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Yugoslavian Ami.., continuing on from 'now-autoshites-flimsy-bodied Shitroen'


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#361 ONLINE   Bfg

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 03:11 PM

.

phew.. gusting 60mph here in Suffolk   ..it's weather to make one glad not to wear a toupée  :lol: or a kilt !  :o

 

So, having decided not to drive around with a garage wall attached to a timber - yesterday I straightened out and reinforced the top return flange.  I also extended the boot shut return (which overlaps the drain gutter) by another 1/2".   Although it's pretty close to the designed shape of the original steel panel, I might go back at some time to do the same on the LHS wing as this side now looks better, and it'll give me another screw fastening to hold the panel in shape.

 

Today having trimmed the feathered edges of yesterday's grp and refitted the top flange's attachment studs, I'm 'close enough' in panel shape (particularly down the rear door shut) to extend the rear door shut face (as I did on the LHS rear wing, from 8-10mm to 25-30mm). 

 

Ami super grp rear wing RHS  P1230733as.jpg

 

P1230736s.jpg

^ using blue masking tape again as a temporary mould, you can see here the wet laminate of the new shut face ..with this n' that blocks, pieces of card & wedges supporting it.

 

The inner web that I'd been using (cutting & shoving) to get the shape 'close enough' is seen running almost parallel beside the new web.  There's also a flange on the body's door shut (with the rear door striker plate attached to it) and that takes a rubber lip seal, which sits inbetween these two (grp webs) to keep any mud splatter from coming as far forward as the door shut.    

 

The grp is now curing, and so although just 3 o'clock I'm taking the rest of the day off .. yippee :-D 


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#362 ONLINE   Bfg

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 09:32 PM

.

not really much to show as progress recently..

 

P1230742.jpg

^ The rear wing's door shut was subsequently trimmed and this grp panel now fits very much better.. There's lots of finishing work to go yet, but before I move on with that - I wanted to address the overall panel fit of this car. 

 

An unforeseen (on my part) consequence of the structural restoration work, was that the front LHS door subsequently scraped on the front-wing's shut-return every time it was opened or closed. As previously conveyed.. in working through the adjustment of that door and wing - I realised that the LHS door apertures in the body are ¼" further forward than the RHS.  

 

More recently, while trying to get this RHS rear wing to fit - I discovered the bottoms of the doors are tighter to the sill on the RHS., with an extra ½" gap on the LHS.   And just for laughs - the rear RHS wing is ½" or more higher than the LHS  (as highlighted by the rear lights no longer being equally level with the Ami-8's chrome strip across the boot lid). 

 

P1230758 & 9s.jpg

^ This is the case whether grp or the original steel panels are fitted. To be fair, there were probably production tolerances from new anyway ..and this car had been worked on before ..but the photos of this car (as bought) didn't reflect these discrepancies. 

 

Never-the-less it is what it is.., and it needed adjusting* before I moved on with finishing the shape the rear wings.  So that's what I've been doing these last couple of days.. 

 

Having previously set up the LHS of the car as best to the door frame apertures as I could (without scraping the return shut of the front wing - by moving that forward), I have in turn now moved the RHS front wing further forward. This was necessary because the bonnet aperture was lozengered (so the grille panel's gap to the bonnet was unequal ).  Thereafter I had to close the gap between the RHS front door and the wing. So, then the rear door moved to equalise the shut gaps. At the same time I spacered the rear door out a little, and tilted both down very slightly towards the back of the car.   

 

As said in a previous post, the RHS A-post pressing / door-hinge mounting is now too high, so the vertical screw adjusters are at their very limit. And then the 'tilt' also necessitated a little bit of filing to the holes in the rear-door's striker-plate's mounting ..as it too had reached its limit of adjustment. But hey ho nothing too drastic...

P1230755a.jpg

 

Of course, I couldn't go too far with any of this because otherwise the unevenness of gap around the door's window frames then becomes too obvious.

 

Minute adjustments at the hinges makes seemingly huge changes of the gaps and at the latch. Let's just say - it's been a very slow and systematically repetitive process.   The result is not as nice and tight as it might have been, but perhaps I'm just so focused on it that I'm seeing everything more critically than others might.   Until I look again in the morning (!) ..I think I'm about as close to best compromise as I can get ..And  I did manage to drop the back edge of the back door by some 5mm :)

 

P1230757.jpg

^ The rear wing is shown still aligned to where the doors were before. So hopefully, when the rear wing is adjusted then (right back at the tail lamp) we might see a 7 or perhaps 8mm improvement to what it is now.

 

It's been a learning curve !  :shock:

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#363 OFFLINE   RayMK

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 10:13 PM

You are doing a grand job and, as you suggested, are probably being super-critical.  While it is true that some pre-restoration photos may show a better alignment for certain panels and trim on your car, I have seen nearly new Ami 8s in showrooms which have had almost comical variations in gaps and trim alignment when compared to standards of the day.  It has to be said, however, that Moskvitch and Renault, particularly with the R4, were more amusing.  And yes, I am aware that Renault, with delightful Frenchness, could not see any valid reason for having the wheelbase the same on each side.

 

I suspect that, with the extensive restoration your car required, the cost of guaranteeing factory levels of fit would be prohibitive as it requires heavy body jigs which also allow access, and also needs much more time in order to achieve such precision.  Your diligence will certainly further improve your Ami but your effort is free.  Many people will simply admire it without letting their concours genes go to town.

 

Anyway, very well done.  I hope that you will fall in love with the car and keep it.  Sod the bank manager  :-D .


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#364 ONLINE   Bfg

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 01:23 PM

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Howzat !

P1230760s.jpg

^ The boot lid's chrome strip (actually stainless) is 17.5mm top to bottom, so I'm really pleased to manage to get the top line of this side's rear lamp almost level with the lower edge of the strip too.  It took a bit more filing, re-drilling, and adjustments to make it happen, but I'm happy now to proceed with re-finishing that wing. 

 

Thanks for y'all's support ;)  


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#365 OFFLINE   forddeliveryboy

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 02:58 PM

Better panel alignment than any Ami I remember seeing! Keep up the good work.
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#366 ONLINE   Bfg

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 06:29 PM

.

first edge defining skim..

P1230764s.jpg

 

Despite my working with chronic tennis elbow - it's been decent weather so I could work part of the day with the garage door open, and seeing progress means I'm happier now. :P


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#367 ONLINE   Bfg

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Posted 04 March 2017 - 08:37 PM

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Another week ...oh no another month (!) has passed under the bridge.  :?

 

This afternoon I called a halt to my piddling around with this panel. " It's bloody close enough"  I cried out in frustration ..wiped it off and gave it a coat of epoxy primer.   I'm not a pro' and this crappy grp panel has taken far too long.. but now it's good to go.  So, time to move on.   :P

 

P1230781s.jpg

 

P1230784s.jpg

^ Ami aficionados (AKA rivet-counter, nerd or geek) might note the extra flange added along / near the top edge ..to close what on the steel panels was an 'original'  tapering 1/8 - 1/2" gap.  And again up besides the rear lamp, which follows (more or less) the line of the boot lid, to close that wildly eccentric tapering (1/4" - 3/4" !) shut gap.  The top flange I'd already added on the LH R-wing but I now need to go back to add the upright flange / boot-lid shut to the left side.

 

Ami Super RHS grp wing P1230794s.jpg

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#368 ONLINE   Bfg

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 09:27 PM

.

P1230800 (700 x 525).jpg

 

edit : picture added..

 

Ami Super P1230804as.jpg


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#369 ONLINE   Bfg

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 07:18 PM

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I've taken a few days off because my elbow is giving me jip.. but things must move on so I pulled the car out to turn it around and while at it cleaned the garage and cleared a little more working space near the door as I now want to get on with the front panels.

post-20151-0-55994000-1489015884.jpg

 

I've also tried to readjust the LHS front wing, to make it tighter to its door and to correct the line a little better ...not very successfully I might add :(

P1230839.jpg

^ This appears to have been taken before I spaced out the rear door to correct its bottom line.

 

..before pulling things apart I just wanted to do a quick mod on the front bumpers.. This (below) is as it was, with the inside of the bumper having been rubbing on the wing (negligible clearance where the arrow is, with significant paint-off scratches just out of sight below it)..

P1230852a.jpg

^ the black felt pen line marks the intended cut.

 

and this is how it looks now ...

P1230853as.jpg

^ bumper trimmed off to the aforementioned black-felt-pen line, so as to not scratch the wing's paint off again., and imo looking more elegant. 8)

 

P1230855.jpg

I've also rounded its front edge corners (under the grille) to make it look deliberate (rather than they just being cropped off square).  And then spent 15 minutes with the polisher to get rid of 40+ years of surface scratches. Thankfully these bumpers are stainless, so there was no chrome to polish through or otherwise to get pitted. 

 

Isn't it strange how a cheap car can have ss bumpers and headlamp surrounds, whereas others use plated ferrous steel.?

 

Bfg ;)

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#370 ONLINE   Bfg

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 07:32 PM

.

P1230858.jpg

^ I've just got to do something about those cables sometime. !  :angry:

 

P1230866.jpg

^ Autoshiter's tools for panel beating and correcting buggered flanges (NB. the adjustable spanner is not being used to undo nut & bolts !).   The outer-edge flange (where a lip seal held water) is a little perforated., but generally speaking the panel is in really good condition..

 

P1230869.jpg

^ trued all the edges ..and with surface rust removed it's looking much better  ..but I've never known such flimsy panels on a car before.. And this panel also carries the spare wheel :shock:    It's absolutely astounding that these inner wheel-arches hadn't completely dissolved years ago  ..weird ! 

 

Note to self : anti-drumming / acoustic pads will be required !

 

P1230872a.jpg

^ I pulled a jam-jar of hydrochloric acid out from the back of the shed ..and its metal lid had completely dissolved :lol: 

 

P1230874.jpg

^ acid brushed on and being left for an hour ..before rinsing off and drying.

..wonderful stuff !


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#371 ONLINE   Bfg

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 04:03 PM

.

..not much achieved this week as I sorta got volunteered to help fix a friend's Sunbeam.  Electrical faults caused by mechanics hating to do electrics so using the cheapest connections they can possibly buy, and even then hastily bodging the job..  one fault lead to the next and so it went on. Can't complain as the lady owner (former client) was fantastic when I started that business. 

 

Sunbeam S8 P1230889as.jpg

 

Doing that and progress since has not been helped by the ol' tennis elbow giving me jip. Work stopped today after getting the last of (a little) fibreglassing done ..Now I'll just to rest the elbow and even pick up my tea cup with my left hand  :P 

 

..anyways up onwards and upwards, or rather backwards and down under as occasionally happens :wacko: ..and we're back to..

P1240024a.jpg

 

As per the last post.. the inner front wings are the object of my attention.  I need to get them repainted before the car can be used (for fear of them dissolving into rust dust).  So I've now removed and reinforced the outer & rear flange of each.. 

 

the problem with each side was this..

P1240009as.jpg

^ the outer edge (where the rubber seal clipped on held moisture) was perforated and in places cracked. 

 

P1240014as.jpg

^ the cracks I welded to restore the essence of structure along those edges, and in this one short piece where the flange had all but completely rusted away, I inset a repair strip (..reclaimed parcel shelf for those who remember my cutting it out).  It's not at all easy to weld such thin rusted metal when  a.) I'm really not that good a welder, and b.) the equipment I got is a cheap home-quality mig.  Nevertheless to say it's now strong enough to hold its shape, especially considering what I was about to do next... I reasoned that the inner wings' outside and rear flanges need a little help... 

 

P1230893as.jpg

 

P1230892as.jpg

^ rather than bit by bit trying to rebuild the frayed, perforated edge of the flange with weld and repair strips - I've fibreglass encapsulated it.  After thorough cleaning it up, I used a smear of U-Pol B fibreglass bridging paste on both sides of the metal (..that stuff sticks really well, even to steel), and then glass-fibred over that (again on both inside & outside). The flange's filigreed edge made an excellent key for the fibreglass!  

 

and once trimmed..

P1230895as.jpg

^  ..it is half as deep again as it was, and being thicker will not buckle or crack easily.  Once painted - the moisture will be sealed out. And with the flange being deeper - I can now use self-adhesive neoprene strip between the inner and outer wings, rather than the metal-cored clip-on seal.   

 

In places like this (below) it's just a mud trap waiting to rot through again ..

P1230899as.jpg

^ that top back corner overlaps the bulkhead shelf, and in doing so creates a mud trap which Janez had to repair (on both sides of the bulkhead).  To resolve that I'll make and fit a rubber flap to keep the mud out.  I'll also drill a hole through the back corner into the engine bay so hot air hereafter dries any moisture in that corner. 

 

..so that was about it for the whole week..  It didn't take long but with bike and elbow that was enough.   Both sides are now done although the RHS still needed trimming. Once the steel is cleaned up one final time I can paint them now. ;)

 

oh., and while I had the grp out again, I did add a flange to lessen the boot-lid's shut gap on the LHS wing, to match what I'd done on the RHS. \/

P1230891s.jpg

 

Have a good weekend

Bfg :)

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#372 ONLINE   Bfg

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 06:41 PM

.

One month later..  and time to do a little catching up..

 

With tennis-elbow stopping play last month ..I redirected my attention to restoring my Sunbeam S7 motorcycle.  But over the past weeks I learnt that hydrochloric-acid cleaning of rust off a panel needs to be done and then painted - in a single schedule of work.

 

The lesson I learnt here was ; to do the rust treatment / cleaning surface rust off the panel on one dry day, immediately dry it with clean cloth, and then store those panels in a warm dry place (in my lounge) overnight (to dry out any damp in the panel's seams). And the following day, after the sun has warmed the morning air - get on and paint those panels. Otherwise they will rust again (..even in the garage during a spell of dry weather) ..and you have to do it all again !

 

I had understood that Jenolite (which uses hydrochloric-acid as its main ingredient) was supposed to make the metal inert so as to not rust easily again. Apparently raw hydrochloric-acid doesn't do that.   Anyways up..

 

Having likewise weld-repaired and rebuilt the front RH side inner wing's edge flange, and encasing that in fibreglass, I've now cleaned off their surface rust and painted them inside and out with epoxy primer.  And then yesterday with 2-pack polyurethane paint by Hempel.  This is the paint I used when hand-repainting the deck of my fibreglass boat, and I'm happy with how it works (painting with it), how it looks when dry, and its durability.

 

P1240202s.jpg

^ epoxy primer undercoat going on. I've decided that I cannot afford the time to get a smooth finish on the inside panels and so I'm going to try and leave a deliberate mottle finish on them ..with a 2" fine hair roller (in corners I use a brush to scrub the paint in).

 

 

Time consuming work was also required on the front wings and the headlamp/grille panel ...

P1240415s.jpg

^ the outer front RH side wing had clearly been the subject of a fender bender. Most of the dent had been beaten out and then filled over.  Still for a 40+ year old car's front wing it really is in solid condition.  And in fact someone had done a pretty good job of reshaping the panel .. very much better than a block of wood or chicken wire with bondo over it.

 

P1240419s.jpg

^ filled over and painted.

 

P1240432s.jpg

^ in the process of the paint being chemically stripped, and of course also the filler.

 

P1240438s.jpg

^ sodding filler took three applications of paint stripper even after the paint was off.   It had to come off though, as I wanted to try and get a better shape.. And you can't (successfully) panel-beat a panel which has bondo in it.

 

P1240439s.jpg

^ finally !  Here I'm already starting to reduce the high lumps, with hammer and dolly. It'll take a time but it's the best I know how to do.

 

P1240464s.jpg

^ It doesn't look that different I know (..not least because I've deliberately taken the photo to show the surface !) but I've reduced the dents from 1/4" or more to less than half that.

 

P1240469s.jpg

^ no filler, just a coat of epoxy primer.

 

P1240512as.jpg

^ coarse rub down with 240 grit.

 

Next.. required a bit of work with the welder, as the return flanges of this front wing were cracked in two places and buckled in others (so back to hammer and dolly).  Likewise the car's front (grille) panel.

 

P1240516as.jpg

^ work in progress

 

P1240519s.jpg

^ This was dented / buckled straight in perhaps 1/2" but very locally. The grille was undamaged so either it's been replaced or we were lucky.  Above I've straightening it perhaps half way.. another 1/4" to go I'd guess.

 

There were so many dents, cracks, bend and otherwise buckled edges, that I can't show even a small percentage of them, but each have / are being addressed with welded repair and hammer n' dolly as required..   Until . . .

 

P1240524as.jpg

^ shaped without any filler (..yet)

 

P1240531as.jpg

 

And of course, the insides of both front wings and the inner panels have now been painted in the 2-pack polyurethane . . .

P1240535as.jpg

 

So not a great deal of progress for a whole month, but then as I say I have been doing other things too.  :)

 

Hope that is of interest,

 

Bfg. ;)

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#373 OFFLINE   500tops

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 08:00 PM

Great to see further (quality) progress. I love this thread!

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#374 ONLINE   Bfg

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 09:37 PM

.

^  Big Thanks :)

 

And now you might well ask.. What the xxx* is he up to now ?  :o 

 

Ami Super - P1240566as.jpg

^ with even the sound deadening removed ? :wacko:

 

..the answer lies somewhere here . . .

P1230859s.jpg

^ Never seen such a rats nest of cables in my life. And this is much tidier than when I bought the car. 

 

If you've ever had reason to grumble about Lucas electrics, then I'd strongly recommend you never get this close to Citroen's wiring.  Logic can only be presumed to be found near the bottom of a carafe of deep red wine, as it really begs belief that a Frenchman rather than demented squirrel actually designed this loom.  :blink2:

 

There are just so many examples of going back and forth that one couldn't possibly list them all ..but just for example : The brake light switch wires come into the engine bay through the bulkhead in the main bundle, immediately branches off, and then go back through the bulkhead via another hole ..to get back to the pedal box inside the car.   And the earthing wire from the heater blower is almost 2ft long, because it goes around the houses to the battery lead terminal ..rather than earthing to the bolt holding the blower on - just 2" away !  

 

Just for fun it seems.. other wires suddenly change within the loom. They do this via crimped connectors ..where either three or four cables of different sizes and colour are crimped together with a piece of insulating tape around them, before being hidden away inside the bundle of loosely wrapped loom.  :ph34r:

 

I guess one cannot fault it too much because it has lasted well., and aside from being a bear to work on, Citroen wiring doesn't have anything near as bad a rap as Lucas.

 

 

..And this little diversion into wiring started out - why ? ...simply because I wanting to paint the bulkhead. :unsure:

..just a couple of (dozen) little things need moving, but then decided to alter the location of these . . .

P1240547as.jpg

^ the two fuse boxes are 'normally' situated under / behind the spare wheel, which rests on that bulkhead bracket, on the bracket inboard of the master cylinder, and otherwise on the inner wheel arch.

 

There are already plenty of holes through the bulkhead  (most of which I hope to blank off), but I needed to drill two large holes through the side of the steering column brace.  See arrows below

P1240575as.jpg

^ yes, it was a sod to get in there ..in the back corner of a small parcel shelf, behind a bracket.

 

And this is where I'm at .. at close of play today. . .

P1240576as.jpg

So far all the wires have been long enough. And the fuse boxes with their loops of cable are no longer on the engine side of the bulkhead, but instead are being tucked (will be neatly) into the back of the small parcel shelf (with easy access through the open driver's door).  The second fuse box is going in besides this one. 

 

We'll see how well it works out tomorrow :rolleyes:

I just love it..

Bfg.


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 ...its a bloody motor car, not a Fabergé egg. !

 

My former Sunbeam S7 / S8 motorcycle restoration business website < Here >


#375 OFFLINE   spartacus

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 09:52 PM

I'm liking the thread too Bfg, loads of detailed preventative work going on.
I've got a load of really good exercises and tips for tennis elbow, although you may know them already, drop me a pm if not and I'll send them over.
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#376 OFFLINE   RayMK

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 10:19 PM

A Frenchman's logic is often charming, usually unorthodox, and amazingly when applied to engineering design somehow gives a reliable product.  This statement is of course based on a small sample*. I have owned a 2cv6, Dyane, GSA, CX GTi Turbo 2, Renaults 12 and 20, Peugeot Moped and a Peugeot 205 Automatic. All were tolerably reliable (205 still is) and a joy to drive, partly because they felt different and ...errr.. French.  None suffered electrical problems.  

 

Nevertheless, shifting those fuse boxes inside is a sensible mod.  

 

I have not owned a Goona. Despite some determined individuals on here who have managed to keep them mobile, I suspect that, if I bought one, my view of French logic would be suitably scathing.


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#377 ONLINE   Bfg

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 09:09 AM

.

^ Thanks, ..can't deny most of what you say. 'Charming ' might be stretching the point though

..when you face an unfathomable issue !?  :boomer:

 

 

Hallelujah.. I mighta just seen the coloured light !   :mrgreen:

 

..peeking again at one of the pictures above (the one showing the open fuse boxes on the engine bay side of the bulkhead) with its just light-grey (perhaps once white ?), green, and yellow wires ..And then from the stirring of my grey matter "wires suddenly change within the loom. They do this via crimped connectors ..where either three or four cables of different sizes and colour are crimped together with a piece of insulating tape around them, before being hidden away inside the bundle of loosely wrapped loom

 

"..different sizes and colour".   Yes.. yellow wires are thicker than the grey, and green wires are of a smaller size.  Perhaps in French - the wire's colour simply represent its electrical load capacity. 

 

I had noted that there's also a heavier blue wire to and from the alternator. But I'll have to check to see what the brown, black and very-light-grey (as opposed to white) wires are.?      

 

Amazing.. and perhaps a little worrying, to think that I might begin to understand French logic :shock: 

 

Bfg ;)


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#378 ONLINE   dollywobbler

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 09:54 AM

Ah yes. The colour-changing wiring really does make life interesting. I'm so glad the 2CV has so little wiring...


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#379 OFFLINE   forddeliveryboy

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 12:20 PM

A Frenchman's logic is often charming, usually unorthodox, and amazingly when applied to engineering design somehow gives a reliable product. This statement is of course based on a small sample.


I too scratched my head in disbelief when first encountering old Citroen wiring, it does have a logic all of its own which leaves Brits a bit flustered, but in my experience it's reliable and tough, much better than that on German or Italian cars of the same age. It's the colour-coded sleeves which distinguish the wires, not the insulation colour.

Two exceptions - the positioning of relays on CXs which are vulnerable to salt spray (but easily accessed to be treated with protection), and the addition of dim-dip to the 2cv's ancient switches and wiring which showed traditional French contempt for The English, but which can be easily dispensed with.

Keep up the good work, BfG, I look forward to the MoT pass and first hoon!
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#380 ONLINE   Bfg

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 12:55 PM

Hey FDB where have you been ? ..not seen you around these parts lately.. hope you've been well.. 

 

I'm glad you are back.

 

Bfg ;)

 

.

..little over a month after getting the car here .. then a really busy morning doing last minute jobs, before a 35 mile round trip to the garage.

MOT : Pass  (albeit with advisory for worn a tyre) and a verbal warning that I should have a rubber on the throttle pedal  :-D

 

The car clearly needs a lot of tweaking to carburation, gearbox, clutch, handbrake, lights, steering, suspension, seats & seat belts, et cetera, et cetera...but she made it there and back without incident.  (sort of just :shock: )

 

..next task will be to apply for UK registration. I hate filling in forms - but at least I have the pleasure in knowing that I'll have no road-fund-license to pay.  :P

 

Sorry no garage photo, as I rushed out without taking the camera. but fwtw here's a couple from when I got back.

 

attachicon.gifP1230507a.JPG

 

attachicon.gifP1230504.JPG

 

Now I'm going to take the rest of the day off ;) 

Bfg.

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#381 OFFLINE   forddeliveryboy

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 02:17 PM

Hey FDB where have you been ? ..not seen you around these parts lately.. hope you've been well..

I'm glad you are back.

Bfg ;)



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Pete, bin around all the while, and since I'd liked the post mentioning the test pass I've obviously since forgotten she'd got through! So obviously the brain's fading but the rest is good, thanks.

What's the score with that steering pinion? Tyre choice? I must've missed a few posts in this long-running thread, mefinks. Seem to remember not wanting to get involved with whether or not to balance wheels at some point...

Are you painting her yourself, perhaps? One of the best paint jobs I've seen on an obscure old Cit was on a GS which had been amateur-sprayed on someone's drive - think that was someone in the Home Counties.

#382 ONLINE   Bfg

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 07:30 PM

.

hey good buddy - you're incognito with a new avatar (most likely since 2016 ?)

 

Likewise this ol giffer's brain is not as sharp ..as it would be if I had a much needed six weeks of all expenses paid holiday.. but dream-on Pete.. life is as it is ! :-D

 

Money's been / is tight since I got back from Slovene and got a bollocks-kicking bill for crummy workmanship on my Sunbeam's engine.  Add to that the cost of transport and cross ferry shipping (sensible but still costly) to get the car back here before Christmas (..as it was otherwise standing outside, and the insurance was going to be cancelled). And so I'm living with the steering pinion for the time being (with my priority moving to preventing the car from dissolving in winter / spring-time humidity).

 

Hopefully another pinion will crop up at sometime, but £100 a pop to try and find a good used one isn't a possibility.  Likewise for lack of budget reasons I've not yet bought tyres  ..and am faced with painting the car myself. .  Obviously the time scale on this car has gone out of the window, but at least by the time it's done - someone will be glad to inherit it  :mrgreen:

 

Dollywobbler says no need to balance these wheels, and surely he's done enough miles (tyre changes) to know.   Isn't logical to me but I'm glad to try it without and learn, and only resort to balancing if required on this particular car.

 

 

Today I tackled a bit more wiring, not important stuff, just a little more re-routing.

I also dislike wires of the wrong length and twisted jumbles . . .

P1240578a.jpg

^ I did a little tidying earlier in the year when I had the dashboard out,  but that was just to make things secure (neither pinched nor chafing).

 

So this time I've been running through 'ordering things', in anticipation of reassembly. . .

P1240580s.jpg

^ some would say ship-shape, others (most !) would say this sort of thing is pretty anal, but either way I'm checking its condition, and then it also helps me achieve something that I can make sense of  ..and therefore am able to live with should I be faced with an electrical fault. 

 

Then I moved on to the bulkhead. This is 'as was' (below)...

Ami Super P1240024as.jpg

 

with details like..

P1240504s.jpg

^ a man may spray rubberised paint over crud, but at the end of the day.. it's still crud and it'll rot out of sight.  (btw ..it's a recess in the bulkhead for the bonnet hinge). The flat panel to the left of the picture is a divider between this hinge recess and the fresh-air intake plenum (with its open grille facing upwards). The bottom of this panel is not sealed, and so any moisture in the plenum could seep / sit under this.

 

and..

P1240581as.jpg

^ Janez might have been kind enough to fit a shiny new nut & bolt  ..but I do wish he'd repaired the cracked bulkhead while he had easy access and his welder in hand.  This bolt holds the floor gear-change box in place.. Strange how that is fitted three quarters the way over the large hole ..without even a blanking grommet in it.

 

Anyway I duly pulled it apart and welded the crack up (with a thick penny-washer behind it), then decided to turn the battery around by 90 degrees ..so it didn't protrude so much / restrict access over the brakes, by cutting the front 1-1/2" of the support bracket off.   I then set about cleaning up the bulkhead and eventually, this evening, repainting it with the two-pack (top half only so far) . . .

P1240587s.jpg

 

P1240586s.jpg

 

P1240589as.jpg

 

Bfg ;)


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#383 ONLINE   Bfg

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 06:46 PM

.

...Not very interesting work today, in fact a bit of a rotten job - which was to clean out, check and paint the scuttle vent plenum.  It looked like this . . .

Ami super scuttle vent P1240594a.jpg

^ I thought that's in pretty good shape considering.. A couple of pin holes through the bottom but just a couple.  In typical Shitroen fashion any drips from those would go inside the car   :roll: 

 

However, I was particularly interested in the bits I couldn't see.. ie. up in the ends where the end plate divides this plenum off from the recessed bonnet hinge pockets.  So I removed the vent elbows (which are normally hidden under the dashboard).  Again not too bad at all., just full of crud which would hold moisture...

 

P1240600as.jpg

  and . .

P1240604as.jpg

 

So I cleaned them up, with wood-chisel, wire brush, and ss wire wool (held in a pair of plumber's slip-grips because I couldn't get may hands up in the ends). . .

P1240603s.jpg

^ Thankfully both sides were still intact :)  ..but as I mentioned before - the original sealing mastic around it had dried up, cracked and now did nothing useful at all. Likewise much of the mastic along this panel's bottom seam, which is even more vulnerable to rotting through.

 

Anyway, I repainted the plenum with epoxy primer ..which I applied thick enough to seal the pin holes through the bottom.  Good stuff this epoxy but I really don't get on with its vapours, esp. when painting from inside the car. .

P1240611a.jpg

  and. .

P1240612s.jpg

 

 

Thereafter, I switched to the 2-pack and finished a bit missed on the inner wings (deliberately missed I might add ..as it was the face I rested the panel on while painting the rest of it ;-) ), and then did the Aussie bit of bulkhead (down under) . . 

P1240615s.jpg

 

That's it for this week. Have a pleasant day off tomorrow.

 

Bfg ;)

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#384 OFFLINE   RayMK

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 07:10 PM

"Not very interesting work today...."

 

I find that cleaning the grotty bits for inspection, then painting with something that will resist corrosion for years, is quite satisfying.  The interesting bits usually turn out to be more expensive to restore to satisfactory working condition.

 

It's coming on very nicely.


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#385 OFFLINE   stuboy

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 10:58 PM

coming on nicely



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