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XJ40 - Rust! Welding! A cat with management skills!


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144 replies to this topic

#61 OFFLINE   purplebargeken

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 10:09 PM

The XJ40 is a car that everyone has to own at some point. I really miss mine. The prices are as low as a low thing and will have to start climbing at some point (most likey as soon as I can afford one). The sill end is a really odd design fail and led to my 3.6 requiring some remedial work. It really is a damp mud trap as mentioned. Interesting to know about the bulkhead woes. Another rust prone area used to be the boot lid lip, oh, and by the fuel filler cap. Rust moth issues aside, they are just superb cars and I am so glad to see the love that yours is getting.

Ken

#62 OFFLINE   Pete-M

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 10:47 PM

I have to say that I've never really got on with the XJ40, which is strange because my X300 is a very early XJR (Nov 94) so it shouldn't be that dissimilar to a late XJ40.

Mr Rustbucket's example is insanely clean everywhere it isn't rusty, and after autofusion have done the welding it won't be rusty at all. As long as whoever does the painting does it right this must be one of the best XJ40s anywhere. I cannot imagine how it has managed to stay as clean as it is over 20 or so years. Properly puts my XJR to shame, and mine's a reasonably nice one.

214837.png 180526.png

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#63 OFFLINE   Magnificent Rustbucket

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 07:10 PM

I have to say that I've never really got on with the XJ40, which is strange because my X300 is a very early XJR (Nov 94) so it shouldn't be that dissimilar to a late XJ40.

Mr Rustbucket's example is insanely clean everywhere it isn't rusty, and after autofusion have done the welding it won't be rusty at all. As long as whoever does the painting does it right this must be one of the best XJ40s anywhere. I cannot imagine how it has managed to stay as clean as it is over 20 or so years. Properly puts my XJR to shame, and mine's a reasonably nice one.



I do somtimes wonder if I hadn't washed it as often, whether it would have gone so rusty!
1992 Jaguar Sovereign

#64 OFFLINE   Magnificent Rustbucket

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 07:17 PM

Again, the tasks are out of sequence. The rear deck panel was replaced after Gray had repaired the front driver's door pillar and sill. I'm missing a couple of photos of that, so I will post those areas of the restoration when I have them.


As purplebargeken says, the rear deck panel between the rear window and boot lid is a real rust spot on the XJ40. My car was no exception and the rear deck panel on my car has dubious past, involving filler! Bodging doesn’t last and rust was festering. The paint on my car isn't oxidised and retains its lustre well, so any changes in pitch and texture on the body are very obvious. I saw it ripple slightly every single time I walked past the car whenever the sun was out - the reflection wasn't quite right and really made me shudder!

I managed to obtain a genuine Jaguar repair panel, part number CAP6314. The rear deck panel is a real heavyweight thing which made the plenum panel feel like it is made from biscuit tin lids.

Gray began by drilling out all the welds. Removing the rear deck panel is complicated by the XJ40's construction and the order in which the parts were originally assembled by Jaguar.
In particular, Jaguar welded the sides of the car on to the inner core as single units, something the company was very proud of at the time. This means the deck panel Gray needed to remove was welded in by Jaguar before the panels surrounding it, so lies beneath them. Removing the rear deck is a time consuming, painstaking process.

Removal starts:

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Gone! It wasn’t as easy as this! :D

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Fitting the new panel isn't any easier! It forms an important line on the car and must be perfect. Gray likes to get things completely 'just-so' and has achieved a perfect fit - it is identical to the original and a pleasure to see. I am relieved I won't have to suffer that 'glimpse' of filler in the sun anymore ...I tend to obsess about small imperfections! :oops:

New panel welded in, it is a perfect fit:

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The fuel filler flap assembly is not bolted in yet, thus sits low.

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It fits perfectly.

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#65 OFFLINE   Magnificent Rustbucket

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 11:16 PM

I'm not sure what has happened to this thread - it seems to have been mangled a bit in the middle with a whole series of posts and replies repeated! Still, it makes my old rustbucket feel popular now the thread is twice as long!

 

With the rear deck panel on, the rear pillars under the polished stainless steel sixlights and rear pillar finishers were examined for rust. The rear pillar doesn’t look too bad at all…

 

rearpillar1.jpg

 

But after the trim has been removed…arghhhh!!

 

rearpillar2.jpg

 

I thought the other side was perfect – no rust showed at all, though there was a disconcerting slight brownness under the chrome if squinted at hard enough. Under the trim is a blooming hole!!  :shock:

 

rearpillar3.jpg

 

rearpillar5.jpg

 

Starting to cut away…

 

rearpillar4.jpg

 

 

I took several pictures of the repairs to both sides, but could only find these two:

 

A%201.jpg

 

A%202.jpg

 

After the welders had finished, the car came back to the house – we needed to wait for a dry day, since it was a long way from watertight. I had wanted the car to go straight to the painter but he was running late.

 

Super lightweight special!! I did drive it a short distance like this, though obviously only on an industrial estate – not the road. It was a strange feeling with no doors or windscreen. There was a real sensation of speed and imminent doom.

 

B%201.jpg

 

B%202.jpg

 

They’re old cars now – but very complex and sophisticated for their day. It is amazing given the complexity that they are so reliable electrically:

 

B%203.jpg


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1992 Jaguar Sovereign

#66 OFFLINE   phil_lihp

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 11:18 PM

Eep!  Good work, I hope mine isn't hiding anything like that!


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#67 ONLINE   320touring

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 11:24 PM

Making me glad I backed away from the last one I had..

good effort!
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#68 OFFLINE   MarvinsMom

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 11:24 PM

sweeet jeeeeeeeezussss

 

good work sir, i love seeing these lovely, if unloved cars getting some attention.

 

there is something special about a jaguar, even one thats slightly down at heel.

 

i love mine, the other half says we got too many cars, and the XJ6 has gotta go, whereas i say the mini should go.

 

the XJ WILL be staying......


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#69 OFFLINE   forddeliveryboy

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 12:07 AM

Great pics. Had a mate who p/exd his 4.0 Sov for an XK-R. Pleased as punch for a couple of weeks, then got tired of the obvious and longed for a bit of British quality (and comfort) back.

 

Having a Fiesta key fob and other Ford bits, including mirrrors, didn't help things. But easy girls liked it, so he kept it, against his better judgement. He never did find lasting love - the lohl adored the 40 for all its faults, but he was young and daft and thought she was old-fashioned like the car.


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#70 OFFLINE   Magnificent Rustbucket

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 12:10 AM

Making me glad I backed away from the last one I had..

good effort!

 

 

There are two kinds of XJ40 - high mileage ones which are rusty on the bottom, and low mileage ones which are rusty on the top!


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#71 OFFLINE   Magnificent Rustbucket

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 12:12 AM

sweeet jeeeeeeeezussss

 

good work sir, i love seeing these lovely, if unloved cars getting some attention.

 

there is something special about a jaguar, even one thats slightly down at heel.

 

i love mine, the other half says we got too many cars, and the XJ6 has gotta go, whereas i say the mini should go.

 

the XJ WILL be staying......

 

 

They are wonderful old things - and really the last gasp of old Jaguar, with their connection to William Lyons. The rust is particularly authentic.


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#72 OFFLINE   Magnificent Rustbucket

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 12:19 AM

More update! All this after so long!

 

I had to wait a little while for the painter: he was running late and I was temped to find someone else. I would come to wish I had followed my instinct, since he proved a difficult man to deal with. It came as a real contrast to the welders – that stage had been a lot of fun. The paint stage was not so fun; I wasn’t particularly well and let things slide. Consequently it took ages.

 

These were taken the first time I visited:

 

Paint%201.jpg

 

Paint%202.jpg

 

Paint%203.jpg

 

The following visit, the car had paint and was beginning to return to looking like my car again! I got used to seeing it in this dismantled state; A year before I would have panicked seeing the car so far from complete.

 

Paint%204.jpg

 

Paint%205.jpg

 

Paint%206.jpg

 

Paint%207.jpg

 

Paint%209.jpg

 

Eventually, he finished the thing. I had intended to drive the car to an MOT station near to the painter’s workshop, have it MOT’d, then drive it home – thus saving the need to have the car transported. Alas, it wasn’t to be. The car had developed a water leak from the rear gasket of a metal water rail to the rear of the engine. It wouldn’t pass an MOT like that. Had I known, I would have built the car back up at home – rather than at the workshop. Oh well…

 

Paint%2010a.jpg

 

The red 911 in the background is a 3 litre Carrera which had just undergone quite a bit of welding – very well done it was too. And yes, that is a Milkfloat.

 

Paint%2012.jpg

 

Well on the way now!

 

 

 

You can see from this photo how good the floor is of my car. It has had very little rust which was repaired in 2009.

Paint%2011.jpg

 

There are an incredible number of parts, nuts bolts and screws of various different sizes on an XJ40. The old beast makes its BL heritage known by the mix of Imperial, metric, and various other standards, mixed freely throughout the car.

 

I carefully sorted and catalogued each and every one of them, putting them all in the right order in a box together with the part they secure – it took me a whole evening. The painter then tipped the box on to the floor, mixing them all up and plunging me into a full-Rainman tribute performance!!

 

 

 

.


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1992 Jaguar Sovereign

#73 OFFLINE   The Moog

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 12:28 AM

Milk float and a 911.... Legend

911 to pull the hot 20 year old totty ... Milk float for a full Pat Mustard experience for the mums...
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#74 OFFLINE   Magnificent Rustbucket

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 01:38 AM

Once back home, several things still needed to be done – the interior needed to be fitted – only the dash and driver’s seat had been put in; the windscreen wiper assembly needed to be fitted and the leaking water rail gasket needed to be replaced. The engine bay had become very dusty and also required cleaning to look its best.

 

I wasn’t going to take any chances with the bulkhead rusting again, so before the wiper went in, I liberally squirted Dinitrol all over the inside of the plenum. Loads of it.

 

P1080150.jpg

 

 

The dash looks fairly daunting, but is a clever design and goes back in very easily. The XJ40 was designed to come apart and reassemble very easily – and is a very easy car to work on. All plugs are colour coded and of differing size. Fixings are good quality – often metal and when they are plastic they are of good quality: few, if any fixings broke when I removed the dash or interior – indeed, I have a box full of new ones I purchased which I did not need.

 

I had intended to get a second hand driver’s seat to put in the car when it was in the body shop. I never actually got round to this and after the work had been completed it was very dirty. Thankfully though it was undamaged and the painter was careful not to allow any overspray.

 

It cleaned up well however – and suffered no deterioration as a result. The interior of the XJ40 is good quality and lasts the miles well. The steering wheel has an early airbag. It is no more attractive in real life!

 

Interior%201.jpg

 

The lambswool rugs are missing from this photo – I must not have put them in yet when the picture was taken. I like them: they add to the slightly louche and disreputable feel and underscore how different these Jaguars are to most other cars.

 

Interior%202.jpg

 

It is a bit dark, this photo – and the centre armrest isn’t quite sitting right. It took some adjusting!

 

Interior%203.jpg

 

Camera just sneaking into shot!

 

Interior%204.jpg

 

Grey leather – very much of the period.

 

Interior%205.jpg

 

I had obviously put the fur rugs in by the time I took this shot.

 

Interior%206.jpg

 

Boot complete with errant spanner.


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1992 Jaguar Sovereign

#75 OFFLINE   hauserplenty

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 03:27 AM

Magnificent.
No rustbucket, that one, just a proper Jaag-you-urr. I've always wanted an 80's model with Chevrolet running gear. I almost bought one, but the 90's cars are a big improvement.
I talked to an Australian gentleman some years ago, who used to run a Jag dealership. He put me right off buying one, by saying I would need to buy two--one for the driveway, one for the shop! Also he said if it was built on a Monday or a Friday it would be poorly built and much more expensive to maintain...
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#76 ONLINE   320touring

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 09:50 AM

Looks lovely!

proper caddish conveyance these things-a great feeling to drive
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#77 OFFLINE   sierraman

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 09:54 AM

There's not many as tidy as that. Nice work!
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#78 OFFLINE   xtriple

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 11:13 AM

Bloody beautiful. Well done on restoring her to her former glory.


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#79 OFFLINE   shumarialto

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 03:16 PM

Very nice indeed. When my 75 came back the interior needed a deep clean, was hard work.


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#80 OFFLINE   Shandylegs

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 03:43 PM

Wonderful job and good to see the XJ40 starting to get the love they deserve.

 

I remember working on them in the late 80's, they made the S3's seem acient in comparison. I may be one of the few, but to me they are far superior to the series XJs in almost every department!   


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#81 OFFLINE   Magnificent Rustbucket

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 03:43 PM

Returning the interior to the car was the first thing I did on the car’s arrival – storing it was taking up a lot of room. The coolant leak could wait – though it did mean the car was not MOT’d so could not be taken off SORN.

 

 

With the interior in, the car looked once again the way I remembered it.

 

Detailed2.jpg

 

Detailed3.jpg

 

Detailed6.jpg

 

Detailed8.jpg

 

Detailed9.jpg

 

Detailed19.jpg

 

These photos must have been taken after I had fixed the water leak, since the engine compartment is clean again:

 

Detailed21.jpg

 

Detailed22.jpg

 

The paint is pretty good, with a shiny consistent finish, accurate colour, the correct size of metallic flake (smaller and less noticeable than modern cars) and the clearcoat has great clarity. I am especially pleased that the colour retains the strange glow it takes on in certain lights. The painter used Glasurit paint and I am impressed with it.

 

It isn’t perfect. There is a very slight wave down the sides when viewed with movement from an oblique angle. Not the shimmering horror so often seen down the flanks of cars I see at car shows – which spoil otherwise lovely cars, but enough to irk me.

 

It is apparent when the sides are viewed from low down – crouching or kneeling – and looking backwards over the shoulder into light. Put like this, I am even sounding silly to myself and no one else sees it, it must be said. I am being pedantic and I didn’t pay enough for the paint to expect perfection. It looks smart: that should be enough!

 

Looking down the sides, reflections are clear, in focus and in the main, close to straight. A slight weave is revealed by the piece of skirting board which lives on the garage floor since it is so much smaller than any of the skirting board in the house!

 

Sides%201.jpg

 

Sides%203.jpg

 

Sides%204.jpg

 

Sides%205.jpg

 

Sides%206.jpg

 

The right hand side is just the same, but difficult to photograph since the car was parked near to the garage wall:

 

Sides%207.jpg

 

Sides%208.jpg

 

I have since adjusted the right hand rear bumper side bracket so that it no longer splays out, but sits snug to the wing as it should. The slight turn out of the rubber part of the bumper I could do nothing with: it is a common XJ40 foible – possibly caused by the rubber shrinking slightly over time? It has been like this for many years.

 

Looking closer, I also noticed the front bumper didn’t quite fit – but splays out at the corner pieces. Solving this took an embarrassingly long period of head scratching bewilderment!

 

Bumper%201.jpg

 

Bumper%202.jpg

 

Bumper%203.jpg

 

Initially I assumed that the bumper was not sitting quite far back enough. The Bumper sides are adjusted in and out by a pin on the inside of the bumper sliding in a track set in the bumper mount, the track having a curved path. Moving the block forward or aft will bring in or splay out the bumper’s side piece. This is how the rear bumper sides are adjusted.

 

Bumper%204.jpg

 

Not so the front: the bumper brackets are set – there is no movement in them. I took the bumper off, discovering that the bumper cannot be mounted too far forward – it is held on by two enormous bolts: they only go in one way – and have to line up.

 

This set me to thinking: there was only one possibility left I could come up with – that the bumper brackets were on backwards because the left hand one had been put on the right wing and vice-versa. I had labelled everything to avoid this – and everything else that was tipped on the floor!

 

Success! I swapped the brackets over and re-attached the bumper. It fit!

 

From this:

 

Bumper%201.jpg

 

To this:

 

Bumper%209.jpg

 

Whilst I was scrambling around on the floor attempting to reattach the front spoiler, I heard a huge fluttering kafuffle to the back of the car. Two birds really sounded as if they were fighting – or one was trying to eat another. I levered myself round on the car and sprang up. At the same moment a wood pigeon flew terrified with all the speed it could muster into the garage – followed by a large brown bird of prey, possibly a buzzard, but so fast I cannot tell for sure.

 

Bumper%206.jpg

 

Death was swift. In a second, all that was left in the garage of the pigeon was its head and a handful of feathers. So I put on the front spoiler and marvelled at the straightness of my bumper.

 

Bumper%207.jpg


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1992 Jaguar Sovereign

#82 ONLINE   NorfolkNWeigh

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 04:14 PM

That's some outstanding commitment ,not to mention a long term investment, good work to you!
This makes me feel so old, I can remember taking delivery of my* ( well, it was allocated to me to drive my boss) first XJ40 at the end of 1987. Can't remember the budget, but both the other , older, chauffeurs chose 2.9 Sovereigns. I studied the brochures and price lists for weeks. Then begged the Transport Manager and Commercial Director to let me spec up a 3.6 XJ6.
The extras were Automatic transmission, Air conditioning, Full black leather, Rear head rests, Sunroof and Solent Blue metallic paint. I wasn't bothered about alloys and apart from them and the headlights it was pretty close to a Sov. But, it went like fuck compared to a nasty 2.9, I saw 150 on the speedo more than once( usually gradient assisted) in fact im pretty sure the only Jag I've driven that was faster was a Supercharged S-Type, and I've driven a lot of other Jags including manual 4.0s and V12 S3s When I first got it I preferred my old 4.2 , even though it didn't even have Aircon and was happy to use it whenever a Director's personal car was off the road - they all preferred to use FPD because it was so quick. In fact I bought the S3 from the company in 1989, although. I sold it to my brother within 6 months as I couldn't justify keeping it (B593 NLL,where are you now?) wish I'd bought the 3.6 when I got a Merc 300SE 2 years later.
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#83 OFFLINE   Skizzer

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 04:30 PM

Magnificent is the right word.

 

And clean?  You could eat your dinner off that engine bay.  Even if you're not a buzzard.


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#84 OFFLINE   Magnificent Rustbucket

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 04:37 PM

That's some outstanding commitment ,not to mention a long term investment, good work to you!
This makes me feel so old, I can remember taking delivery of my* ( well, it was allocated to me to drive my boss) first XJ40 at the end of 1987. Can't remember the budget, but both the other , older, chauffeurs chose 2.9 Sovereigns. I studied the brochures and price lists for weeks. Then begged the Transport Manager and Commercial Director to let me spec up a 3.6 XJ6.
The extras were Automatic transmission, Air conditioning, Full black leather, Rear head rests, Sunroof and Solent Blue metallic paint. I wasn't bothered about alloys and apart from them and the headlights it was pretty close to a Sov. But, it went like fuck compared to a nasty 2.9, I saw 150 on the speedo more than once( usually gradient assisted) in fact im pretty sure the only Jag I've driven that was faster was a Supercharged S-Type, and I've driven a lot of other Jags including manual 4.0s and V12 S3s When I first got it I preferred my old 4.2 , even though it didn't even have Aircon and was happy to use it whenever a Director's personal car was off the road - they all preferred to use FPD because it was so quick. In fact I bought the S3 from the company in 1989, although. I sold it to my brother within 6 months as I couldn't justify keeping it (B593 NLL,where are you now?) wish I'd bought the 3.6 when I got a Merc 300SE 2 years later.

 

 

My dad bought one of the early 3.6 litre cars back in February 1987 - his was also a specced-up XJ6. His was Westminster blue with grey leather - and close to Sovereign spec too. They were fast cars back then. His business partner bought a Sovereign 2.9; quite a few of these were sold early on, before it was well known how inferior they were to the 3.6.

 

This photo was taken in 1988:

 

BlueWhale.jpg


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1992 Jaguar Sovereign

#85 OFFLINE   Magnificent Rustbucket

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 04:38 PM

Magnificent is the right word.

 

And clean?  You could eat your dinner off that engine bay.  Even if you're not a buzzard.

 

 

Ha thanks! The Magnificent once-and-future-Rustbucket!  :D


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#86 OFFLINE   Magnificent Rustbucket

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 04:42 PM

Magnificent.
No rustbucket, that one, just a proper Jaag-you-urr. I've always wanted an 80's model with Chevrolet running gear. I almost bought one, but the 90's cars are a big improvement.
I talked to an Australian gentleman some years ago, who used to run a Jag dealership. He put me right off buying one, by saying I would need to buy two--one for the driveway, one for the shop! Also he said if it was built on a Monday or a Friday it would be poorly built and much more expensive to maintain...

 

As a consequence of the extraordinarily complex and varied array of English pronunciations, to me it isn't a Jagwahr or a Jag-you-urr - but a Jag-you-are, which is kind of a hybrid of the two!


1992 Jaguar Sovereign

#87 OFFLINE   forddeliveryboy

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 06:29 PM

Beautiful. I use and respect MB 124 estates hugely but why anyone would have chosen a 124 saloon over a 40 beats me.


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#88 OFFLINE   hauserplenty

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 07:57 PM

I've been told that the D'yagg-wyre* dealers don't care how you pronounce it...









...as long as you've got the money to buy it.

*Common pronunciation in the American.
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“Some people's idea of free speech is that they are free to say what they like, but if anyone says anything back, that is an outrage.” -- Sir Winston Churchill


#89 OFFLINE   Twiggy

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 10:09 PM

That is really beautiful.


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#90 OFFLINE   Magnificent Rustbucket

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 12:33 AM

It makes me realise how active this forum is when I have posted a thread - it took a bit of finding!! :D

 

None of this was solving the coolant leak!

 

The car has a history of loosing drops of coolant in the distant past – immeasurable in the grand scheme of things – never enough to cause a measurable drop in level, but enough to put an occasional drip on the garage floor after hot shutdown. This was a long time ago however; the coolant leak was sorted under warranty when the car was less than one year old. It would transpire that the dealer solved the leak by tightening the heater bypass valve (a vacuum operated valve which shuts off the water flow to the heater matrix when the A/C is switched to cool) – which attaches to the cylinder head on the left hand side, under the inlet manifold.  In tightening the valve, the mechanic had turned it, partially fouling the inlet manifold from underneath – which would make its presence felt over twenty years later in the form of a nightmarish experience removing the inlet manifold!!

 

The drip had returned a little while before I had the bodywork done. Shining a strong torch down between the inlet manifold’s pipes, I could see evidence of dried coolant building round the upper bolt which attaches the water pipe which returns water into the side of the engine. This isn’t a common problem – but nor is it unknown. It tends to develop very slowly and does not lead to a catastrophic loss of coolant if it suddenly worsens. The rubber pipe which runs from the pipe to the water pump can do this however: it is invisible and swelling and deterioration can go unnoticed. Consequently it can fail – generally under load, with the loss of all the coolant very rapidly indeed. The Jaguar AJ6 engine is one of the strongest of any car: it will generally shrug off a loss of coolant in this way without damage. I know of several cars which have suffered in this way. None of them blew a head gasket or suffered other damage, despite more than one loss of coolant at speed in the fast lane of a motorway!

 

The leak worsened considerably in the time my Jag was at the painter. By the time he had finished it was enough to produce a pool under the car! It didn’t seem to phase him and he didn’t bother to tell me about it, which displeased me. He didn’t bother topping it up either – and it was somewhat low (though not seriously so) when I picked the car up. Tough as ever, there has been no damage done.

 

C%204.jpg

 

With the inlet manifold and thermostat housing removed, the water pipe is visible along the side of the engine. The water rail had leaked for some time – there was a small but noticeable build up of dried coolant all around both the top and bottom bolts and I worried that the bolts would be corroded. I need not have worried though – all four of the bolts were clean, untarnished metal. The coolant has been replaced every couple of years since the car was new – the lack of corrosion is my reward for that.

 

At the rear of the engine you can see the heater shutoff valve. This had turned up when tightened clockwise which prevented the manifold from coming off. It was VERY difficult to remove in situ, but I had no choice!

 

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Together with the old one: I replaced it with a genuine Jaguar item – happily, in common with nearly all the other parts for the car, it was marked ‘Made in England’. I believe some of the aftermarket ones are made in Mexico.

 

C%203.jpg

 

I took the opportunity to replace all of the hoses and the coolant. The hose behind the water pump is especially difficult to replace when the manifold is on.

 

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Making sure the new inlet manifold gasket fits – I bought it from Jaguar, but it is not the same as the original three part gasket with a plastic spacer. The new gasket is a one  piece affair with the card parts glued to a central (plywood!!) spacer. I need not have worried: it works well.

 

C%206.jpg

 

Now the thermostat housing is fitted to the front of the engine and the last two water pipes attached to it and to the engine itself. This leaves only the heated air breather and its two tiny pipes and the expansion tank to do after the inlet manifold is fitted.

 

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Now it was time to put back the inlet manifold. I was concerned by some slight scratching on the mating surface – possibly done when I was trying in vain to get the damn thing off! Indeed, I asked whether it needed to be reskimmed on xj40.com and also on the ‘Jag-lovers’ forum. The general consensus is that it was fine – as it proved to be. I have not suffered any air leaks.

 

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Here it sits waiting for its moment in our (very messy) utility room.

 

And back on! – This was exceedingly easy now the water valve was on correctly.

 

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The oil filler tube was refitted along with the idle air valve and heated breather and I connected the fuel rail. Some of the breather pipes were a little swelled, so I replaced all of them. All the vacuum lines were a little hard, so they were replaced too.

 

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Connected and checked all the evaporative loss system on the inlet manifold’s underside:

 

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And fitted the air flow meter and air filter housing:

 

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Adjusted the throttle and transmission cable:

 

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And it was done!

 

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I had already cleaned the engine compartment, which had become very dusty in the painter’s workshop. I did this before I removed the inlet manifold, since I like to work in a clean environment. There is less chance of me contaminating something important if it is all clean – and I can see what I’m doing!!

 

C%2020.jpg

 

I was also able to buy an NOS brake fluid warning label since the the old one had become tatty. It must have had some brake fluid spilled on it many moons ago – so had dried out.

 

Under bonnet relays and the high pressure hydraulic accumulator and pump. Jaguar used this technology under license from Citroën.

 

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1992 Jaguar Sovereign




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