice which costs almost nuffink all !   ..which if you are keeping a vehicle for any length of time - makes working on it more enjoyable (..or less of a hassle dependent on how you see things). 

 

So, on these exhaust clamps, and their nut n' bolts I cleaned them up on the wire wheel (cleans out the threads very nicely), laid them out on a piece of card and gave them a coat of zinc (cold galvanising). when dry and for refitting, I then smear copper-slip along the whole length of these (and many other) bolt's thread & shank (wherever used on my cars or motorcycles, even when they go into a hole) as a barrier against corrosion. 

 

On the 1950's Sunbeam motorcycles I also live with, many of their nuts & bolts were painted over to prevent rust.. after assembly.  This not only looked much nicer on a quality machine, but also made life easier in the longer term.  This after-assembly painting-over included the cylinder head bolts, which on these air cooled engines show between the cooling fins.

 

 

Back to the Shitroen ...   And the clamps should not hang down below the chassis, for fear of snagging and tearing at the exhaust system.

 

And, and.., the pipes mating flanges are best cleaned back to bare metal and given a liberal coating of copper-slip, so that when clamped - they slide into one another and seal tightly ..rather than biding and leaving gaps.  No exhaust goo is required. These clamps had been put together dry and didn't seal very well at all.

 

That's all for tonight.. So it's a good night from me ..and ..

. .

.

 

600full-the-morecambe--wise-show-photo_4

16,225 views


  • Asimo likes this

 ...its a bloody motor car  ..not a Fabergé egg. !

.

< Here > is a link to my former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website.

And the story of my buying & now restoring a  1974 Yugoslavian Ami-Super  is < Here >

.


#416 ONLINE   beko1987

beko1987

    Shonky old Citroen

  • Full Members
  • 11,595 posts
  • 28 thanks
  • LocationThame, Oxon

Posted 18 May 2017 - 08:01 PM

Wow! I'm in massive awe of this!

2005 Gooner2 2.2dci Auto ex taxi (apparently) (Ex Kiltox)

2008 orl Vauxhalls r Shit Zafira 1.8 SRI 140 (Hers)
 


Thanked by 1 Member:
Bfg

#417 ONLINE   spartacus

spartacus

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 10 thanks
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 19 May 2017 - 11:04 PM

Even typing those updates gets a thumbs up from me, good effort!

Thanked by 1 Member:
Bfg

#418 OFFLINE   Bfg

Bfg

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationWesterfield, Suffolk, England, UK
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 22 May 2017 - 08:23 PM

.

Thank you both.. I'm doing my best, although sometimes I seem to have as many thumbs as fingers ! :-D

 

In the meantime I've had a couple of days off.. you know grocery shopping and gardening. 10 years ago I planted flowering bushes against the front of the house, and have let them nicely over grow in cottage style. But the house is very old and now its plaster rendering is crumbling, so that is scheduled and my lovely bushes had to be dug out  :-( (..which totally knackered this old giffer but at least my tennis elbow didn't give me gip 8) ).

 

I also decided that I really need to tidy up my tent-come-overflow garage / store.   A few years ago, when I put it up - it looked like this..

P1160691b.jpg

^ which was a good idea at the time.  A family sized tent with sewn in groundsheet, being sold at a hefty discount because it had been used once (second hand) and then was a two years previous model. 

 

However, I couldn't afford to own an old Jag  ..neither could I afford the time needed to bring it back to a condition that I could keep on top of.  So reality dictated - that it had to go.  And the tent (God bless Kampa.co.uk) seriously UV disintegrated and ripped apart after just 7 months of all weather. So I put a white tarp over the top and the (now) polytunnel became a store for all the bits previously in the garage, which needed to be moved when I put the Ami in there to work on it. And then bits of Ami as it was dismantled.

 

Disgracefully, over the passed few months it came to look like . .

P1250003s.jpg

 

So to cut a long (..and heavy rain showery when everything was outside) story short, it now looks like . .

P1250029s.jpg

 

Again a massive expenditure of energy, but it needed to be done.   So for today tasks, I took it relatively easy..

 

P1250010as.jpg

^ swapping my attentions now to the LHS front wing ; I first needed to address the sexy* fit between it and the front (grille) panel.

 

..And then set-to sanding (electric d.a) off the top coat of paint. And where the paint had cracked, chipped or flaked off.. to remove / feather it down to bare metal. .

P1250016s.jpg

 

Using the newly appointed < . . . extra wide . . . > workbench  (aka.. my trailer / ex-caravan chassis) . .

P1250017s.jpg

 

P1250024as.jpg

^ this side's panel was in pretty good shape. I'd already panel-beaten out its minor dents, and reworked all but the front flange, before I painted it inside. So today's task was to cut the old outside paint back to a sound base before applying fresh paint.  Here I've used very coarse sanding 240 grit paper on the da., to ensure a good key for the new paint. 

 

But rather than apply the epoxy primer, which needs a day to harden and then a fair amount of wet n' dry flattening back again ..I wanted to try a different 'primer'..  I've never done this before, but in the third photo (above) as in the one below ..this is how, at close of play today, it looks. . 

 

P1250026s.jpg

The grey is zinc, or if you prefer cold galvanizing. Commonly used by garages - where welding or scratches have exposed otherwise protected steelwork.  After 2 - 3 hours it can be painted over, so I thought I'd try it.  Cold galvanize any place I'm down to bare steel, and around the edges where the paint is cracked / been chipped off over the years. And then tomorrow see how well it has stuck and whether the two-pack will go straight over the top of it and likewise adhere well.  

 

If it does then I can use the technique on each of the doors (chipped and scratched along their bottom edges & all around their shuts, and again inside the door skins. I can also use it inside the front grille panel etc.    

. . . . . IF  it works. ! ?   . . it could save me many hours..  

 

Tomorrow we will see ;)   

 

Bfg.

16,419 views


 ...its a bloody motor car  ..not a Fabergé egg. !

.

< Here > is a link to my former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website.

And the story of my buying & now restoring a  1974 Yugoslavian Ami-Super  is < Here >

.


#419 OFFLINE   Bfg

Bfg

    Rank: Citroen Ami

  • Full Members
  • 1,049 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationWesterfield, Suffolk, England, UK
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 23 May 2017 - 05:22 PM

.

I'm glad to report ; the cold galvanizing paint appears to be sticking fine to the bare metal and the different layers of paint already on these panels.. And there's no sign of adverse chemical reaction. :rolleyes:

 

And the test of whether the 2-pack reacts or does stick well to the zinc . .

P1250030s.jpg

^ also seems to be fine. Certainly no reaction. In 48 hours time I'll see if it scrapes / peels off too easily.

 

In the meantime.. a tribute to dollywobbler's sadly missed Dyane . . B)

 

P1250034s.jpg

^ The white over the grey is stopper (fine filler). There looks to be quite a thickness on there - but it's unusually opaque, and much of it is simply refilling where the top coat of paint had to be feathered back to bare metal.  The stopper appears to be sticking well too, and the gap between the front panel and the wing is shaping up nicely :)

 

Bfg

16,468 views


 ...its a bloody motor car  ..not a Fabergé egg. !

.

< Here > is a link to my former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website.

And the story of my buying & now restoring a  1974 Yugoslavian Ami-Super  is < Here >

.


#420 ONLINE   forddeliveryboy

forddeliveryboy

    Rank: Citroën Ghia

  • Full Members
  • 7,757 posts
  • 9 thanks
  • LocationEurope
  • Country : Country Flag

Posted 23 May 2017 - 08:25 PM

Like the autoshite-priced storage/prep/spray bay, I wonder if 7 months continuous exposure to UV is about where many cheaper quality tents would start falling apart? 

 

I'll use an etch primer whererever possible, but zinc ones seem less reactive with existing paint layers. Single biggest thing with old Cits isn't to apply layers too generously, given the sharp edges and thin panels, for both longevity and appearance. 

 

Great to see more progress, this Ami will be unlike any other when finished!






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users